Mathematics Department - Logic Seminar - Fall 2016

Logic Seminar - Fall 2016



Organizer(s)

Gregory Cherlin

Archive

Website

http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~rlg131/logicseminar.html



Upcoming Talks


Monday, October 3rd

Saharon Shelah, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Rutgers University

"Random graphs: a stronger logic, but with the zero one law , III"

Time: 5:00 PM
Location: Hill 705
Abstract: THE TALK CONTINUES.......This is based on paper [1077] We like to find a logic stronger than first order such that: on the one hand it satisfies the 0-1 law, e.g. for the random graph $cG_{n,1/2}$ and on the other hand there is a formula $varphi(x)$ such that for no first order $psi(x)$ do we have: for every random enough $G_{n,1/2}$ are the formulas $varphi(x),psi(x)$ equivalent in it. We do it adding a quantifier on graph $bQ_{old t}$, i.e. have a class of finite graphs closed under isomorphisms and being able to say that if $(varphi_0(x,ar c),varphi_1(x_0,x_1,ar c))$ a pair of formulas with parameter define a graph in $cG_{n,1/2}$, hen , we can form a formula $psi(ar y)$ such $psi(ar c)$ says that the graph belongs $K_{ar{old t}}$. Presently we do it for random enough $ar{old t}$. In later versions we shall do it for $K_{old t} = {H:H$ a non-2-weak graph with number of cliques with $log log(|H|)$ nodes$}$ is one of $1,2,ldots lfloor sqrt{loglog(|H|)} floor$ modulo $lfloor loglog(|H|) floor$.





Past Talks


Monday, September 26th

Saharon Shelah, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Rutgers University

"Random graphs: a stronger logic, but with the zero one law , II"

Time: 5:00 PM
Location: Hill 705
Abstract: THE TALK CONTINUES.......This is based on paper [1077] We like to find a logic stronger than first order such that: on the one hand it satisfies the 0-1 law, e.g. for the random graph $cG_{n,1/2}$ and on the other hand there is a formula $varphi(x)$ such that for no first order $psi(x)$ do we have: for every random enough $G_{n,1/2}$ are the formulas $varphi(x),psi(x)$ equivalent in it. We do it adding a quantifier on graph $bQ_{old t}$, i.e. have a class of finite graphs closed under isomorphisms and being able to say that if $(varphi_0(x,ar c),varphi_1(x_0,x_1,ar c))$ a pair of formulas with parameter define a graph in $cG_{n,1/2}$, hen , we can form a formula $psi(ar y)$ such $psi(ar c)$ says that the graph belongs $K_{ar{old t}}$. Presently we do it for random enough $ar{old t}$. In later versions we shall do it for $K_{old t} = {H:H$ a non-2-weak graph with number of cliques with $log log(|H|)$ nodes$}$ is one of $1,2,ldots lfloor sqrt{loglog(|H|)} floor$ modulo $lfloor loglog(|H|) floor$.


Monday, September 19th

Saharon Shelah, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Rutgers University

"Random graphs: a stronger logic, but with the zero one law , I"

Time: 5:00 PM
Location: Hill 705
Abstract: This is based on paper [1077]

We like to find a logic stronger than first order such that: on the one hand it satisfies the 0-1 law, e.g. for the random graph $cG_{n,1/2}$ and on the other hand there is a formula $varphi(x)$ such that for no first order $psi(x)$ do we have: for every random enough $G_{n,1/2}$ are the formulas $varphi(x),psi(x)$ equivalent in it. We do it adding a quantifier on graph $bQ_{old t}$, i.e. have a class of finite graphs closed under isomorphisms and being able to say that if $(varphi_0(x,ar c),varphi_1(x_0,x_1,ar c))$ a pair of formulas with parameter define a graph in $cG_{n,1/2}$, hen , we can form a formula $psi(ar y)$ such $psi(ar c)$ says that the graph belongs $K_{ar{old t}}$. Presently we do it for random enough $ar{old t}$. In later versions we shall do it for $K_{old t} = {H:H$ a non-2-weak graph with number of cliques with $log log(|H|)$ nodes$}$ is one of $1,2,ldots lfloor sqrt{loglog(|H|)} floor$ modulo $lfloor loglog(|H|) floor$.


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