Directions to the Department

The Department of Mathematics at Rutgers-New Brunswick is located in the Hill Center* on the Busch Campus of Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ. (Piscataway is just across the Raritan River from New Brunswick.) The University page for Hill Center has a map and driving directions. Please click on the map to zoom out. Also, you can find more specific directions to the Hill Center by going to Google Maps and entering your starting location. Make sure to click "The Hill Center" link on the left hand side and then click "Get directions" and also select "to here" or "from here", depending on what you need. (The reason for doing this is that Google Maps, and other maps sites, does not have the correct location for the Hill Center. Hill Center is across Frelinghuysen Road from the northeast corner of the Rutgers Golf Course. ) *The rigorous definition is as follows: Longitude 74.47168 W, Latitude 40.52180 N. Our own travel directions are as follows: BY CAR: Because of road construction on and near the Busch campus, the driving instructions given below may change. The University also provides updated directions at University directions. NOTE: Rutgers University has five campuses in New Brunswick. The Department of Mathematics is located on the Busch Campus. Road signs marked "Rutgers University" may lead to the wrong campus. If you follow signs, those directing you to "Rutgers Stadium" will bring you to Busch Campus, the location of the Mathematics Department.From the NJ Turnpike: Take Exit 9 and proceed north (west) on New Jersey Route 18. It is recommended that you use either of the two leftmost lanes of Route 18. Follow Route 18 through New Brunswick and across the John A. Lynch Memorial Bridge. (Ignore the "George Street Rutgers University" exit.) Exit Route 18 at Campus Road (the sign also says Rutgers Stadium and Busch Campus). At the traffic circle, turn right onto Bartholomew Road. At the stop sign, turn left onto Brett Road. Follow Brett road until it vanishes in a maze of parking lots.  Visitors with guest permits may park in lot 64, 60A, 60B (or at lot 67 near Brett and Bartholomew Roads).  The Hill Center is the seven story dark brick building, located just behind the CORE building.   A lot for visitors without permits is available near the visitor's center on Busch campus. From Interstate Highway 287: Take the exit marked "River Road, Bound Brook, Highland Park" (exit 9), following River Road east toward Highland Park. Continue on River Road past Colgate and past the traffic light at Hoes Lane. At the next left turn lane (not the next possible next left turn), turn left onto Sutphen Rd. At the 4 way stop just beyond the stadium, turn left and follow Frelinghuysen Road. At the traffic circle, continue straight onto Bartholomew Road (i.e., ignore the first right turn and do not continue around the circle). At the stop sign, turn left onto Brett Road. Follow Brett road until it vanishes in a maze of parking lots. Park as indicated above.Note: If you miss the left turn onto Sutphen Rd., you will soon pass under the overpass for Route 18. Make the next left onto Route 18 North. Exit Route 18 at Campus Road (the sign also says Rutgers Stadium and Busch Campus). At the traffic circle, turn right onto Bartholmew Road. At the stop sign, turn left onto Brett Road. Follow Brett road until it vanishes in a maze of parking lots. Park as indicated above.From Long Island or New York City Airports: Take the Verrazzano Bridge to the Goethals Bridge to the New Jersey Turnpike and proceed as above. BY BUS: The Suburban Transit (1-800-222-0492) runs convenient express buses from New York City to New Brunswick. There a few places that they pick up and drop off from. Please check the website to see what is available. BY TRAIN: Train service to New Brunswick is provided by Amtrak and NJ Transit. This may require changing trains in Trenton or NY/Penn Station. Amtrak info: 1-800-USA-RAIL; NJ Transit: 1-800-772-2222 from NJ; from out of state: 1-973-762-5100.Once you reach downtown New Brunswick you can get to the Hill Center by taxi in 10 minutes for approximately \(10.00, or by campus bus FREE, in about 10-20 minutes. Buses leave at 10 minute intervals. To reach a campus bus stop from the New Jersey Transit bus station on Albany Street, walk west on Albany St., then take the first right onto George Street and walk two blocks to the first traffic light. Turn left onto Hamilton Street, walk one block and you will see the campus bus shelter on your right across College Avenue. To reach the bus stop from the train station at Albany and Easton, walk uphill on Easton Ave. and turn right onto Hamilton Street at the second traffic light. Walk one block and you will see the campus bus shelter on your left. Take an "A", or "H" bus marked to Busch Campus and get off at the Hill Center.How to walk from the New Brunswick Train Station to the Hill Center on the Busch Campus of Rutgers University BY PLANE: The nearest airport is Newark Liberty International Airport. If you fly there, you can either Take the Airtrain Newark directly from the arrivals terminal to the new Rail Link station and then connect with NJ Transit trains to New Brunswick. (cost is approximately \)16.) Take a taxi or hired car (the cost is approximately \(60 plus tolls plus tip). Rent a car.   From Kennedy airport, the cost of a taxi could be as high as \)120 plus tolls plus tip.You should never have to fly via LaGuardia. But if you do, from LaGuardia airport, you can either rent a car or take public transportation to New York City and then on to New Brunswick. How To Walk from The New Brunswick Train Station To The Hill Center in the Busch Campus of Rutgers University Last Update: March 28, 2006 [to enter the name of Busch Campus Drive]Previous Update: June 14, 2005. [To implement the new Busch-College Ave walkway]First Version: Jan. 14, 2002.Written By Doron Zeilberger.There is a safe way to walk, especially now with the new walkway. The whole way takes me appx. 32 minutes [using the new walkway] or 42 minutes [using the old route via Johnson Drive and the Stadium]. The instructions below also apply to biking, and the times then should be divided by 3. [Note by editor:  Doron walks quickly.] Go to the end of the platform (away from the station, in the direction of the train if you came from the West (Trenton) and in the opposite direction if you came from the East (NY) ), walk downstairs, make a left onto [ If you came from Trenton/Princeton: George and then immediately another left on] Somerset. Walk a block and make a right on College Ave. On the left-hand side, walk to the end of College Avenue and enter Buccleuch park (about 12 min. walks). Walk another minute on a path parallel to George St., and a little before the Buccleuch Mansion, make a right that leads to stairs. Walk down the stairs, and carefully cross George St. to the bike path/pedestrian walk on the Lynch bridge. After about two to three minutes you have a choice: turn left down to Johnson Drive and go the Old Way (see below, that takes 10 minutes longer) OR: New Way (June 2005): DONT's turn left (downhill), but go straight and continue on the bridge and follow the path all the way to the end [ 7 additional minutes]. This ends at Busch Campus Drive. Take a left and Walk a few steps to the corner of Busch Campus Drive and Sutphen Road. [the street sign just says "Campus Drive"]. Cross [Busch] Campus Drive at the crosswalk (carefully! the stupid cars go very fast and do not even slow down for you, even though they are supposed to give you the right of way) and make a left. Continue (after a few minutes past a traffic circle) onto Frelinghuysen Rd., and arive at Hill Center (6 minutes). [OLD WAY: (be careful when you cross River Rd) Follow that path. It ends at Johnson Drive. (about 5 minutes) Make a right on Johnson Drive. Keep walking until you hit Landing Lane (3 minutes) after crossing Landing Lane (carefully!) make a right, staying on Landing Lane. Walk on the shoulder until you hit the light at River Rd. (2 minutes). Push the button for crossing. When the light turns GREEN, Cross carefully (watching the cars that are turning left, it is your right of way, but you still have to be careful, the light is very short and the cars are impatient.) Now you are at the beginning of a steep uphill path that leads to the Stadium. You hit the Stadium at the Hale Center. (3 minutes) After you hit the stadium at Hale Center, walk on the sidewalk along the stadium. At the North Entrance, cross Sutphen Road on the crosswalk (carefully!), and make a left (1.5 minutes) After less than a minute you hit FITCH Rd., make a right on Fitch. On your left you will have a Golf course, and on your right you have first D-field and behind it the Busch Bubble, and later Yurack Field. At Yurack Field, Fitch Rd. continues to the right. Instead of turning right, keep going straight, still with the Golf course to your left, and Yurack Field on the right. You can see Hill Center at the top of the Hill. Walk to the end of that path (it ends at Parking Lot 53A), until you hit Frelinghuysen. Turn left, and after a few seconds cross Frelinghuysen at the crosswalk. (8 minutes)]

Advising

During the first year of graduate studies, students are mainly focused on taking classes, preparing for the written qualifying exam and adjusting to graduate student life at Rutgers. During the second year students are focused on identifying potential research areas and advisors, and preparing for the oral qualifying exam. The graduate program mentoring committee consists of faculty members who are each assigned a group of entering students. The assignment of mentors to students is not necessarily based on research interests. Rather the mentor is available to the student to discuss concerns that arise during the first years, and to help the student make contacts with potential research advisors. The graduate program director also serves a general advising role for all students. The assignment of mentors to students should not bound students to limit their interaction with other faculty members in any way;  we courage students to establish their own informal mentoring relationships with additional faculty. You may find useful information in the handbook How to get the mentoring you want, published by the graduate school of the University of Michigan. Both the graduate director and graduate ombudsperson are available to hear and address concerns, complaints and appeals arising from faculty-student or student-student interactions.  Note that faculty including the ombudsperson have legal obligations to report instances of harassment, assault or misconduct; see http://compliance.rutgers.edu/Title-ix/ and https://uec.rutgers.edu/.   Confidential resources, that is, people in the university who are not obligated to share any personally identifying information about a report of sexual violence (such as the survivor or accused’s name) with law enforcement, the Title IX Coordinator, or any other University administrator,  are listed here: http://compliance.rutgers.edu/resources/studentresources/confidential-resources/ In the case of grade appeals for graduate courses, a student must submit a written complaint about a final course grade to the math department's graduate ombudsperson no later than four weeks after the end of the exam period for that term.  The graduate ombudsperson will appoint a committee of graduate faculty members to evaluate the merits of the complaint.  The decision reached by the committee is considered the decision of the department.    For the current mentoring committee and graduate ombudsperson, see the department committee membership page. Graduate Faculty research-by-area pages

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Alumni and Alumnae Selected Profiles

Alumni and Alumnae of the Rutgers and Douglass Math Programs and Former Faculty Interested in what you can do with, or in spite of, a degree in mathematics? The following are a few publicly-available profiles of Rutgers and Douglass math graduates and former faculty. Selected Profiles of Alumni and Alumnae of the Rutgers and Douglass Undergraduate Math Program Allan Borodin of the University of Toronto is "the recipient of the 2008 CRM-Fields-PIMS Prize, in recognition of his exceptional achievement. Professor Borodin is a world leader in the mathematical foundations of computer science. His influence on theoretical computer science has been enormous, and its scope very broad. Jon Kleinberg, winner of the 2006 Nevanlinna Prize, writes of Borodin, "he is one of the few researchers for whom one can cite examples of impact on nearly every area of theory, and his work is characterized by a profound taste in choice of problems, and deep connections with broader issues in computer science." Allan Borodin has made fundamental contributions to many areas, including algebraic computations, resource tradeoffs, routing in interconnection networks, parallel algorithms, online algorithms, and adversarial queuing theory. Professor Borodin received his B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1963, his M.S. in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science in 1966 from Stevens Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University in 1969. From http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/press/07-08/071206.borodin.html . Simeon DeWitt "was the first math major at Rutgers. He became General George Washington's Chief Geographer in the Revolutionary War. His maps of Yorktown helped win the final battle of that war. Afterwards (1784-1834) he was the Surveyor General for New York State; he helped to plan the Erie Canal, and to develop the grid system of streets and avenues in New York City, among other things."  https://www.math.uh.edu/~tomforde/famous.html Inessa Epstein earned a Ph.D. in Mathematics at UCLA and won the Sacks Prize for recognition for the best dissertation in the field of mathematical logic worldwide in 2008. From https://www.linkedin.com/in/inessa-epstein-ph-d-b0a92914 . Lorraine Fesq is "the Chief Technologist for the Systems Engineering and Formulation Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology. She leads NASA's Fault Management Community of Practice and co-leads the NASA Software Architecture Review Board. She recently spearheaded the development of the NASA Fault Management Handbook. Lorraine has contributed to over a dozen spacecraft projects and held a teaching and research position in MIT's Aeronautics/Astronautics Department. Lorraine holds two patents and has received numerous awards, including NASA's Public Service Medal and NASA's Exceptional Achievement Honor Award. She received the BA in Mathematics from Rutgers University and the MS and PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Los Angeles." https://saturn2016.sched.org/speaker/lorraine_fesq.1uuuhx7u Milton Friedman graduated from Rutgers University in 1932 with a bachelor degree in Mathematics. Milton Friedman was awarded the 1976 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics "for his achievements in the fields of consumption analysis, monetary history and theory and for his demonstration of the complexity of stabilization policy." The year after, he retired from the University of Chicago to become a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. In 1988, after joining President Ronald Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board, he was awarded the National Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of Freedom." From https://econwikis-mborg.wikispaces.com/Milton+Friedman Karla L. Hoffman received "her B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1969, and an M.B.A. and Doctor of Science in Operations Research from George Washington University in 1971 and 1975, respectively. She is a Full Professor in the Systems Engineering and Operations Research Department and served as Chair of the department for five years ending in 2001. Previously, she worked as a mathematician in the Operations Department of the Center for Applied Mathematics of the National Institute of Standards and Technology where she served as a consultant to a variety of government agencies. Dr. Hoffman has many publications in the fields of auction theory and optimization as well as a variety of publications detailing her applied work. .... Dr. Hoffman's primary area of research is combinatorial optimization and combinatorial auction design as well software development and testing. She has developed scheduling algorithms for the airline and trucking industries, developed capital budgeting software for the telecommunications industry, and consults to the Federal Communications Commission on combinatorial auction design and software development." https://seor.vse.gmu.edu/~khoffman/ Jean-Michelet Jean-Michel "was born in Petit-Goave, Haiti where he received his baccalaureat (high school diploma) in 1985. He then received his B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1993 and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Brown University in 2002. His research interests are in the fields of differential equations and dynamical systems. https://www.linkedin.com/in/jean-michelet-jean-michel-52346320/ Matt Kohut is currently teaching mathematics at A.E. Wright Middle School in Calabasas, California. After graduating with his bachelors degree in mathematics from Rutgers University, Matt attended law school at the Rutgers School of Law - Camden. Subsequently, he clerked for the Honorable Joseph F. Lisa, Presiding Judge of the New Jersey Appellate Division, and worked as an attorney for the firm of Feintuch, Porwich and Feintuch. He then decided to return to mathematics through the Math for America fellowship program. Elizabeth Ricci (VirMedica) is an "accomplished global software executive with a proven track record in engineering, project management and product development, with an emphasis on quality, timeliness and customer success. In her prior engagement as VP of engineering for PHT Corporation, she was responsible for all core products and was instrumental in rolling out the company's next generation technologies. Prior positions include senior VP, products at Kadient, Inc., and senior VP, global products at Authoria, Inc. Elizabeth holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University and a M.S. in Mathematics from Northeastern University." From http://virmedica.com/category/press-release/ Stephen Rosen is a "Managing Director at FTI Consulting and is based in New York. He is a member of the Insurance and Pension group in the Forensic and Litigation Consulting segment and heads the Pension practice. ..... Mr. Rosen's work includes the design, implementation, and administration of all forms of qualified employee benefit plans .... Mr. Rosen holds a B.A. in mathematics from Rutgers University. He completed coursework in business administration from the Wharton School of Business and actuarial science from the University of Iowa." from http://www.fticonsulting.com/our-people/stephen-h-rosen. Timothy Rudderow "co-founded Mount Lucas in 1986 and is the firm's president, overseeing all of its activities. He has been in the investment business since the late 1970s, when he worked at Commodities Corporation with the late Frank Vannerson, another co-founder of Mount Lucas. Tim specializes in the design and management of technical trading systems applied to the futures, equity, and fixed income markets. He holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University and an M.B.A. in Management Analysis from Drexel University." https://www.mtlucas.com/OurTeam.aspx?content=BioPrincipals Jeffrey Rubin is Professor in the Department of Economics at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research New Brunswick Campus. "His research is focused on health economics including the impact of health insurance on use of care. He also has served on a subcommittee on the Governor's Commission that examined the situation facing hospitals in New Jersey, and has published papers on the costs of mental illness and the economic consequences of spinal cord injury. Rubin received his B.A. in mathematics from Rutgers College and his Ph.D. from Duke University." http://urwebsrv.rutgers.edu/experts/index.php?a=display&f=expert&id=1465. Emily Sergel graduated from SAS-Rutgers in 2011. She has been included in the inaugural class of winners of the Dissertation Award of the Association for Women in Mathematics. Emily completed her PhD at UCSD in 2016 and then an NSF Postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania. She is now back at Rutgers as an Assistant Teaching Professor of mathematics. Larry Sher is "a member of the actuarial consulting team and part of the senior leadership for October Three. Larry also is head of [their] dispute resolution practice, which provides support to clients in disputes related to their retirement plans, both in litigation and otherwise. .... Larry received a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University. He has been a Board Member and Vice-Chair of the Actuarial Standards Board, the group that establishes actuarial standards of practice for all US actuaries. Larry has also been on the Boards of the American Academy of Actuaries and the Conference of Consulting Actuaries, and was recently President of the Conference. Larry has written several articles on cash balance and other defined benefit plan issues and is a frequent speaker at industry and professional seminars." from http://www.octoberthree.com/who-we-are/larry-sher Robert L. Strawderman, joined Cornell in 2000, and previously a faculty member in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan. "His major research area is survival analysis, a branch of statistics that deals with characterizing the time until an event, such as the death of an organism or the failure of a machine, occurs. Professor Strawderman's particular research interests lie in the study of events that can recur, such heart attacks or epidemics. He collaborates extensively with subject matter specialists in applying these and other statistical methods to problems in health services, cardiology, epidemiology, demography, and veterinary medicine. Strawderman is on the faculty of two departments at Cornell, Biological Statistics and Computational Biology (BSCB) and Statistical Science..... Strawderman has a BA in Mathematics from Rutgers." https://www.orie.cornell.edu/news/index.cfm?news_id=62175&news_back=category%3D62137 Jeffrey E. Steif Professor and winner of the Eva and Lars Gardings prize in Mathematics. Department of Mathematics Chalmers University of Technology. http://www.chalmers.se/CV/steif.pdf Tony Trongone joined Pemberton Township Schools as Superintendent [of Schools] in July, 2015. Before coming to Pemberton he served as superintendent of schools for Berlin Borough and Gibbsboro Public Schools, a post he held for five years. His previous experience includes serving as district supervisor of curriculum and instruction for Cherry Hill Public Schools, supervisor of mathematics for Gloucester City School District, and secondary mathematics teacher at Northern Burlington Regional High School in Columbus, NJ. Trongone earned his master's degree in Educational Administration from Wilmington University and his BA in Mathematics from Rutgers University. He prescribes to the theory of high challenge with high support, believing all students can learn and it is the responsibility of educators to support students in reaching their fullest potential. He is committed to providing Pemberton students with a rigorous instructional program and multiple pathways to college and career readiness. He is currently a Trustee for the New Jersey School Board Insurance Group and has served as president-elect of the Association of Mathematics Teachers of New Jersey. His other professional memberships include the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Staff Development Council and the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, among others." From http://www.pemberton.k12.nj.us/administration/ Michael Yatauro is on the faculty at PSU-Brandywine. He earned "a B.A. in mathematics from Rutgers University, an M.A. in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Yatauro views mathematics as a form of artistic expression and a scientific tool of great utility. His primary research is in the field of graph theory. In particular, he is interested in determining structural aspects of a graph by studying its degree sequence. ...." from http://brandywine.psu.edu/person/michael-yatauro Selected Alumni/Alumnae of the Graduate Program Roy Goldman is former Chief Actuary at Humana Inc.  http://press.humana.com/press-release/current-releases/humana-names-roy-goldman-vice-president-and-chief-actuary. William "Brit" Kirwan is Chancellor Emeritus of the University System of Maryland. He is a nationally recognized authority on critical issues shaping the higher education landscape. Prior to his 13 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland, Kirwan served as president of Ohio State University, president of the University of Maryland, College Park, and as a member of the University of Maryland faculty. He is a sought-after speaker on a wide range of topics, including access and affordability, cost containment, diversity, innovation, higher education's role in economic development, and academic transformation. Along with his national and international presentations on key issues, he has authored many articles on issues in higher education and has been profiled and cited in academic and mainstream publications. Currently, he chairs the National Research Council Board of Higher Education and Workforce and is past chair of the boards of the Business-Higher Education Forum, the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities (APLU), the American Council for Education (ACE), and the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Among other honors, he is the recipient of the 2009 Carnegie Corporation Academic Leadership Award and the 2010 TIAA Theodore Hesburgh Leadership Excellence Award. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. From http://agb.org/bios/william-e-kirwan .  Camelia Pop "received her Ph.D. in mathematics from Rutgers University in 2012. She was a Hans Rademacher Instructor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Pennsylvania from 2012­-15. Her research interests are in partial differential equations and stochastic processes, including applications to population genetics and mathematical finance." From https://cse.umn.edu/r/new-college-of-science-and-engineering-faculty-for-2015-16/. Emilie Purvine "completed her B.S. in Mathematics from University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2006 and Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers University, New Jersey, in 2011. Emilie then joined PNNL as a Postdoc doing work on semantic knowledge systems and graph theory. She became a permanent staff scientist in November of 2012 and continues to work on graph theory and discrete math applied to cyber security and the power grid. Recently, Emilie has also begun work on applying methods from algebraic topology to information integration and evolution of cyber systems." From http://cybersecurity.pnnl.gov/principalinvestigators.stm. Zoltan Szabo is a Professor of mathematics at Princeton University. With Peter Ozsvath he created Heegaard Floer homology, a homology theory for 3-manifolds. For this contribution to the field of topology, Ozsvath and Szabo were awarded the 2007 Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry. They received Ph.D.'s from Rutgers University in 1994. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Ozsv%C3%A1th and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zolt%C3%A1n_Szab%C3%B3_(mathematician). Noriko Yui is "a professor of mathematics at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. A native of Japan, Yui obtained her B.S. from Tsuda College, and her Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1974 under the supervision of Richard Bumby. Known internationally, Yui has been a visiting researcher at the Max-Planck-Institute in Bonn a number of times and a Bye-Fellow at Newnham College, University of Cambridge. Her research is based in arithmetic geometry with applications to mathematical physics and notably mirror symmetry. Currently, much of her work is focused upon the modularity of Calabi-Yau threefolds. .... Professor Yui has been the managing editor for the journal "Communications in Number Theory and Mathematical Physics" since its inception in 2007. She has edited a number of monographs, and she has co-authored two books." from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noriko_Yui. Select Former Faculty of the Rutgers Mathematics Department Daniel E. Gorenstein (January 1, 1923 to August 26, 1992) was an American mathematician. He earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Harvard University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1950 under Oscar Zariski, introducing in his dissertation a duality principle for plane curves that motivated Grothendieck's introduction of Gorenstein rings. He was a major influence on the classification of finite simple groups. After teaching mathematics to military personnel at Harvard before earning his doctorate, Gorenstein held posts at Clark University and Northeastern University before he began teaching at Rutgers University in 1969, where he remained for the rest of his life. He was the founding director of DIMACS in 1989, and remained as its director until his death. Gorenstein was awarded many honors for his work on finite simple groups. He was recognised, in addition to his own research contributions such as work on signalizer functors, as a leader in directing the classification proof, the largest collaborative piece of pure mathematics ever attempted. In 1972 he was a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fulbright Scholar; in 1978 he gained membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 1989 won the Steele Prize for mathematical exposition." from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Gorenstein. Helmut Hofer is "a German-American mathematician, one of the founders of the area of symplectic topology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and the recipient of the 1999 Ostrowski Prize and the 2013 Heinz Hopf Prize. Since 2009, he is a faculty member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He currently works on symplectic geometry, dynamical systems, and partial differential equations. His contributions to the field include Hofer geometry." From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmut_Hofer Jane Scanlon "received her doctorate from the University of Michigan in 1949 under the direction of Erich H. Rothe. After two postdoctoral fellowships, from the Office of Naval Research and the University of Michigan, she worked as a mathematician in the Air Force and for the American Optical Company, and as an instructor at Wheaton College and Stonehill College. In 1957, she moved to the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, and in 1965 took a position as professor at Rutgers University. She became professor emeritus in 1991. She was awarded a Visiting Professorship for Women from the National Science Foundation to spend the 1984-1985 year at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. At the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Boulder in August 1989, she presented the Pi Mu Epsilon J. Sutherland Frame Lecture. Scanlon's research has focused on mathematical biology, singular perturbation theory, and nonlinear analysis. She has published more than fifty papers, two research monographs (Fixed Points and Topological Degree in Nonlinear Analysis and Mathematical Aspects of Hodgkin-Huxley Neural Theory), as well as a textbook (Differential Equations: Introduction and Qualitative Theory)." From http://www.awm-math.org/noetherbrochure/Scanlon85.html Thomas Spencer is Professor in the School of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He "has made major contributions to the theory of phase transitions and the study of singularities at the transition temperature. In special cases, he and his collaborators have proved universality at the transition temperature. Spencer has also worked on partial differential equations with stochastic coefficients, especially localization theory. He is presently developing a mathematical theory of supersymmetric path integrals to study the quantum dynamics of a particle in random media. His other interests include random matrices, chaotic behavior of dynamical systems, and nonequilibrium theories of turbulence." https://www.ias.edu/scholars/spencer.    

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Ph.D. Recipients, 1950 - Present

Mathematics Graduate Program Most Recent Graduates 47 graduates 2020-present 69 graduates 2015-2019 58 graduates 2010-2014 43 graduates 2005-2009 43 graduates 2000-2004 72 graduates 1995-1999 66 graduates 1990-1994 75 graduates 1980-1989 107 graduates 1970-1979 39 graduates 1961-1969 7 graduates 1950-1960 A count of doctorates by year Information about past Rutgers MSc. recipients can be found here. Pre-history: Rutgers created a postgraduate study program in 1870, in order to award a certificate to people who took an extra undergraduate course after graduation. Graduate courses formally appeared in 1876. While taking such courses, graduate students were often appointed as a "Tutor in Mathematics"; this was the forerunner of the modern Teaching Assistant. About 10 people received a Masters degree in Mathematics during the era 1870-1906. When the Mathematics department was formally organized in 1906, it stopped admitting graduate students. The first MSc degrees in Mathematics were awarded to James Barton (BSc 1871; Tutor 1873-74; MSc 1874) and Albert S. Cook (BSc 1872; Tutor 1872-73; MSc 1875). Other masters degrees were awarded to men who went on to become professors at Rutgers: Alfred Titsworth (MSc 1880); Robert Prentiss (MSc 1881); William Breazeale (MSc 1895); and Richard Morris (MSc 1902). The Mathematics Department had other graduate students of this type in the 1890's including: DeWitt, Scattergood (MSc 1997), VanDyck Jr. (AM 1899). In 1929, a new Masters degree in Mathematics was created, requiring 8 courses and a written thesis. The first such degree was awarded in 1930 to Charles Eason. The first woman to receive a M.Sc. degree in Math was Eveline Stevens in 1934 (NJC '32). !-- Ruth Berkow in 1936. --> Professors Brasefield and Starke were the advisors for most of these students; their Masters theses may be inspected in Rutgers' Math Library. There were 9 MSc degrees granted during the 1930's, and 50 MSc degrees granted during 1940-1959. The modern era: Although the Rutgers doctoral program was created in 1882, and the first PhD awarded in 1884, a doctoral program in mathematics was not organized at Rutgers until 1947. The first Ph.D. in Mathematics at Rutgers was awarded in 1951, to George Cherlin (Rutgers College '47, MSc '49). A total of 7 Ph.D.s were awarded before 1961, when the modern era began at Rutgers. Under Ken Wolfson (chair 1961-1975) the graduate program in mathematics gradually built up to a steady graduation rate of 13 doctorates per year in the mid-1970's. It later shrank in the 1980's and then expanded again in the 1990's, reaching a high of 19 doctorates in 1995. With the economic downturn in the mid-1990's, fewer students were accepted into the program, with the delayed effect that the number of doctorates has shrunk since 2000.   Number of doctorates per decade: 1950's 1960's 1970's 1980's 1990's 2000's 2010's 5 41 107 75 138 93 127   2020's             12              Rutgers Math Phd's 1951-Present  NameGraduatedAdvisorFirst job after RU 2020-present:12 Ph.D's TOP   Kenneth Alex Dowling Jan 2024 Konstantin Mischaikow     Victoria Chayes Oct 2023 Eric Carlen, Michael Kiessling ICR, Inc., Aurora, CO   George Hauser Oct 2023 Stephen Miller     Cesar Ramirez Ibanez Oct 2023 Joel Lebowitz, Eric Carlen     Blair Seidler Oct 2023 Doron Zeilberger Fair Lawn High School, Fair Lawn, NJ   Tamar Blanks May 2023 Daniel Krashen Fordham University, New York, NY   Yael Davidov May 2023 Daniel Krashen University of Delaware, Newark, DE   Louis Gaudet May 2023 Henryk Iwaniec University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA   Surya Teja Gavva May 2023 Karthik Srikanta CUNY, New York   James Holland May 2023 Grigor Sargsyan Epic Systems, Hosting Division, Verona, WI   Doyon Kim May 2023 Stephen Miller Mathematical Inst of Univ of Bonn, Germany   Doanh The Pham May 2023 Yanyan Li     Xiaoxu Wu May 2023 Avy Soffer Texas A&M University, College Station, TX   Corrine Yap May 2023 Bhargav Narayanan Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA   Takehiko Gappo Oct  2022 Grigor Sargsyan TU Vienna, Vienna, Austria   Andy Huynh Oct  2022 Hongbin Sun     Edna Jones Oct 2022 Alex Kontorovich Duke University, Durham, NC   Rory Martin-Hagemeyer Oct 2022 Natasa Sesum University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA   Weihong Xu Oct 2022 Anders Buch Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA   Xindi Zhang Oct 2022 Chris Woodward DIA Associates, New York, NY   Vernon Chan May 2022 Borisov, Lev     Parker Hund May 2022 Michael Kiessling Raytheon, Missile and Defense, Tucson, AZ   Alexander Karlovitz May 2022 Alex Kontorovich Lockheed Martin Space, King of Prussia, PA   Heejin Lee May 2022 Fioralba Cakoni Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN   Jason Saied May 2022 Siddhartha Sahi KBR, Inc. at NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA   Jikang Wang May 2022 Xiaochun Rong Fields Institute, Toronto, Ontario   Yuxuan Yang May 2022 Jozsef Beck     Zhu, Xiaoping May 2022 Feng Luo Stony Brook University, NY   Matthew Hohertz Jan 2022 Paul Feehan     Jeaheang Bang May  2021 Yanyan Li University of Texas at San Antonio   Marco Castronovo May 2021 Chris Woodward Columbia University, NY   Xiao Chen May 2021 Kasper Larsen     Han Lu May 2021 Yanyan LI University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada   Brooke Ogrodnik May 2021 Alex Kontorovich Metron, Inc., Reston, VA   Zhuolun Yang May 2021  Yanyan Li Brown University, Providence, RI   Eric deAmorim Jan 2021 Michael Kiessling/Shadi Abdoire Tahvildar-Zadeh Universität zu Köln, Cologne, Germany   John Chiarelli Oct 2020 Michael Saks AoPs Academy Princeton, NJ   Keith Frankston Oct 2020 Jeffry Kahn Center for Communications Research, Princeton, NJ   Saurabh Gosavi Oct 2020 Daniel Krashen Bar Ilan University, Israel   Mingjia Yang Oct 2020 Doron Zeilberger     Lun Zhang Oct 2020 Konstantin Mischaikow Kyoto University, Japan   Yonah Biers-Ariel May 2020 Doron Zeilberger Jane Street Capital, NY   Xin Fu May 2020 Jian Song University of California, Irvine, CA   Jinyoung Park May 2020 Jeffry Kahn Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ   Justin Semonsen May 2020 Swastik Kopparty Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., San Diego, CA   Chloe Wawrzyniak May 2020 Xiaojun Huang University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY   Chengxi Wang May 2020 Lev Borisov University of California, Los Angeles, CA   Yukun Yao May 2020 Doron Zeilberger Goldman Sachs, NY 2015-2019: 69 Ph.D's TOP   Kelly Spendlove Oct 2019 Konstantin Mischaikow University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute,Oxford, England   Michael Breeling May 2019 Avy Soffer University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada   Matthew Charnley May 2019 Michael Vogelius Rutgers University, NJ   Joel Clingempeel May 2019 Gregory Moore  Google, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA   William Cole Franks May 2019 Michael Saks Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA   Alejandro Ginory May 2019 Siddhartha Sahi University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada   Abigail Raz May 2019 Jeffry Kahn University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE   Daniel Scheinerman May 2019 Swastik Kopparty Center for Communications Research, Princeton, NJ   Matthew Welsh May 2019 Henryk Iwaniec University of Bristol, England   Rebecca Coulson Jan 2019 Gregory Cherlin United States Military Academy, West Point, NY   Johannes Flake Oct 2018 Siddhartha Sahi Lehrstulh B fur Mathematik, Germany   Katie McKeon Oct 2018 Alex Kontorovich Center for Communications Research, Princeton, NJ   Sijian Tang Oct 2018 Michael Saks Facebook, Inc., Seattle, WA   Zhuohui Zhang Oct 2018 Stephen Miller Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel   Semen Artamonov May 2018 Vladimir Retakh University of California, Berkeley, CA   Samuel Braunfeld May 2018 Gregory Cherlin University, of Maryland, MD   Hanlong Fang May 2018 Xiaojun Huang University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI   Bryan Ek May 2018 Doron Zeilberger Space & Naval Warfare, Hanahan, SC   Jonathan Jaquette May 2018 Konstantin Mischaikow Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, CA   Andrew Lohr May 2018 Doron Zeilberger Microsoft, WA   Jiayin Pan May 2018 Xiaochun Rong University of California, Santa Barbara, CA   Fei Qi May 2018 Yi-Zhi Huang Yale University, New Haven, CT    Anthony Zaleski May 2018 Doron Zeilberger     Ruofan Yan Jan 2018 Paul Feehan Asset Management, NY   Edmund Karasiewicz Oct 2017 Stephen Miller University of California, Santa Cruz, CA   Douglas Schultz Oct 2017 Chris Woodward Technion-Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel   Thomas Sznigir Oct 2017 M.Vogelius/H.Brezis Applied Research Associates, Inc., Raleigh, NC   Ross Berkowitz May 2017 Swastik Kopparty Yale University, CT   Sjuvon Chung May 2017 Anders Buch Ohio State University, OH   Patrick Devlin May 2017 Jeffry Kahn Yale University, CT   Michael Donders May 2017 Jozsef Beck Jane Street Capital, NY   Nathan Fox May 2017 Doron Zeilberger The College of Wooster, Ohio   Siao-Hao Guo May 2017 Natasa Sesum Indiana University, Bloomington, IN   Rachel Levanger May 2017 Konstantin Michaikow University of Pennsylvania, PA   Pedro Pontes May 2017 Henryk Iwaniec Bloomberg, NY   Liming Sun May 2017 YanYan Li Johns Hopkins University, MD   Charles Wolf May 2017 Shubhangi Saraf Ben Gurion University, Israel   Xukai Yan May 2017 YanYan Li Georgia Tech, GA   Jacob Baron Oct 2016 Jeffry Kahn Department of Defense   Timothy Naumovitz Oct 2016 Michael Saks Google, Inc., Mountainview, CA   Bence Borda May 2016 Jozsef Beck     Bud Coulson May 2016 James Lepowsky Rutgers University, NJ   Charles Wes Cowan May 2016 Michael Katehakis Rutgers University, NJ   Brian Garnett May 2016 Swastik Kopparty Rutgers University, NJ   Burak Kaya May 2016 Simon Thomas Middle East Technical University, Turkey   John Kim May 2016 Swastik Kopparty Virtu Financial, NYC   Howard Nuer May 2016 Lev Borisov Northeastern University, Boston, MA   Matthew Russell May 2016 V. Retakh/D. Zeilberger Rutgers University, NJ   Francis Seuffert May 2016 Eric Carlen University of Pennsylvania   Nathaniel Shar May 2016 Doron Zeilberger Google, Inc., CA   Tien Trinh May 2016 Stephen Miller University of Colorado Boulder, CO   Glen Wilson May 2016 Charles Weibel University of Oslo, Norway   Jianguo Xiao May 2016 Avy Soffer Quantitative Strategies at PeerIQ, NY   Edward Chien Oct 2015 Feng Luo Bar-Ilan University, Israel   Manuel Larenas Oct 2015 Avy Soffer JRI Ingenieria Consulting Firm, Chile   Zahra Aminzare May 2015 Eduardo Sontag Princeton University, Princeton, NJ   Francesco Fiordalisi May 2015 Yi-Zhi Huang/James Lepowsky Bloomberg LP, Princeton, NJ   Bin Guo May 2015 Jian Song Columbia University, New York, NY   Simao Herdade May 2015 Endre Szemeredi Clarifai, Inc., NY   Moulik Kallupalam Balasubramanian May 2015 Shadi AbdoireTahvildar-Zadeh Rutgers University, NJ   Shashank Kanade May 2015 James Lepowsky University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada   Vladimir Lubyshev May 2015 Paul Feehan Cubist Systematic Strategies, LLC, NY   John Miller May 2015 Henryk Iwaniec John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD   Kellen Myers May 2015 Doron Zeilberger Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY   Ming Xiao May 2015 Xiaojun Huang University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   Justin Bush Jan 2015 Konstantin Mischaikow Palantir Technologies, Inc. NY   Jaret Flores Jan 2015 Charles Weibel GIS Workshop, Inc., Lincoln, NE   Justin Gilmer Jan 2015 Michael Saks Bloomberg LP, NY   Thomas Tyrrell Jan 2015 Jerrold Tunnell Infosys, Basking Ridge, NJ 2010-2014: 58 Ph.D.'s TOP   James Dibble Oct 2014 Xiaochun Rong Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL   Jorge Cantillo Oct 2014 Henryk Iwaniec Assurant Solutions, Miami, FL   MichaelMarcondes de Freitas Oct 2014 Eduardo Sontag University of Copenhagen, Denmark   Aaron Hamm Oct 2014 Jeffry Kahn Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC   Debajyoti Nandi Oct 2014 Robert Wilson Chennai Mathematical Institute, India   Kathleen Crow Craig May 2014 Eric Carlen UCLA, Los Angeles, CA   Ved Datar May 2014 Jian Song University of Notre Dame, IN   Knight Fu May 2014 Charles Weibel MediaMath, Boston, MA   Zhan Li May 2014 Lev Borisov John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD   Robert McRae May 2014 James Lepowsky Beijing Int'l. Center for Math Research, China   Yusra Naqvi May 2014 Siddhartha Sahi Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA   Eduardo Osorio Triana May 2014 Paul Feehan Bloomberg LP, NY   Christopher Sadowski May 2014 Lepowsky / YZ Huang Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA   Matthew Samuel May 2014 Anders Buch Prudential Investment Management   Jinwei Yang May 2014 Lepowsky / YZ Huang University of Notre Dame, IN   Hui Wang Jan 2014 Haim Brezis JP Morgan, NY     Brandon Bate Oct 2013 Stephen Miller Tel Aviv University (Israel)   Susovan Pal Oct 2013 Feng Luo / Jun Hu University of Paris 11   Vijay Ravikumar Oct 2013 Anders Buch Tata Institute for Fundamental Research (India)   Yu Wang Oct 2013 Michael Kiessling     David Duncan May 2013 Chris Woodward Michigan State University   Susan Durst May 2013 Robert Wilson University of Arizona   Ali Maalaoui May 2013 Abbas Bahri Universitat Basel (Switzerland)   Brian Nakamura May 2013 Doron Zeilberger CCICADA   Priyam Patel May 2013 Feng Luo Purdue University   Ke Wang May 2013 Van Vu IMA (University of Minnesota)   Yunpeng Wang May 2013 YanYan Li AMSS, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Beijing)   Tian Yang May 2013 Feng Luo Stanford University     Hernan Castro Oct 2012 H. Brezis Universidad De Talga   Robert DeMarco Oct 2012 J. Kahn CCICADA   Vidit Nanda Oct 2012 K. Mischaikow University of Pennsylvania   Catherine Pfaff Oct 2012 L. Mosher Laboratory Analysis of Topology and Probabilities, Aix Marseille Universite/CNRS   Susmita Venugopalan Oct 2012 C. Woodward Tata Institute of Fundamental Research   John Bryk May 2012 J. Tunnell John Jay College (CUNY)   Tianling Jin May 2012 Y. Li University of Chicago   Elizabeth Kupin May 2012 J. Beck NSA   Camelia Pop May 2012 P. Feehan University of Pennsylvania   Nicholas Trainor May 2012 M. Vogelius Numerix LLC (NYC)   Jay Williams May 2012 S. Thomas California Institute of Technology     V.S. Padmini Mukkamala October 2011 J. Pack and M. Szegedy McDaniel college, Hungary; then IIT, India   Amit Priyadarshi October 2011 R. Nussbaum Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi   Andrew Baxter May 2011 D. Zeilberger Penn State University   Gabriel Bouch May 2011 E. Carlen Freedom Church, Philadelphia   Emilie Hogan May 2011 D. Zeilberger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory   Brent Young May 2011 M. Kiessling Rutgers University; Cologne University (Germany)   Linh Tran Jan 2011 V. Vu University of Washington     Nan Li Oct 2010 X. Rong University of Notre Dame   Jin Wang Oct 2010 P. Feehan Ernst & Young LLP   Yuan Yuan Oct 2010 X. Huang John Hopkins University   Sara Blight May 2010 H. Iwaniec National Security Agency at Fort Meade   Goran Djankovic May 2010 H. Iwaniec Mathematical Institute of the Serbian Academy of Arts and Sciences   Liviu Ilinca May 2010 J. Kahn Indiana University   Hoi Nguyen May 2010 V. Vu University of Pennsylvania   Wesley Pegden May 2010 J. Beck NYU (Courant Institute), NSF Postdoc   Daniel Staley May 2010 S. Ferry Yodle, Inc.   Paul Ellis Jan 2010 S. Thomas University of Connecticut   Jawon Koo Jan 2010 P. Feehan South Korea   Ming Shi Jan 2010 P. Feehan Ernst & Young LLP 2005-2009: 50 Ph.D.'s TOP   Ila Leigh Cobbs Oct 2009 L. Carbone Lebanon Valley College   Paul Raff Oct 2009 D. Zeilberger Rutgers University   Reza Rezazadegan Oct 2009 C. Woodward Aarhus University   Thomas Robinson Oct 2009 J. Lepowsky Rutgers University   Scott Schneider Oct 2009 S. Thomas Wesleyan University   Biao Yin Oct 2009 Y. Li University of Connecticut   Yuan Zhang Oct 2009 X. Huang UCSD   Philip M. Wood May 2009 V. Vu NSF Postdoc, UCLA, then Stanford University   Eric Rowland May 2009 D. Zeilberger Tulane University   Luc Nguyen May 2009 Y. Li Univ. of Oxford   Michael Neiman May 2009 J. Kahn Univ. of California   Ian Levitt May 2009 E. Szemeredi Federal Aviation Administration   Liming Wang Oct. 2008 E. Sontag U.C. Irvine   Sikimeti Ma'u Oct. 2008 C. Woodward Massachusetts Institute of Technology   Thotsaporn Thanatipanonda Oct. 2008 D. Zeilberger Dickinson College   Ellen (Shiting) Bao May 2008 Y. Li University of Minnesota   Sam Coskey May 2008 S. Thomas CUNY   Colleen Duffy May 2008 R. Wilson U. Wisconsin-Eau Claire   Ren Guo May 2008 F. Luo University of Minnesota   Lara Pudwell May 2008 D. Zeilberger Valparaiso University   Jared Speck May 2008 M. Kiessling/S. Tahvildar-Zadeh Princeton University   Chris Stucchio Jan. 2008 A. Soffer Courant Institute (NSF postdoc)   Derek Hansen Jan. 2008 M. Vogelius Rice University   Kevin Costello Oct. 2007 V. Vu Institute for Advanced Study   Benjamin Kennedy Oct. 2007 R. Nussbaum Gettysburg College   Brian Lins Oct. 2007 R. Nussbaum Dickinson College   Sujith Vijay May 2007 J. Beck Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   Michael Weingart May 2007 F. Knop Rutgers-New Brunswick   Haoyuan Xu May 2007 Y. Li Univ. of Connecticut     Corina Calinescu Oct. 2006 J. Lepowsky Ohio State Univ.   William Cuckler Oct. 2006 J. Kahn Univ. of Delaware   Thuy Pham Oct. 2006 W. Vasconcelos Univ. of Toronto   Moa Apagodu May 2006 D. Zeilberger Virginia Commonwealth Univ.   Satadal Ganguly May 2006 H. Iwaniec Inst. of Mathematical Sciences, India   Roman Holowinsky May 2006 H. Iwaniec The Inst. for Advanced Study   Qinian Jin May 2006 Y. Li Univ. of Texas   Rich Mikula May 2006 Y. Li William Paterson Univ.   Vincent Vatter Jan. 2006 D. Zeilberger Univ. of St. Andrews, Scotland     German Enciso Oct. 2005 E. Sontag Math Biology Inst., Ohio State Univ.   Liang Kong Oct. 2005 Y.-Z. Huang Max Planck Inst. & IHES (Bures)   David Nacin Oct. 2005 R. Wilson William Paterson Univ.   Sasa Radomirovic Oct. 2005 J. Tunnell Univ. of Trondheim, Norway   Nick Weininger Oct. 2005 J. Kahn Google Inc, Mountain View   Kia Dalili May 2005 W. Vasconcelos Dalhousie Univ.   Aaron Lauve May 2005 V. Retakh Univ. of Quebec, Montreal   Kai Medville May 2005 M. Vogelius Inst. for Math. and its Applications, Minneapolis   Augusto Ponce May 2005 H. Brezis Inst. for Advanced Study & Univ. of Paris   Yongzhong Xu May 2005 A. Bahri NYU (Courant Inst.)   Laura Ciobanu Jan. 2005 C. Sims CRM Barcelona   Eva Curry Jan. 2005 R. Gundy Dalhousie Univ. 2000-2004: 43 Ph.D.'s TOP   Pieter Blue Oct. 2004 A. Soffer Univ. of Toronto   Jeff Burdges Oct. 2004 G. Cherlin Univ. Wurzburg, Germany   Raju Chelluri Oct. 2004 H. Iwaniec Deceased   Stephen Hartke Oct. 2004 F. Roberts Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign   Xiaoqing Li Oct. 2004 H. Iwaniec Columbia Univ.   Alfredo Rios Oct. 2004 R. Gundy Lehigh Univ.   Eric Sundberg Oct. 2004 J. Beck Whittier College   Klay Kruczek May 2004 J. Beck Univ. of Western Oregon   Aobing Li May 2004 Y. Li Inst. for Advanced Study and Univ. of Wisconsin   XiaoYong Li May 2004 L. Shepp Industry (Contract Research Org)   Waldeck Schutzer May 2004 S. Sahi U. Federal de Sao Carlos, Brazil   Matt Young May 2004 H. Iwaniec American Inst. of Mathematics and Stanford Univ.   Lin Zhang May 2004 J. Lepowsky Industry   Carlo Mazza Jan. 2004 C. Weibel Univ. of Paris     Rodney Biezuner Oct. 2003 Y. Li U. Minas-Gervais/Belo Horizonte, Brazil   David Radnell Oct. 2003 Y.-Z. Huang Univ. of Michigan   Malka Rosenthal Oct. 2003 M. Saks Iona College   James Taylor Oct. 2003 S. Goldstein Iowa State Univ.   Yuka Taylor Oct. 2003 C. Woodward George Washington Univ.   Madalena Chaves May 2003 E. Sontag RU/Industry   Jooyoun Hong May 2003 W. Vasconcelos Purdue Univ.   Liangyi Zhao May 2003 H. Iwaniec U.S. Military Academy (West Point)   Louis Dupaigne Jan. 2003 H. Brezis Univ. of Paris VI   Xiaodong Sun Jan. 2003 M. Saks Inst. for Advanced Study     David Galvin Oct. 2002 J. Kahn Microsoft Corp., Seattle   Takao Sakuraba May 2002 G. Goldin Rutgers   Juan Davila Jan. 2002 H. Brezis Univ. de Santiago, Chile     Brian Ingalls Oct. 2001 E. Sontag Waterloo Univ.   Antun Milas Oct. 2001 J. Lepowsky Univ. of Arizona   Yi Zhao Oct. 2001 E. Szemeredi Univ. of Illinois (Chicago)   Bernardo Abrego May 2001 J. Beck California State-Northridge   Silvia Fernandez May 2001 J. Beck California State-Northridge   Maurice Hasson May 2001 R. Gundy Univ. of Arizona   Cliff Smyth May 2001 M. Saks Carnegie Mellon and Inst. for Advanced Study   Darko Volkov May 2001 M. Vogelius NJIT   Steve Warner May 2001 S. Thomas Penn. State, Reading   Lei Zhang May 2001 Y. Li Texas A&M     Paul Dreyer Oct. 2000 F. Roberts Rand Corp.   Ryan Martin Oct. 2000 E. Szemeredi Carnegie Mellon Univ.   John Nahay May 2000 R. Cohn Monmouth Univ.   Misha Krichman Jan. 2000 E. Sontag UCLA (Mech. Eng'g.)   Yi Liu Jan. 2000 F. Luo Rutgers   Michael Malisoff Jan. 2000 H. Sussmann Washington Univ. (St. Louis)   1995-1999: 72 Ph.D.'s TOP   Dov Chelst Oct. 1999 J. Lebowitz DeVry Inst.   Terri Girardi Oct. 1999 J. Tunnell Fordham Univ.   Xin Guo Oct. 1999 L. Shepp Univ. of Alberta/IBM (Financial Statistics)   Pirkko Kuusela Oct. 1999 D. Ocone Industry (Finland)   Marco Lenci Oct. 1999 J. Lebowitz SUNY Stony Brook   Paul O'Donnell Oct. 1999 J. Komlos Drew Univ.   Sara Soffer Oct. 1999 J. Komlos Princeton HS   Yang Yu Oct. 1999 J. Kahn Cal Tech   Garikai Campbell Jan. 1999 J. Tunnell Swarthmore College   A. Kazarnovskii Krol Jan. 1999 I. Gelfand Yale Univ.   Harri Ojanen Jan. 1999 R. Wheeden Lumeo Software,Inc. Finland     Senchun Lin Oct. 1998 T. Weinstein Industry (software)   Jason Yuenger Oct. 1998 J. Taylor J. P. Morgan Stanley (Finance)   Rita Csákány May 1998 J. Kahn Technical Univ. of Budapest, Hungary   Rick Desper May 1998 M. Farach National Insitutes of Health   Tor Gunston May 1998 W. Vasconcelos EDS (Morris Plains, NJ)   Carol Hamer May 1998 J. Tunnell Airial Conseil, France   Emanuel Kowalski May 1998 H. Iwaniec Princeton Univ./Inst. for Advanced Study   Luca Mauri May 1998 M. Tierney Univ. of Como, Italy   Li Sheng (OR) May 1998 F. Roberts Drexel Univ.   Tong Tu May 1998 R. Falk Bloomberg (Financial Services Industry)   Shaoji Xu (OR) May 1998 F. Roberts Bell Labs     Amine Asselah Oct. 1997 J. Lebowitz ETH Zurich   Rodica Costin Oct. 1997 M. Kruskal Mathematical Sciences Research Inst.   Luke Higgins Oct. 1997 T. Weinstein Brigham Young Univ., Salt Lake City   Dan Kling Oct. 1997 F. Luo Rutgers-IEEE project   Wanglai Li Oct. 1997 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson Telecommunications industry   Richard Ng Oct. 1997 E. Taft Univ. of California-Santa Cruz   Dan Radulescu Oct. 1997 J. Lebowitz Industry   Luisa R. Doering May 1997 W. Vasconcelos Univ. Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil   Donna Fengya May 1997 M. Vogelius James Madison Univ.   Dave Reimer May 1997 J. Beck IAS/Trenton State   Arpad Toth May 1997 W. Duke U. Michigan   Han Zuhong May 1997 F. Treves Finance industry   Y. Chitour Jan. 1997 H. Sussmann Univ. of Pisa, Italy   Raika Dehy Jan. 1997 O. Mathieu Univ. of Strasbourg, France (ATER)   Yi Zhang Jan. 1997 S. Thomas Univ. Michigan     Katrina Barron Oct. 1996 J. Lepowsky / Y.-Z. Huang Univ. of California-Santa Cruz   Galin Georgiev Oct. 1996 J. Lepowsky Inst. for Advanced Study   M. Losada Oct. 1996 S. Thomas Antonio Narino Univ. (Colombia)   Gretchen Ostheimer Oct. 1996 C. Sims Tufts Univ.   Aleksandar Pekec Oct. 1996 F. Roberts BRICS, Denmark   Rosane Ushirobira Oct. 1996 O. Mathieu Univ. of Strasbourg, France (ATER)   Meijun Zhu Oct. 1996 Y. Li U British Columbia   Dave Anderson May 1996 J. Taylor West Point / ARL   Jim Bennett May 1996 S. Thomas Std.Commercial Lines   Tom Bohman May 1996 J. Kahn MIT/MSRI then Carnegie Mellon U.   M.J. Kelley May 1996 J. Taylor Texas A&M   Naomi Klarreich May 1996 T. Weinstein Case Western Reserve Univ.   Eddie Lo May 1996 C. Sims NSA   Shari Moskow May 1996 M. Vogelius Inst. for Math. and its Applications (Minneapolis)   John Shareshian May 1996 R. Lyons Mathematical Sciences Research Inst. (Berkeley)   J-Y Patrick Tai May 1996 P. Landweber Dartmouth       Yansong Chen Oct. 1995 A. Bahri     Ovidiu Costin Oct. 1995 J. Lebowitz / M. Kruskal   Jason Jones Oct. 1995 C. Weibel     Andrew Leahy Oct. 1995 F. Knop     Martin Strauss Oct. 1995 E. Allender     Juan Alvarez-Paiva   1995 T. Petrie     Wen-Yun Gao May 1995 J. Tunnell / D. Rohrlich   G. Giacomin May 1995 J. Lebowitz     Ying Huang May 1995 I. Daubechies / R. Wheeden   Susan Morey May 1995 W. Vasconcelos     Dale Peterson May 1995 F. Roberts     Claudia Polini   1995 W. Vasconcelos     Yasmine Sanderson May 1995 R. Wilson / O. Mathieu   Robert Smyth May 1995 T. Weinstein     Maria Vaz Pinto May 1995 W. Vasconcelos     David W. Webb May 1995 S. Chanillo / B. Muckenhoupt   Jiahai Xie May 1995 R. Goodman     Hong Guo Jan. 1995 J. Lepowsky    1990-1994: 66 Ph.D.'s TOP   A. Tuna Altınel Oct. 1994 G. Cherlin     Randall Fairman Oct. 1994 R. Lyons     Andrés Fundia Oct. 1994 M. Saks     Mark Kayll Oct. 1994 J. Kahn     Renee Koplon Oct. 1994 E. Sontag     Guillaume Sanje-Mpacko Oct. 1994 L. Corwin / R. Goodman   Jim Sharp Oct. 1994 S. Thomas     Todd Trimble Oct. 1994 M. Tierney     Rob Hochberg May 1994 J. Beck     Elizabeth Jurisich May 1994 R. Wilson / J. Lepowsky   Haisheng Li May 1994 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson   Guotian Lin May 1994 A. Kupiainen     András Pluhár May 1994 J. Beck (RUTCOR)     András Stipzicz May 1994 T. Petrie     Zoltán Szabó May 1994 T. Petrie     Chuanfu Xie May 1994 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson   Sergio Zani Jan. 1994 R. Wheeden       Francesca Albertini Oct. 1993 E. Sontag     Jeong Han Kim Oct. 1993 J. Kahn     Junjie Xiong Oct. 1993 P. Hansen     Yudi Yang Oct. 1993 H. Sussmann     Xin Ke May 1993 J. Beck     Wenzhi Luo May 1993 H. Iwaniec     Paolo Dai Pra Jan. 1993 J. Lebowitz     Tejinder Neelon Jan. 1993 F. Treves     Hasna Riahi Jan. 1993 A. Bahri     Andrew Roosen Jan. 1993 J. Taylor       Lin Yuandan Oct. 1992 E. Sontag     Wensheng Liu Oct. 1992 H. Sussmann     Lu Xiaoyun Oct. 1992 J. Kahn     Steven Sessions Oct. 1992 P. Landweber     Tang Guoqing Oct. 1992 H. Sussmann     Ed Aboufadel May 1992 J. Cronin-Scanlon     Gábor Francsics May 1992 F. Treves     Nigel Pitt May 1992 H. Iwaniec     Denise Sakai May 1992 F. Roberts (RUTCOR)     Xueqing Tang May 1992 A. Ben-Israel (RUTCOR)     Jianming Xu May 1992 R. Falk     Xiaoping Xu May 1992 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson     Stephen Alessandrini Oct. 1991 R. Falk     Géza Bohus Oct. 1991 J. Kahn     Da-mu Cai Oct. 1991 R. Falk     Gustavo Comezana Oct. 1991 J. Shaneson     Brenda Latka Oct. 1991 G. Cherlin     Richard Rosengarten Oct. 1991 G. Cherlin     To Tze-ming Oct. 1991 N. Wallach     Barr Von Oehsen Oct. 1991 P. Landweber     Xianwen Xie Oct. 1991 R. Nussbaum     Chua Seng-Kee May 1991 R. Wheeden     Jose C. Fernandes May 1991 R. Wheeden     Linda Holt May 1991 R. M. Beals     Terry Lohrenz May 1991 F. Treves     Lu Guozhen May 1991 S. Chanillo     Chi Wang May 1991 F. Roberts (RUTCOR)       Sandra Caravella Oct. 1990 T. Petrie     Yi-Zhi Huang Oct. 1990 J. Lepowsky     Seong Joo Kang Oct. 1990 R. M. Beals     Yuan Wang Oct. 1990 E. Sontag     Glenn Hurlbert May 1990 R. Graham     Cristiano Husu May 1990 J. Lepowsky     Garth Isaak May 1990 F. Roberts (RUTCOR)     Julio Kuplinsky May 1990 P. Hansen     Peter Ostapenko May 1990 R. Goodman     J. Asmus Petersen May 1990 F. Treves     Raymond Ross May 1990 D. Rohrlich     Zangwill Rosenbaum Jan. 1990 F. Roberts     1980-1989: 75 Ph.D.'s TOP   Enriqueta Carrington Oct. 1989 N. Wallach     Andrzej Karwowski Oct. 1989 J. Lebowitz     Shari Prevost Oct. 1989 R. Wilson     Barry Tesman Oct. 1989 F. Roberts     Jan Wehr Oct. 1989 M. Aizenman     Krzysztof Wysocki Oct. 1989 R. Nussbaum     Peisen Zhang Oct. 1989 J. Lebowitz       Stefano Capparelli Oct. 1988 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson   Carlangelo Liverani Oct. 1988 J. Lebowitz     Abdelhamid Meziani Oct. 1988 F. Treves     Jean Rynes Oct. 1988 C. Weibel     Haruo Tsukuda Oct. 1988 J. Lepowsky / I. Frenkel   Suh-Ryung Kim   1988 F. Roberts   Pierluigi Frajria Jan. 1988 N. Wallach     Willi Schwarz Jan. 1988 N. Wallach       Shiferaw Berhanu Oct. 1987 F. Treves     Yves Crama Oct. 1987 P. Hammer     Beatriz de Lafferriere Oct. 1987 W. Petryshyn     Stefano Olla Oct. 1987 J. Lebowitz     David Barsky May 1987 M. Aizenman     Mark Hughes May 1987 T. Petrie     João Sampaio May 1987 T. Petrie       Gerardo Lafferriere Oct. 1986 H. Sussmann     Monica Nicolau Oct. 1986 J. Shaneson     Heinz Schaettler Oct. 1986 H. Sussmann     Carlos Videla Oct. 1986 G. Cherlin     Jim Maloney May 1986 G. Cherlin     Rafael Villareal May 1986 W. Vasconcelos     Leila Figueiredo Jan. 1986 J. Lepowsky     Marly Mandia Jan. 1986 R. Wilson     Abigail Thompson Jan. 1986 J. Shaneson       Lucilia Borsari Oct. 1985 P. Landweber     Paulo Cordaro Oct. 1985 F. Treves     Kent Orr Oct. 1985 J. Shaneson     Yuh-Dong Tsai Oct. 1985 T. Petrie     H. Leroy Hutson May 1985 W. Vasconcelos     Gary Martin May 1985 G. Cherlin     John C.M. Nash May 1985 M. Nathanson     Arundhati Raychaudhuri May 1985 F. Roberts       Yungchen Cheng Oct. 1984 E. Taft     Richard J. Pfister Oct. 1984 J. Lepowsky     Norman Adams May 1984 M. Tierney     Eung Chun Cho May 1984 T. Petrie     Terence Lindgren May 1984 M. Tierney     Robert Opsut May 1984 F. Roberts     Dong Youp Suh May 1984 T. Petrie       Joan Farmer Amgott Oct. 1983 J. Lebowitz     Steven Chapin Oct. 1983 R. Nussbaum     Guillermo Ferreyra Oct. 1983 H. Sussmann     Robert S. Maier Oct. 1983 J. Lebowitz     David Mitzman Oct. 1983 J. Lepowsky     Steven Amgott May 1983 B. Mitchell     Kil Hyun Kwon May 1983 F. Treves     Jiang Jin Sheng May 1983 R. Falk     Carol Ann Keller Jan. 1983 M. Tierney     Peter Monk Jan. 1983 R. Falk     Alan Siegel Jan. 1983 T. Petrie       Zsu(zsanna) Kadas Oct. 1982 H. Othmer     Kailash C. Misra Oct. 1982 R. Wilson     Stephen Breen June 1982 J. Lebowitz     Jorge Gerszonowicz June 1982 F. Treves     Paul Schachter June 1982 J. Shaneson     Joanne Darken Jan. 1982 H. Sussmann     Martin Farber Jan. 1982 P. Hell       Ernst Adams Oct. 1981 B. Muckenhoupt     Dohan Kim Oct. 1981 F. Treves     Margaret Barry-Cozzens June 1981 F. Roberts   David Hecker June 1981 W. Sweeney   Arne Meurman June 1981 J. Lepowsky       Shirlei Serconek Oct. 1980 R. Wilson     Susan Szczepanski Oct. 1980 J. Shaneson     Michael Weiss June 1980 G. Cherlin   Cheng-Shung Ko Jan. 1980 P. Hell     Ira L. Robbin Jan. 1980 E. Speer     Bernadette Tutinas Jan. 1980 D. Gorenstein  1970-1979: 107 Ph.D.'s TOP   Stephen Andrilli Oct. 1979 C. Sims     Edward Deloff Oct. 1979 J. D'Atri     Stephen Davis Oct. 1979 R. Lyons     Regina Mladineo Oct. 1979 N. Levitt     Richard Watnick Oct. 1979 J. Rosenstein     Joseph McDonough June 1979 J. Cronin-Scanlon       Max Ashkenazi Oct. 1978 J. Cronin-Scanlon     Nancy H. Baxter Oct. 1978 R. Nussbaum     Nan-hung Chen Oct. 1978 B. Osofsky     Karl Heinz Dovermann Oct. 1978 T. Petrie     Stephen Hoyle Oct. 1978 J. Cronin-Scanlon     Mark Hunacek Oct. 1978 R. Wilson     Rochelle Leibowitz Oct. 1978 F. Roberts     Claude Pichet Oct. 1978 N. Wallach     Theodore Wilson Oct. 1978 J. Shaneson     Vernon Eagle Jr. June 1978 A. Kosinski     Douglas Kurtz June 1978 R. Wheeden     Susan Niefield June 1978 B. Mitchell     Alvany Rocha Jan. 1978 N. Wallach       William Heck Oct. 1977 E. Ellentuck     Justine Skalba Oct. 1977 C. Sims     Richard Stafford Oct. 1977 M. O'Nan     Leh-Sheng Tang Oct. 1977 H. Sussmann     Adalberto Bergamasco June 1977 J. Barros-Neto     Ronald Dotzel June 1977 G. Bredon     Sarah Glaz June 1977 W. Vasconcelos     Charles Schwartz June 1977 W. Hoyt     Maria Welleda Silva June 1977 N. Wallach     Valdis Vijums June 1977 J. Shaneson     Roman W-C Wong June 1977 B. Mitchell     Edward Conjura Jan. 1977 W. Petryshyn     Anna Silverstein Jan. 1977 J.C.E. Dekker       Edgar Becerra-Bertram Oct. 1976 J. Shaneson     Oscar Campoli Oct. 1976 N. Wallach     Janey Daccach Oct. 1976 P. Landweber     Linda Anne Grieco Oct. 1976 C. Sims     Shyn-Ling Lee Oct. 1976 S. Leader     Walter Mallory Oct. 1976 E. Ellentuck     Isabel Miatello Oct. 1976 G. Bredon     Roberto Miatello Oct. 1976 N. Wallach     Sandra Brook June 1976 S. Leader     Letitia Seese(Korbley) June 1976 F. Treves     James Carrig Jan. 1976 W. Vasconcelos     Andrew Chermak Jan. 1976 D. Gorenstein     Stephen Fellner Jan. 1976 J. Rosenstein     Ricardo Morais Jan. 1976 E. Ellentuck       Luis Frota-Mattos Oct. 1975 R. Goodman     Leslie Jones   1975 P. Landweber     Gerard Kiernan Oct. 1975 D. Gorenstein     Hsiao-wei Kuo Oct. 1975 B. Muckenhoupt     Edward Lotkowski Oct. 1975 R. Wheeden     Simon Aloff June 1975 J. Shaneson     Ítalo Déjter June 1975 T. Petrie     Gary Gundersen June 1975 R. Goodman     Russell John June 1975 R. Wheeden     Thomas Marlowe June 1975 E. Taft     Petronije Milojevic June 1975 W. Petryshyn     Jay Shapiro June 1975 B. Osofsky     Ira J. Papick Jan. 1975 D. Dobbs       Jui-Chi Chang Oct. 1974 D. Gorenstein     Ching-an C. Cheng Oct. 1974 B. Mitchell     Jeffrey Dawson Oct. 1974 W. Vasconcelos     Edward Dougherty Oct. 1974 J. Elliott     Kenneth Klinger Oct. 1974 D. Gorenstein     Edward Boyno June 1974 G. Bredon     Roosevelt Gentry June 1974 V. Williams     Roy Goldman June 1974 F. Treves     Jorge Hounie June 1974 F. Treves     Roger Jones June 1974 R. Gundy     Alan Meyerhoff June 1974 T. Petrie     Noriko Yui June 1974 R. Bumby     David Kopcso Jan. 1974 R. Wilson       Antonio Gilioli Oct. 1973 F. Treves     Brian Greenberg Oct. 1973 W. Vasconcelos     Richard Guhl Oct. 1973 J.C.E. Dekker     Saroj Jain Oct. 1973 C. Faith     Marian Kelterborn Oct. 1973 S. Leader     Ana Viola Prioli Oct. 1973 W. Vasconcelos     Jorge Viola Prioli Oct. 1973 B. Osofsky     Barry J. Arnow June 1973 S. Leader     Wolf Iberkleid June 1973 P. Landweber     Northrup Fowler June 1973 J.C.E. Dekker     Eugene Gaydos June 1973 S. Leader     Sarah J. Gottlieb June 1973 E. Taft     Hu Sheng June 1973 W. Vasconcelos     Rudolf Rucker Jan. 1973 E. Ellentuck       Carl Bredlau Oct. 1972 E. Ellentuck     Robert C. Miller Oct. 1972 D. Gorenstein     Cristián Sánchez June 1972 G. Bredon     David Slater Oct. 1972 J. Rosenstein       Ann K. Boyle Oct. 1971 C. Faith     Ted Williamson Oct. 1971 W. Petryshyn     Reginald Luke Oct. 1971 W. Mason     Louie Mahony Oct. 1971 A. Kosinski     Ranga Rao Oct. 1971 C. Faith     Ralph Artino June 1971 J. Barros-Neto     Michael Fitzpatrick June 1971 W. Petryshyn     Eileen Poiani June 1971 B. Muckenhoupt     Ira Wolf June 1971 M. Tierney       John Empoliti Oct. 1970 C. Sims     James Roberts Oct. 1970 S. Leader     David Addis Jun 1970 L. McAuley   Peter Evanovich Jun 1970 R. Cohn   Jeffrey Levine Jun 1970 B. Osofsky   Roger Pitasky Jun 1970 S. Leader   Philip Zipse Jun 1970 S. Leader   Douglas McCarthy Jan. 1970 J. Cronin-Scanlon    1961-1969: 39 Ph.D.'s TOP   Victor Camillo Oct. 1969 C. Faith     John Cozzens Oct. 1969 C. Faith     Charles Applebaum June 1969 J.C.E. Dekker     Francis Christoph June 1969 L. McAuley     Clifton Lando June 1969 J. Cronin-Scanlon     John McDonald June 1969 J. Elliott     William Quirin June 1969 C. Sims     David Wilson June 1969 L. McAuley     Barbara A. Lando Jan. 1969 R. Cohn       Harry Berkowitz Oct. 1968 P. Roy     Peter Fowler Oct. 1968 J. Elliott     Charles Hallahan Oct. 1968 E. Taft     Richard Munson Oct. 1968 W. Hoyt     Floyd B. Cole June 1968 J.C.E. Dekker     Richard Bauer Jan. 1968 R. Artzy       Robert Fraser Oct. 1967 S. Leader     Frode Terkelson Oct. 1967 J. Elliott       Herbert I. Brown   1966 V. Cowling     William H. Caldwell   1966 C. Faith     Matthew Hassett   1966 J.C.E. Dekker     Gerald S. Ungar   1966 L.F. McAuley     Avraham Ornstein Oct. 1966 C. Faith       Irving Bentsen   1965 R. Cohn     V. Mancuso Oct. 1965 B. Candless       Joseph Barback Oct. 1964 J.C.E. Dekker     William R. Jones   1964 H. Zimmerberg     William E. Kirwan   1964 M. Robertson     Barbara Langer Osofsky   1964 C. Faith     Fred J. Sansone   1964 J.C.E. Dekker     Chung-Lie Wang   1964 R. Carroll     Angelo Pelios Jan. 1964 S. Leader     Donald Ferguson Oct. 1963 J.C.E. Dekker     Eric S. Langford   1963 S. Leader     Albert E. Livingston   1963 M. Robertson     Israel Zuckerman   1963 R. Cohn     Leonard Gewirtzman Oct. 1962 K. Wolfson     Michael Lodato Oct. 1962 S. Leader     Charles Franke May 1962 R. Cohn     Richard J. Libera May 1962 M. Robertson   1951-1960: 7 Ph.D.'s TOP   Ronald McHaffey   1960 K. Wolfson     Aaron Siegel   1960 V. Shapiro     John Bender   1958 M. Robertson     Bernard Greenspan   1958 R. Cohn     Richard Gabriel   1955 M. Robertson     Richard K. Brown   1952 M. Robertson     George Y. Cherlin   1951 M. Robertson     Number of doctorates by year: !---->         2019       2009   12   1999   11   1989   7   1979   6   1969   9   2018    10   2008   11   1998   11   1988   8   1978   13   1968   6   2017    14   2007   6   1997   15   1987   7   1977   13   1967   2   2016    15   2006   9   1996   16   1986   9   1976   15   1966   5   2015   16   2005   12   1995   19   1985   8   1975   13   1965   2   2014   16   2004   15   1994   17   1984   7   1974   13   1964   7   2013   12   2003   10   1993   10   1983   11   1973   15   1963   4   2012   11   2002   3   1992   12   1982   7   1972   4   1962   4   2011   7   2001   10   1991   15   1981   5   1971   9   1961   0   2010   12   2000   6   1990   12   1980   6   1970   8   1960   2   Return to the top. Data before 1984 compiled by M. Jablonski. Data 1984-2005 compiled by C. Weibel.    

01:640:350:H - Linear Algebra Honors Section

Prof. Weibel (640:350:H1) — Fall 2017 This course is a proof-based continuation of Math 250, covering Abstract vector spaces and linear transformations, inner product spaces, diagonalization, and canonical forms.  Prerequisites:  CALC4, Math 250 and Math 300 Text: Linear Algebra (4th ed.), by Friedberg, Insel and Spence,Prentice Hall, 2003   ISBN 0-13-008451-4. Lectures MW6 (5:00-6:20PM) in ARC 333 Weibel's Office hours: Monday 1:30-2:45 PM; Wednesday 10:30AM-12 noon Tentative Course Syllabus WeekLecture dates Sections   topics 1 9/6 (W)  Chapter 1 Abstract vector spaces & subspaces 2 9/11 (M), 13 (W) Chapter 1 Span of subsets, linear independence 3 9/18, 20 Chapter 1 Bases and dimension 4 9/25, 27 Chapter 2 Linear transformations 5 10/2, 10/4 Chapter 2 Change of basis, dual spaces 6 10/9, 10/11 Ch. 1-2  Review and Exam 1 7 10/16, 10/18 Chapter 3  Rank and Systems of Linear Equations 8 10/23, 10/25 Chapter 4  Determinants and their properties 9 10/30, 11/1 Chapter 5  Eigenvalues/eigenvectors 10 11/6, 11/8 Chapter 5  Cayley-Hamilton 11 11/13, 11/15 Chapter 7  Jordan Canonical Form 12 11/20 Chapter 7  Rational Canonical Form 13 11/27, 11/29  Ch.3,4,5,7  Review and Exam 2 14 12/4, 12/6 Chapter 6  Inner Product spaces 15 12/11, 12/13 Chapter 6  Unitary and Orthogonal operators (last class) 17 December 21 (Thursday) 4-7 PM Final Exam Homework Assignments td>6.3 #17,22(c); 6.5 #6,7 HW Due on:HW Problems (due Wednesdays)  Sept. 13 1.2 #17; 1.3 #19,23; 1.4 #11,13; 1.5 #9,15 Sept. 20 1.6 #20,26,29; 1.7 #5,6; 2.1 #3,11,28 Show that P(X) is a vector space over F2, and find a basis Sept. 27 2.2 #6; 2.3 #12; 2.4 #15,21; 2.5 #3(d),8,13 Oct. 4 2.6#10; 2.7#11,14; 3.1#6,12; 3.2#9; 3.3#10 Show that F[t]* is iso. to F[[x]] Oct. 25 4.1 #11; 4.2 #24, 29; 4.3 #10,12,21 Nov. 1 5.1 #3b, 20, 33a; 5.2 #4, 9a, 12 Nov. 8 5.3 #6; 5.4 #13,17,21,27,36 Nov. 15 7.1 #3b,9b,11; 7.2 #3,14,19a; 7.3 #13,14 Find all 4x4 Jordan canonical forms satisfying T2=T3 Dec. 13 6.1 #11,27(b,c),28; 6.2 #6,10; 6.3 #17,22(c); 6.5 #6,7     Main 350 course page Return to Weibel's Home Page   Schedule of Sections:

Proficiency Exams

Undergraduate Proficiency Examinations The Mathematics Department offers proficiency examinations for selected courses. Depending on the course, and their performance on the exam, students may earn one of two types of proficiency pass: Full-Credit proficiency. A student earning full-credit proficiency for a course gets credit for the course as though he/she took and passed the course. The course will appear on the students university transcript with a designation such as to "By examination". The student will also receive any credits towards graduation that are normally provided for passing the course. Mathematics Department internal proficiency. A student earning internal proficiency for a course (referred to below as course X) is considered to have passed the course for the following purposes: If course X is a requirement for the math major or math minor, then that requirement is considered to have been satisfied. If course X is a prerequisite for another math department course (referred to below as course Y) then that prerequisite is considered to be satisfied. To register for course Y, a student who has proficiency credit for X (and has satisfied all other prerequisites for course Y) will be given a prerequisite override from the undergraduate office. (In the case that the course Y is offered by another department, the student will need a prerequisite override from the department offering course Y. A student who has received internal proficiency for course X, may request that the math advisor contact the offering department informing the department offering course Y that the student has passed a proficiency exam for course X. The offering department has the final decision whether they will accept that as satisfying the prerequisite for course Y.) Course X will not appear on the student's transcript and will not earn credits toward graduation. Full-credit proficiency exams Full-credit proficiency exams are offered for courses 115,135, 151 and 152. To take an official proficiency exam the student should contact the office of the academic dean of their school to get prior approval, and to find out the rules for getting proficiency credit. This normally involves paying a fee to the registrar prior to taking the exam. Once this approval is obtained and the fee is paid, the student should bring the receipt from the registrar to the Math undergraduate office (Hill 303) to arrange a time to take the exam. Students receiving at least a grade of B on the proficiency exam will receive full credit for the course. It will appear on the transcript as ``by examination''. A student getting a C on the proficiency exam will not receive full credit for the course, but will be granted Mathematics Department internal proficiency as described above. Mathematics Department internal proficiency exams The department offers internal proficiency exam for courses 025 and 026, and also for course 250. Internal proficiency exams are occasionally offered for other courses in unusual situations. To take the internal proficiency exam for 025 or 026, contact the math undergraduate office () The internal proficiency exam for 250 is offered to students who have completed the honors calculus course 291, or to other students with the approval of the math advisor or the honors committee chair (who will notify the undergraduate office of the approval). Once this approval is obtained, the student should schedule the exam through the math undergraduate office. The proficiency test for 250 may be waived for students with a grade of A in Math 291. Evaluation of internal proficiency exams Course 025. A student receiving a grade of at least C will be allowed to register for 026. Course 026. A student receiving a grade of C will be allowed to register for 111 (Precalculus I). A student receiving a grade of B or higher will be allowed to register for 115 (Precalculus) Course 250. Proficiency credit for 250 requires a grade of at least B on the exam. Restrictions A student must have the required prerequisites for the course in which the proficiency exam is to be taken. A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course in which a student has previously enrolled and received a grade. A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course for which a student is currently registered (at Rutgers New Brunswick) and for which classes have started. A student may take a proficiency exam in a given course only once.  Dates Proficiency exams are offered at fixed times each week throughout the year (except near the beginning or end of a semester). A student may arrange to take the exam by contacting the Mathematics Undergraduate office, The student should allow one to two weeks for scheduling the exam.

Proficiency Exams

Undergraduate Proficiency Examinations The Mathematics Department offers proficiency examinations for selected courses. Depending on the course, and their performance on the exam, students may earn one of two types of proficiency pass: Full-Credit proficiency. A student earning full-credit proficiency for a course can get credit for the course as though he/she took and passed the course. The course will appear on the students university transcript with a designation such as to "By examination". The student will also receive any credits towards graduation that are normally provided for passing the course. Mathematics Department internal proficiency. A student earning internal proficiency for a course (referred to below as course X) is considered to have passed the course for the following purposes: If course X is a requirement for the math major or math minor, then that requirement is considered to have been satisfied. If course X is a prerequisite for another math department course (referred to below as course Y) then that prerequisite is considered to be satisfied. To register for course Y, a student who has proficiency credit for X (and has satisfied all other prerequisites for course Y) will be given a prerequisite override from the undergraduate office. (In the case that the course Y is offered by another department, the student will need a prerequisite override from the department offering course Y. A student who has received internal proficiency for course X, may request that the math advisor contact the offering department informing the department offering course Y that the student has passed a proficiency exam for course X. The offering department has the final decision whether they will accept that as satisfying the prerequisite for course Y.) Course X will not appear on the student's transcript and will not earn credits toward graduation. Full-credit proficiency exams Full-credit proficiency exams are offered for courses 135, 151 and 152.  Students receiving at least a grade of B on the proficiency exam can receive full credit for the course if they wish. The course will appear on the transcript as passed ``by examination''. A student getting a C on the proficiency exam will not receive full credit for the course, but will be granted Mathematics Department internal proficiency as described above. A student getting a D on the proficiency exam does not receive any type of credit and has to take the course. Mathematics Department internal proficiency exams The department offers internal proficiency exam for course 250. Internal proficiency exams are occasionally offered for other courses in unusual situations. The internal proficiency exam for 250 is offered to students who have completed the honors calculus course 291, or to other students with the approval of the math advisor or the honors committee chair (who will notify the undergraduate office of the approval). Once this approval is obtained, the student should schedule the exam through the math undergraduate office. The proficiency test for 250 may be waived for students with a grade of A in Math 291. Proficiency credit for 250 requires a grade of at least B on the exam. Restrictions A student must have the required prerequisites for the course in which the proficiency exam is to be taken. A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course in which a student has previously enrolled and received a grade. Additionally, a student who has was previously enrolled in Math 123 cannot take a proficiency exam in either of the Calculus I courses Math 135 or Math 151. A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course for which a student is currently registered (at Rutgers New Brunswick) and for which classes have started. A student may take a proficiency exam in a given course only once. Dates Proficiency exams are offered at fixed times throughout the year (except near the beginning or end of a semester). A student may arrange to take the exam by contacting the Mathematics Undergraduate office, The student should allow one to two weeks for scheduling the exam. The Math Placement Exam Incoming freshmen can demonstrate proficiency in courses 025, 026, and 115 by taking the math placement exam. After completing at least 8 hours of provided review activities, students can also take the placement exam a second time. The higher of the two scores is used to determine placement. In the past, the math department offered proficiency exams in courses 025, 026, and 115. These proficiency exams are no longer available, as students can now take the placement exam twice. There is no third attempt or any other way to circumvent the results of the placement exam. The placement exam may also be appropriate for certain transfer students and continuing students who have not taken any of the courses 025, 026, 111, 112, or 115 at Rutgers yet. Please contact the Math Advisor for advice about this. For technical assistance with the placement exam, please contact the Office of Testing and Placement.

01:640:152 - TEST PAGE FALL 2017

Math 151–152 is the introductory year course in the calculus sequence in New Brunswick for majors in the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and engineering. The first semester, Math 151 or 153, presents the differential calculus of the elementary functions of a single real variable: the rational, trigonometric and exponential functions and their inverses; various applications via the Mean Value Theorem; and an introduction to the integral calculus. The second semester, Math 152, continues the study of the integral calculus, with applications, and covers the theory of infinite series and power series, touching on differential equations and a few other topics as well. Transitioning from Math 135 to Math 152: Students who intend to go directly from Math 135 to Math 152 will need to fill in some gaps through self-study. The details are in the document: Transferring From 135 to 152 Textbook: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams, Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition, plus WebAssign Purchase options: Hardcover custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition). ISBN 978-1-319-04853-2 NJ Books: \(125.00. E-book custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition) ISBN 978-1-319-04911-9 NJ Books: \)107.50 The 3rd edition is purchased with a WebAssign access code which will be used throughout the sequence 151-152-251. The publisher is unable to replace this code if it is lost, so be careful to retain it.(The third edition was introduced beginning in Fall 2015.) Course Materials 152: Syllabus and Homework 152: Announcements and Review Sheets General Course Information for Math 151-152 (Spring 2017) Going from math 135 to math 152

01:640:152 - TEST PAGE FALL 2016

Math 151–152 is the introductory year course in the calculus sequence in New Brunswick for majors in the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and engineering. The first semester, Math 151 or 153, presents the differential calculus of the elementary functions of a single real variable: the rational, trigonometric and exponential functions and their inverses; various applications via the Mean Value Theorem; and an introduction to the integral calculus. The second semester, Math 152, continues the study of the integral calculus, with applications, and covers the theory of infinite series and power series, touching on differential equations and a few other topics as well. Transitioning from Math 135 to Math 152: Students who intend to go directly from Math 135 to Math 152 will need to fill in some gaps through self-study. The details are in the document: Transferring From 135 to 152 Textbook: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams, Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition, plus WebAssign Purchase options: Hardcover custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition). ISBN 978-1-319-04853-2 NJ Books: \(125.00. E-book custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition) ISBN 978-1-319-04911-9 NJ Books: \)107.50 The 3rd edition is purchased with a WebAssign access code which will be used throughout the sequence 151-152-251. The publisher is unable to replace this code if it is lost, so be careful to retain it.(The third edition was introduced beginning in Fall 2015.) Course Materials 152: Syllabus and Homework 152: Announcements and Review Sheets General Course Information for Math 151-152 (Spring 2017) Going from math 135 to math 152

test all courses fall CURRENT - MODULE

test all courses fall 2016

Joomla Tips

Joomla/HTML Tips & Tricks Page        This page is contains instructions to help faculty members with updating the Mathematics site. HOWTO-add-document.txt HOWTO-update-course-information-file-link-in-Joomla.txt Accessing Webassign through Sakai WebAssign - Guide for Instructors/Coordinators

Resources on Diversity and Inclusion

The Mathematics Department is committed to creating an environment in which every student, faculty, and staff member can thrive professionally.   In particular, the Department has a zero-tolerance policy for harassment (including either Title IX violations and violations of the codes of conduct for students and faculty.).  There are several committees and/or organizations at Rutgers to which community members can bring concerns. The joint Graduate Student-Faculty Climate Committee (membership below). deals with concerns about professional environment in the graduate program, and fosters dialogue between graduate students and faculty aimed at ensuring that every member of the community can realize their professional potential while at Rutgers.  Appointment to the committee for interested volunteers is at the discretion of the Chair; please contact the chair if you are willing to serve. The Diversity and Inclusion Faculty Committee (see below for membership) is charged with providing suggestions and resources that will help the department become a more welcoming and nurturing environment for faculty and students from all backgrounds, including those from under-represented groups, and improve recruiting and mentoring of faculty and students; and advising the undergraduate and graduate directors to help instructors conduct their classroom in more inclusive way. 1.  Procedure for concerns.    Members of the Rutgers mathematics community who have concerns or suggestions are encouraged to speak to a member of the Diversity & Inclusion Committee, the Climate Committee, the Graduate or Undergraduate Vice-Chairs, or the Department Chair, or the University resources listed below as appropriate.  Note that if the concern involves prohibited conduct, such as sexual harrassment, discrimination on the basis of a protected category, or creation of a hostile working environment, then most department staff will be obligated to report the concern to the university's Title IX office, who will then determine whether the reported conduct might represent Title IX harassment, harassment in violation of the student or faculty codes of conduct, or otherwise. In these cases persons with concerns may or may not wish to speak first to an advisor who is entitled to keep the concern confidential, available at https://nbtitleix.rutgers.edu/resources/faqs-student-complainants-and-respondents. The investigation of any harassment concern (depending on the roles of the individuals involved) may be handled either by the Office of Student Affairs Compliance & Title IX or by the Office of Employment Equity.      Which office concerns should be reported to depends on whether the accused individual is a student, employee, or third party (e.g., contractors, vendors, interns, volunteers), and whether the conduct occurred within the scope of their employment. Generally, the Office of Employment Equity (OEE) handles complaints against faculty, staff, and third parties, including salaried student employees, such as teaching and graduate assistants, where the conduct occurred within the scope of their employment.   The scope of the Office of Employment Equity’s services include complaints arising under the University’s  Discrimination and Harassment, Workplace Violence, Sexual Misconduct Under Title IX and Conscientious Employee Protection policies.  For more information about the  Office of Employment Equity, including information about their policies, the process for submitting a complaint, and resources, please visit their website.   The Office of Student Affairs Compliance & Title IX handles complaints against students on the New Brunswick Campus, generally including graduate and post-doctoral fellows.   If you have questions regarding where to report your concerns, you may contact the Office of Employment Equity at 848-932-3973, or email .  For more information about the Title IX Office, including information about their policies, the process for submitting a report, and resources, please visit their website. 2.  Resources for pregnancy and parental leave for TAs/GAs and full-time faculty.  Under the current contracts (2020) Rutgers offers paid leave of up to eight weeks for a parent to have parental leave after the child is born or when a child is adopted, regardless of gender, marital status/domestic partnership, or sexual orientation. Additionally, the birth mother receives six to eight weeks of paid recuperative leave.   Leave Programs 3. Resources on bias in letters of recommendation: Recommendation letters reflect gender bias Gender and letters of recommendation for academia: agentic and communal differences  4. Resources on bias in hiring   How To Minimize Unconscious Bias During Recruitment 7 Practical Ways to Reduce Bias in Your Hiring Process Committees with implicit biases promote fewer women when they do not believe gender bias exists Is Gender Bias Really Impacting The Hiring Of Women In STEM https://diversity.ucsf.edu/resources/strategies-address-unconscious-bias 6 Ways to Eliminate Gender Bias in the Workplace Description and Prescription: How Gender Stereotypes Prevent Women’s Ascent Up the Organizational Ladder. Regarding necessity for specific hiring criteria. https://bit.ly/2Y1fh98 No Credit Where Credit Is Due: Attributional Rationalization of Women’s Success in Male–Female Teams Tutorials for Change; Gender Schemas and Science Careers  5.  Other resources: LGBTQIA Resources Social Justice Center at Rutgers : http://socialjustice.rutgers.edu/resources/ Trans and Nonbinary specific resources: http://socialjustice.rutgers.edu/trans-ru/ Menu of workshops by-request: http://socialjustice.rutgers.edu/safer-space-training-program/request-a-training-workshop-or-presentation/ DICE Divisional Resources LinkedIn Learning Courses: https://diversity.rutgers.edu/LinkedIn_Learning Faculty Diversity Collaborative: https://diversity.rutgers.edu/fdc-explore Standing workshops from the Tyler Clementi Center for Diversity Education & Bias Prevention: https://nbdiversity.rutgers.edu/educational-workshops Interpersonal Violence Resources Rutgers CARES workshop from VPVA: http://vpva.rutgers.edu/rucares/ VPVA Menu ("Need Help?") http://vpva.rutgers.edu/i-am-facultystaff/i-am-concerned-about-a-student/ New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault: https://njcasa.org/our-work/ RAINN National support organization https://www.rainn.org/articles/sexual-harassment Rutgers page on sexual harassment: https://sexualharassment.rutgers.edu/about-us/action-collaborative-preventing-sexual-harassment-higher-education 6.  Committee on Diversity and Inclusion    Christopher Woodward, Chair <>;Fioralba Cakoni <>; Paul Feehan <>;Stephen Miller <>;Dima Sinapova <>Sheila Tabanli <> 7.  Joint Graduate Student-Faculty Committee on Department Climate    The Mathematics Climate committee focuses on improving the professional interaction in the department and removing obstacles for graduate students and faculty members from all backgrounds to thrive in the Department.  The current committee membership includes Lucy Martinez, Sriram Raghunath, Brittany Gelb, Dima Sinapova, Paul Feehan, and Chris Woodward (chair) Fri 9/22/2023 7:24 AM

Test Page iframe

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JExtBOX test

Abstract:  The Bianchi-Egnell Stability Estimate is a stability estimate or quantitative version of the Sobolev Inequality – it states that the difference of terms in the Sobolev Inequality controls the distance of a given function from the manifold of extremals of the Sobolev Inequality with distance measured in the gradient square or \[\dot^1\]norm. In this talk, we present an extension of the Bianchi-Egnell Stability Estimate to Bakry, Gentil, and Ledoux’s Generalization of the Sobolev Inequality to Continuous Dimensions. We also demonstrate a deep link between the Sobolev Inequality and a one-parameter family of sharp Gagliardo-Nirenberg (GN) inequalities and how this link can be used to derive a new stability estimate on the one-parameter family of sharp GN inequalities from our stability estimate on Bakry, Gentil, and Ledoux’s Generalization of the Sobolev Inequality to Continuous Dimensions. Here's a \[\frac+\frac=1\]test equation.

Homework - Fall 2018 - Draft

Here is the official list of homework problems from the 7th edition of the Kendall Hunt text. THE FINAL EXAM WILL ASSUME FAMILIARITY WITH THE MATERIAL COVERED BY THESE PROBLEMS.  THESE HOMEWORK PROBLEMS CONSTITUTE YOUR MAIN STUDY GUIDE FOR MATH 135. The exercises are listed by section of the book.  See the Lecture Topics page to determine which sections go with which lectures. The answers (not solutions) to the odd-numbered problems in this list are in the back of the textbook.  Here is a link to the answers (prepared by Prof. Melissa Lieberman) to the even-numbered problems starting with Chapter 2 in this list.  But be sure to work on the problems yourself before you check your work by looking up the answers. SECTIONPROBLEMS 1.2 2, 3, 5, 11, 15, 17, 19, 24, 28, 29, 33, 36. 1.3 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 17, 20, 27, 29, 40. 1.4 5, 9, 10, 11, 14, 17, 20, 24, 25b, 27, 28, 32, 33, 37, 38, 48. 2.1 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 13, 15, 29. 2.2 4, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, 23, 25, 37, 38, 39, 41, 43, 49, 52, 55. 2.3 15, 21, 25, 27, 29, 30, 37, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45. 2.4 1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 19, 22, 27, 29, 32, 35, 36, 44, 47, 49. 3.1 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 17, 19, 22, 23, 24, 26, 32, 33, 38, 41, 42, 43. 3.2 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 16, 18, 21, 24, 25, 27, 29, 33, 36, 41. 3.3 1, 3, 4, 6, 11, 15, 17, 18, 20, 29, 37, 39, 41, 45, 52. 3.4 3, 5, 7, 12, 13, 16, 19, 22, 34, 35. 3.5 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 34, 38, 42, 46. 3.6 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 14, 26, 27, 31, 35, 36, 38, 43, 45. 3.7 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, 21, 26, 28, 29, 30, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 46. 3.8 3, 4, 8, 13, 19, 20, 23, 25, 28, 40, 42, 44, 45. 4.1 4, 5, 11, 12, 17, 25, 27, 32, 36, 50. 4.2 7, 10, 21, 22, 27, 30. 4.3 5, 6, 11, 25, 34, 36, 40, 42, 45. 4.4 10, 11, 12, 15, 20, 23, 27, 29, 33, 38, 47, 48. 4.5 1, 3, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 17, 21, 23, 30, 37, 38, 39.  Also: problems #17, 19 and 27 from Section 4.3. 4.6 7, 8, 16, 27, 28, 34, 35, 39. 4.7 1, 6, 13, 14, 15, 18, 25, 26. 5.1 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 17, 21, 23, 26, 40, 41, 43, 44. 5.2 3, 4, 8, 25, 28. 5.3 3, 4, 5, 6. 5.4 2, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 23, 29, 32, 33, 35, 37, 40, 51, 52. 5.5 1, 3, 6, 9, 10, 13, 15, 16, 21, 27, 30, 33, 40, 41, 44.

Courses - Calculus I - Fall 2018 - draft

Courses 01:640:135 - Calculus I Textbook:  For current textbook please refer to our Master Textbook List page Math 135 provides an introduction to calculus. It is taken primarily by students interested in the biological sciences, business, economics, and pharmacy. Math 135 may be followed by Math 136. There is another calculus sequence, Math 151-152-251, which is taken by students in the mathematical and physical sciences, engineering, and computer science. Although it is possible to take Math 152 after Math 135, this is not a recommended sequence. More importantly, the prerequisite for Math 251 is Math 152; Math 136 does not satifsy this prerequisite. Students who may need to take Math 152 or 251 should start their study of calculus with Math 151, and students who decide after taking Math 135 that they may wish to take Math 251 should follow Math 135 with Math 152. In addition to the standard 4-credit format of the course, a a 5-credit format has been used for some of the sections, but only the 4-credit format is now being offered. Course Materials Spring 2018 Previous Semesters Fall 2017 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2013 Spring 2013 Fall 2012 Spring 2012 Fall 2011 Spring 2011 Fall 2010 Spring 2010 Fall 2009     Instructors' web pages Summer 2009 Spring 2009 Schedule of Sections 01:640:135 Schedule of Sections This option will not work correctly. Unfortunately, your browser does not support inline frames.

Michael Weingart's homepage

Michael Weingart Associate Teaching Professor of Mathematics weingart [at] math [dot] rutgers [dot] edu      Fall 2018 Teaching: Math 104:01 Introduction to Probability Math 104:03 Introduction to Probability

Homework - Fall 2018 - Draft with correct frame

Here is the official list of homework problems from the 7th edition of the Kendall Hunt text. THE FINAL EXAM WILL ASSUME FAMILIARITY WITH THE MATERIAL COVERED BY THESE PROBLEMS.  THESE HOMEWORK PROBLEMS CONSTITUTE YOUR MAIN STUDY GUIDE FOR MATH 135. The exercises are listed by section of the book.  See the Lecture Topics page to determine which sections go with which lectures. The answers (not solutions) to the odd-numbered problems in this list are in the back of the textbook.  Here is a link to the answers (prepared by Prof. Melissa Lieberman) to the even-numbered problems starting with Chapter 2 in this list.  But be sure to work on the problems yourself before you check your work by looking up the answers. SECTIONPROBLEMS 1.2 2, 3, 5, 11, 15, 17, 19, 24, 28, 29, 33, 36. 1.3 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 17, 20, 27, 29, 40. 1.4 5, 9, 10, 11, 14, 17, 20, 24, 25b, 27, 28, 32, 33, 37, 38, 48. 2.1 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 13, 15, 29. 2.2 4, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, 23, 25, 37, 38, 39, 41, 43, 49, 52, 55. 2.3 15, 21, 25, 27, 29, 30, 37, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45. 2.4 1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 19, 22, 27, 29, 32, 35, 36, 44, 47, 49. 3.1 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 17, 19, 22, 23, 24, 26, 32, 33, 38, 41, 42, 43. 3.2 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 16, 18, 21, 24, 25, 27, 29, 33, 36, 41. 3.3 1, 3, 4, 6, 11, 15, 17, 18, 20, 29, 37, 39, 41, 45, 52. 3.4 3, 5, 7, 12, 13, 16, 19, 22, 34, 35. 3.5 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 34, 38, 42, 46. 3.6 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 14, 26, 27, 31, 35, 36, 38, 43, 45. 3.7 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, 21, 26, 28, 29, 30, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 46. 3.8 3, 4, 8, 13, 19, 20, 23, 25, 28, 40, 42, 44, 45. 4.1 4, 5, 11, 12, 17, 25, 27, 32, 36, 50. 4.2 7, 10, 21, 22, 27, 30. 4.3 5, 6, 11, 25, 34, 36, 40, 42, 45. 4.4 10, 11, 12, 15, 20, 23, 27, 29, 33, 38, 47, 48. 4.5 1, 3, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 17, 21, 23, 30, 37, 38, 39.  Also: problems #17, 19 and 27 from Section 4.3. 4.6 7, 8, 16, 27, 28, 34, 35, 39. 4.7 1, 6, 13, 14, 15, 18, 25, 26. 5.1 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 17, 21, 23, 26, 40, 41, 43, 44. 5.2 3, 4, 8, 25, 28. 5.3 3, 4, 5, 6. 5.4 2, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 23, 29, 32, 33, 35, 37, 40, 51, 52. 5.5 1, 3, 6, 9, 10, 13, 15, 16, 21, 27, 30, 33, 40, 41, 44.

Math 350 Section 4 Fall 2018

01:640:350:04 Linear Algebra Section 04 11407 Woodward, Christopher Lecture TF2 1020 A - 1140 BE-250 LIV   This course is a proof-based continuation of Math 250, covering Abstract vector spaces and linear transformations, inner product spaces, diagonalization, and canonical forms.  Prerequisites:  CALC4, Math 250 and Math 300 Text: Linear Algebra (4th ed.), by Friedberg, Insel and Spence,Prentice Hall, 2003   ISBN 0-13-008451-4.   For this section 04, any recent edition of the textbook should be sufficient. Class TF2 1020 A - 1140 BE-250 LIV Office Hours:  Monday 2:15-3:15pm, Hill 726  Contact Information:  e-mail  The course is strongly based on Math 250. However, we'll work axiomatically, starting from the abstract notions of vector space and of linear transformation. Much of the homework and many of the exam and quiz problems will require you to write precise proofs, building on your proof-writing experience in Math 300. From this more abstract viewpoint, we'll be developing linear algebra far beyond Math 250, with new insight and new applications. Class attendance is very important. A lot of what we do in class will involve collective participation.  We will cover the topics indicated in the syllabus below, but the dates that we cover some of the topics might be adjusted during the semester, depending on class discussion, etc. Such adjustments, along with the almost-weekly homework assignments, will be announced in class and also posted on this webpage, so be sure to check this webpage regularly.  Absences from a single class due to minor illnesses should be self-reported using the university system; for longer absences, students should email me with the situation.   I reserve the right to lower the course grade up to one full letter grade for poor attendance.  Make-ups for exams are generally not given; if a student has an extremely good reason (e.g. documented medical emergency) I may re-arrange the grading scheme to accomodate.   Problem sets are due on most Tuesdays. There are no problems due on the two midterm-exam Tuesdays. Note that we will cover significant material from all the chapters in the book, Chapters 1-7.   Grading policy: First midterm exam: 100 points; Second midterm exam: 100 points; Problem sets and quizzes: 100 points; Final exam: 200 points (Total: 500 points).  Tentative Course Syllabus WeekLecture dates Sections   topics 1 9/4 (T)  Chapter 1 Abstract vector spaces & subspaces 2 9/7, 9/11  Chapter 1 Span of subsets, linear independence 3 9/14, 9/18 Chapter 1 Bases and dimension 4 9/21, 9/25 Chapter 2 Linear transformations 5 9/28, 10/2 Chapter 2 Change of basis, dual spaces 6 10/5, 10/9 Ch. 1-2  Review and Exam 1 (10/9) 7 10/12, 10/16 Chapter 3  Rank and Systems of Linear Equations 8 10/19, 10/23 Chapter 4  Determinants and their properties 9 10/26, 10/30 Chapter 5  Eigenvalues/eigenvectors 10 11/2, 11/6 Chapter 5  Diagonalization, Markov Chains 11 11/9, 11/13 Chapter 6  Inner Product spaces 12 11/16 Chapter 6  Unitary and Orthogonal operators 13 11/21, 11/27  Ch.3,4,5,7  Review and Exam 2 (11/27) 14 11/30, 12/4 Chapter 7  Orthogonal diagonalization 15 12/7, 12/11 Chapter 7  Jordan canonical form 17 12/21 (Fri) 8-11am Final Exam Location TBA   Main 350 course page  Exam Dates The exam dates are listed in the schedule above.  Any conflict (such as with a religious holiday) should be reported to me at the beginning of the semester, so that the exam may be re-scheduled.   Special Accommodations Students with disabilities requesting accommodations must follow the procedures outlined at https://ods.rutgers.edu/students/applying-for-services Academic Integrity All Rutgers students are expected to be familiar with and abide by the academic integrity policy. Violations of the policy are taken very seriously.  In particular, your work should be your own; you are responsible for properly crediting all help with the solution. Problem Sets The Problem Sets are available in the assignments directory on the course Sakai site.  Problem sets should be hand-written in reasonably clear writing, with an explanation of any assistance given.   Type-written assignments are allowable only by special arrangement (disability etc.)  Scans of problem sets may be submitted electronically in emergencies (illness or accident) by upload to Sakai.   Some basic writing guidelines are as follows.  Please write in complete sentences; avoid starting each sentence with a symbol; ensure that each variable or notation is defined; number sentences or formulas as necessary so that you may refer back to them.  To prove a "for all x", usually begin with "Let x be a ...".  To prove an "there exists x" statement, you must construct a particular x satisfying the given property, so "Define x to be ...".  To prove a that property A implies property B, begin  with "Assume Property A...." Then deduce Property B.    Sets are equal if they have the same elements; functions are equal if they have the same values; to prove something does not satisfy a list of axioms; it suffices to show that one of the axioms fails.   On both problem sets and exams you may use properties in the text or class (referring to them by page or date) if they come before the problem you are solving in the development of the material.  Problem Sets from 2017 Problems in pdf.  Solutions in pdf.)  Problems in pdf. Solutions in pdf.)  Problems in pdf. Solutions in pdf.) Problems in pdf.  Solutions in pdf.) Practice problems in pdf for the first midterm. Last year's exam with Answers.  Problems in pdf. Problem in pdf.   Selected Answers to PS5, PS6, PS7.  (Problems in pdf) Problems in pdf)  Problems in pdf. Last year's second midterm with answers.   Answers and practice problems for the final.  Last year's final and solutions. More review problems for the second midterm. Pratice problems for the second exam: (Problems in pdf) Recommended Practice Problems (the problem sets from 2016)    Sept. 13 1.2 #17; 1.3 #19,23; 1.4 #11,13; 1.5 #9,15 Sept. 20 1.6 # 20,21,26,29; 1.7 #5,6 Sept. 27 2.1 #3,11,28; 2.2 #4; 2.3 #12; 2.4 #15,17 October 4 2.5 #3(d),7(a,b),13; 2.6 #5,10; Show that F[x]* ≅ F[[x]]. October 18 3.1 #6,12; 3.2 #5(b,d,h),17; 3.3 #8,10; 3.4 #8,15 If an nxn matrix A has each row sum 0, some Ax=b has no solution. October 25 4.1 #10(a,c); 4.2 #23;  4.3 #12,22(c),25(c);  4.4 #6; 4.5 #11,12 Nov. 1 5.1 #3(b),20,21; 5.2 #4,9(a),12; Show that the cross productinduces an isomorphism between R³ and Λ²(R³). Nov. 8 5.2 #18(a),21;  5.3 #2(d,f);   5.4 #6(a),13,19,25 Nov. 15 7.1 #3(b),9(a),13; 7.2 #3,14,19(a); 7.3 #13,14; Find all 4x4 Jordan canonical forms of T satisfying T²=T³. Dec. 13 6.1; #6,11,12,17;   6.2 #2a,6,11;   6.8 #4(a,c,d),11

Math 350H Spring 2019

01:640:350:H Linear Algebra Section H1 12832 Woodward, Christopher Lecture MW4 0140P-0300 HLL-009 BUS                 This course is a proof-based continuation of Math 250, covering Abstract vector spaces and linear transformations, inner product spaces, diagonalization, and canonical forms.  Prerequisites:  CALC4, Math 250 and Math 300 Text: Linear Algebra (4th ed.), by Friedberg, Insel and Spence,Prentice Hall, 2003   ISBN 0-13-008451-4.   For this section, any recent edition of the textbook should be sufficient. Class         MW4 0140P-0300 HLL-009 BUS Office Hours:  Tues 2-3 pm, Hill 726  Contact Information:  e-mail  The course is strongly based on Math 250. However, we'll work axiomatically, starting from the abstract notions of vector space and of linear transformation. Much of the homework and many of the exam and quiz problems will require you to write precise proofs, building on your proof-writing experience in Math 300. From this more abstract viewpoint, we'll be developing linear algebra far beyond Math 250, with new insight and new applications. Class attendance is very important. A lot of what we do in class will involve collective participation.  We will cover the topics indicated in the syllabus below, but the dates that we cover some of the topics might be adjusted during the semester, depending on class discussion, etc. Such adjustments, along with the almost-weekly homework assignments, will be announced in class and also posted on this webpage, so be sure to check this webpage regularly.  Absences from a single class due to minor illnesses should be self-reported using the university system; for longer absences, students should email me with the situation.   I reserve the right to lower the course grade up to one full letter grade for poor attendance.  Make-ups for exams are generally not given; if a student has an extremely good reason (e.g. documented medical emergency) I may re-arrange the grading scheme to accomodate.   Problem sets are due on most Tuesdays. There are no problems due on the two midterm-exam Tuesdays. Note that we will cover significant material from all the chapters in the book, Chapters 1-7.   Grading policy: First midterm exam: 100 points; Second midterm exam: 100 points; Problem sets and quizzes: 100 points; Final exam: 200 points (Total: 500 points).  Tentative Course Syllabus WeekLecture dates Sections   topics 1 1/23 Chapter 1 Abstract vector spaces & subspaces 2 1/28,1/30  Chapter 1 Span of subsets, linear independence 3 2/4, 2/6 Chapter 1 Bases and dimension 4 2/11, 2/13 Chapter 2 Linear transformations 5 2/18, 2/20 Chapter 2 Change of basis, dual spaces 6 2/25, 2/27 Ch. 1-2  Review and Exam 1 (10/9) 7 3/4, 3/6 Chapter 3  Rank and Systems of Linear Equations 8 3/11, 3/13 Chapter 4  Determinants and their properties 9 3/25, 3/27 Chapter 5  Eigenvalues/eigenvectors 10 4/1, 4/3 Chapter 5  Diagonalization, Markov Chains 11 4/8, 4/10 Chapter 6  Inner Product spaces 12 4/15 Chapter 6  Unitary and Orthogonal operators 13 4/17, 4/22  Ch.3,4,5,6  Review and Exam 2 (4/22) 14 4/24, 4/29 Chapter 7  Orthogonal diagonalization 15 5/1, 5/6 Chapter 7  Jordan canonical form 17 5/14 (Tues) 12-3pm Final Exam HILL 009   Main 350 course page  Exam Dates The exam dates are listed in the schedule above.  Any conflict (such as with a religious holiday) should be reported to me at the beginning of the semester, so that the exam may be re-scheduled.   Special Accommodations Students with disabilities requesting accommodations must follow the procedures outlined at https://ods.rutgers.edu/students/applying-for-services Academic Integrity All Rutgers students are expected to be familiar with and abide by the academic integrity policy. Violations of the policy are taken very seriously.  In particular, your work should be your own; you are responsible for properly crediting all help with the solution. Problem Sets The Problem Sets are available in the assignments directory on the course Sakai site.  Problem sets should be hand-written in reasonably clear writing, with an explanation of any assistance given.   Type-written assignments are allowable only by special arrangement (disability etc.)  Scans of problem sets may be submitted electronically in emergencies (illness or accident) by upload to Sakai.   Some basic writing guidelines are as follows.   All answers must be written in complete sentences; avoid starting each sentence with a symbol; ensure that each variable or notation is defined; number sentences or formulas as necessary so that you may refer back to them.  To prove a "for all x", usually begin with "Let x be a ...".  To prove an "there exists x" statement, you must construct a particular x satisfying the given property, so "Define x to be ...".  To prove a that property A implies property B, begin  with "Assume Property A...." Then deduce Property B.    Sets are equal if they have the same elements; functions are equal if they have the same values; to prove something does not satisfy a list of axioms; it suffices to show that one of the axioms fails.   On both problem sets and exams you may use properties in the text or class (referring to them by page or date) if they come before the problem you are solving in the development of the material.  Problem Sets from 2017 Problems in pdf.  Solutions in pdf.)  Problems in pdf. Solutions in pdf.)  Problems in pdf. Solutions in pdf.) Problems in pdf.  Solutions in pdf.) Practice problems in pdf for the first midterm. Last year's exam with Answers.  Problems in pdf. Problem in pdf.   Selected Answers to PS5, PS6, PS7.  (Problems in pdf) Problems in pdf)  Problems in pdf. Last year's second midterm with answers.   Answers and practice problems for the final.  Last year's final and solutions. More review problems for the second midterm. Pratice problems for the second exam: (Problems in pdf) Recommended Practice Problems (the problem sets from 2016)    Sept. 13 1.2 #17; 1.3 #19,23; 1.4 #11,13; 1.5 #9,15 Sept. 20 1.6 # 20,21,26,29; 1.7 #5,6 Sept. 27 2.1 #3,11,28; 2.2 #4; 2.3 #12; 2.4 #15,17 October 4 2.5 #3(d),7(a,b),13; 2.6 #5,10; Show that F[x]* ≅ F[[x]]. October 18 3.1 #6,12; 3.2 #5(b,d,h),17; 3.3 #8,10; 3.4 #8,15 If an nxn matrix A has each row sum 0, some Ax=b has no solution. October 25 4.1 #10(a,c); 4.2 #23;  4.3 #12,22(c),25(c);  4.4 #6; 4.5 #11,12 Nov. 1 5.1 #3(b),20,21; 5.2 #4,9(a),12; Show that the cross productinduces an isomorphism between R³ and Λ²(R³). Nov. 8 5.2 #18(a),21;  5.3 #2(d,f);   5.4 #6(a),13,19,25 Nov. 15 7.1 #3(b),9(a),13; 7.2 #3,14,19(a); 7.3 #13,14; Find all 4x4 Jordan canonical forms of T satisfying T²=T³. Dec. 13 6.1; #6,11,12,17;   6.2 #2a,6,11;   6.8 #4(a,c,d),11

2019 D'Atri Lectures

poster

Grader Application -- Fall 2024

Information about the positions: Graders are typically given a few days to grade an assignment, so the working hours of graders are flexible. The pay is \$15.13-\$17 per hour for undergraduates (depending on the level), and for graduates is \$17.25-\$24 per hour; the work load is a total of 3-4 hours per week, on average, for one course during the fall. NOT all grading will be done online this fall. Before applying, please ask yourself if you will realistically have time to take on this commitment. It is extremely important that all deadlines the professors set for completing the grading are met. If you are interested in being considered for this position, please COMPLETE THE ENTIRE FORM below. Please note there is often considerable interest in these grading positions, so not every applicant could be hired. To be considered for a position, an applicant needs to have successfully completed the course at Rutgers (with an A grade), and have a GPA of at least 3.2. This Fall, we will be hiring graders for the following courses only: 103, 104, 106, 136, 152H(only)244, 250, 251, 252, 285, 291300, 311, 321, 325, 350, 351, 354, 356, 361, 373411, 421, 423, 428, 435, 437(old 436), 441, 451, 454, 477, 478, 481, 485, 486503, 527(double assignment), 550(double assignment) We will NOT hire graders for any other courses. Please do not request them.   The Fall 2024 application To apply for a grader position for any course in Fall 2024, please complete the Fall 2024 Grader application.   ============= * If you have any questions, please email Prof. Mavrea only at . ** Due to the large number of applications, only applicants who are selected will be contacted (via email).

RUMTC - Rutgers Math Teachers' Circle

  Mathematics Teachers' Circles consist of groups of mathematicians and K-12 teachers who meet regularly to discuss interesting mathematical problems. The Rutgers Math Teachers’ Circle (RUMTC) was founded in 2014 and is a member of the national-level Math Teachers’ Circle Network (http://www.mathteacherscircle.org/), as well as of the National Association of Math Circles (https://www.mathcircles.org/). Our circle is mainly for middle school teachers, but we welcome high school and upper elementary teachers as well. Click here to find out about the next circle and register!

RUMTC - Rutgers Math Teachers' Circle

Mathematics Teachers' Circles consist of groups of mathematicians and K-12 teachers who meet regularly to discuss interesting mathematical problems. The Rutgers Math Teachers’ Circle (RUMTC) was founded in 2014 and is a member of the national-level Math Teachers’ Circle Network (http://www.mathteacherscircle.org/), as well as of the National Association of Math Circles (https://www.mathcircles.org/). Our circle is mainly for middle school teachers, but we welcome high school and upper elementary teachers as well. Click here to find out about the next circle and register!

Test equation

\(2^2\) \[\frac+\frac=1\]\[\frac+\frac\]\(\frac+\frac\)

Transfer Chart - Testing (ARI Smart Content)

Below is an ARI Smart Content module displaying data from a CSV file.  

MATH 025 HOMEWORK PROBLEMS

MATH 025 – ELEMENTARY ALGEBRAHOMEWORK PROBLEMSCHAPTERS 1 –4CHAPTER PROBLEMS1.1 1-11,13-15,23,25,27,29,41-87(EOO)1.2 1-25(EOO), 35-55(EOO), 57-97(EOO)1.3 51-65(EOO),67-74,75,77,83,85.861.4 9-25(Odd),45-51(Odd),73-85(Odd),86,89-921.5 37-41(Odd),47-53(Odd),61-65(Odd),71-77(Odd)1.6 9-25(Odd),39-47(Odd) Chapter Practice Test2.1 23-33(Odd),43-59(Odd)2.2 9,13,17,61-73(Odd),77,792.3 29-39(Odd),45-51(Odd)83-91(Odd)2.4 44,46,52,60,64,662.5 6-18(Even),23-26,28,35-37,41,42,53,54,59-61Chapter Practice Test3.1 22,24,263.2 28.30.32.33.35.37.43.44.47.54,57,58,663.3 19,22,23,26,41,56,71,75,76,83,89,90,93,99,100,105,1093.4 14,18,20,45,49,51,60,643.5 53-63(Odd),79,81,87,90Chapter Practice Test4.1 8,10,21,27,29,41,434.2 4,12,21,22,31,37,41,52,54,844.3 51,53,59,61,65,75,774.4 21,23,35,39,41,43,55,63,65,68,694.5 15,17,21,23,29,35,41,42,46,51,614.6 3,5,7,11,13,17,29,33,38Chapter Practice TestFALL 2020MATH 025 – ELEMENTARY ALGEBRAHOMEWORK PROBLEMSCHAPTERS 5 – 8CHAPTER PROBLEMS5.1 35-49 (Odd Only)5.2 27.29.33.35.37.61.636.1 3,4,5,8,12,146.2 15,17,236.3 1,7,11,15,19,25,29,31,33,38,41,436.4 5,7,9,12Chapter Practice Test7.1 21-37 (Odd Only)7.2 9,11,25,27,41,43,45,61,637.3 21,23,25,27,41,43,45,47,53,557.4 3-11 (Odd Only), 28-34 (Even Only), 46,48,51-57 (Odd Only),63.657.5 5-11 (Odd Only), 39-45 (Odd Only), 61,63,75,77,89,937.6 19-25 (Odd Only), 41-47 (Odd Only), 61,63Chapter Practice Test8.1 19,21,49,51,59,658.2 13-19 (Odd Only), 61,68,69,73,758.3 9.11.17.21.29.358.4 3,7,11,35,41,628.5 11,13,17,19,23 Chapter Practice Test FALL 2020MATH 025 – ELEMENTARY ALGEBRAHOMEWORK PROBLEMSCHAPTERS 9 – 11CHAPTER PROBLEMS9.1 11,13,15,17,27,35,37,399.2 19,21,25,39,41,509.3 17,19,39,41,43,46,53,55,57,619.4 31,35,45,619.5 29,33,37,39,40,41,43,459.6 3,4,6,8,11Chapter 9 Practice Test10.1 11-21 (Odd Only),27,29,31,39,41,43,73,74,7510.2 3,5,7,11,13,15,17,29,31,33,35,37,41,43,49,51,55,83-8610.3 33,35,37,39,43,45,59,6110.4 15,21,33,35,37,53,59,63,65Chapter 10 Practice Test – Problems 1-1111.1 1,3,5,7,9,35,3711.3 15,16,17,18,3811.4 1,3,5,7,9,21,2511.5 5,6,9,12,19,27 Chapter 11 Practice Test – Problems 1-8,10

MATH 026 HOMEWORK PROBLEMS

    MATH 026 – INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA HOMEWORK PROBLEMS CHAPTERS 1 –5 CHAPTER PROBLEMS 1 Practice Test 2.1 1,3,5,6,11,14,15,19,21,25,282.2 21,27,29,35,37,39,41,45,47,49,53,58,59,64,67,73,77,78,832.3 13,16,25,29,37,41,44,47,53,67,812.4 13,19,21,25,27,31,42,51,53,57,66Practice Test 3.1 8,16,23,27,37,41,45,59,61,633.2 1,3,5,9,12,15,16,17,18,19,243.3 1,3,5,7,9,11,13,17,24,25,27,33,35,43,46,47,49,51,53-62,73,74,76,79,83,85,86,873.4 1,3,5,11,1315,17,19,23,27,32,41,43,45,533.5 1,3a,4,5Practice Test 4.1 5,11,13,19,21,29,31,33,35,43,45,47,49,51,55,57,59,63,654.2 5,11,13,19,21,29,31,33,35,37,43,45,47,49,51,55,57,59,63,6569,714.3 1,5,9,10,12,17,27,29,35,39,474.4 17,26,29,37,39,46,53,57Practice Test 5.1 2,4,10,14,15,255.2 7,15,19,21,23,31,39,45,55,58,69,71,76,78,79,805.3 1-21 (Odd only),53,57,58,63,83,85,93,94,955.4 1,3,5,7,23,29,37,395.5 1,3,11,13,17,19,28,33,35,36,46,49,52,1135.6 1,5,11,13,19,21,25,45,59,61,66,68,705.7 1,5,11,15,19Practice Test       MATH 026 – INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA HOMEWORK PROBLEMS CHAPTERS 6 – 8   CHAPTER PROBLEMS 6.1 1,3,11,12,13,16,17,196.2 9,11,13,19,23,34,36,39,41,436.3 7,13,17,19,21,23,27,31,38,41,45,486.4 3,7,21,29,33,39,43,45,61,63,77,826.5 1,3,5,9,11,13,23,35,37,46,486.6 3,7,9,19,23,25,27,45,49,57,61,71,75,806.7 5,11,15,17,21,25,27,29,33,37,39,45,466.8 11,12,21,23,27,28,33,47,61Practice Test 7.1 1,5,9,25,37,43,51,53,55,61,62,65,71,73,75,77,79,85,87,93,997.2 5,7,15,23,27,31,33,417.3 1,5,9,21,25,29,33,35,37,47,49,53,59,61,65,68,71,72,87,88,89,91,93,99,1017.4 7,11,19,21,25,27,29,35,39,41,51,61,69,717.5 3,5,19,25,31,33,37,45,557.6 7,19,27,37,43,49,577.7 3,4,7,8,17,27,29,39,41,627.8 1,3,7,13,15,17,19,23,25,27,33,41,53,57,61,63,69Practice Test 8.1 1, 4a, 5a, 10a8.2 1,3,7,13,15,19,21,23,31,36,43,69,77,81,89,91,958.3 1,58.4 5,7,11,13,15,21-39 (Odd only),53,57,63,65,718.5 3,5,7,11,13,29,31,33,35,37,39,41,45,49,53,678.6 29,33,37,39,47,518.7 9,11,13,15,29,31,37,39,51,528.8 3,15,29,33,37,41,43,47,61,63,71,73Practice Test

Math 111 Course Schedule

Lecture Sections Topics Homework Problems 1 1.1 The Real Numbers; Begin Exponents and Radicals. #16, 40, 42, 43, 50, 51, 55, 63, 76 1.2 #17, 31, 35, 83, 85, 87, 98, 100 2 1.2 Finish Exponents and Radicals. # 12, 23, 25, 27, 28, 42, 47, 48, 67, 68, 76, 80, 81, 82, 102, 103 3 1.3 Algebraic Expressions; Begin Fractional Expressions. #35, 41, 49, 52, 57, 58, 60, 65, 66, 67, 70, 81, 86, 90, 92, 93, 96, 101, 102, 115, 122 1.4 # 34, 35, 42, 45, 51, 55, 58 4 1.4 Finish Fractional Expressions. #67, 70, 73, 74, 83, 92, 93 5 1.5 Equations. #21, 22, 29, 35, 38, 50, 51, 59, 62, 70, 75, 87, 90, 107, 108, 110, 113 6 1.7 Modeling with Equations. # 13, 19, 25, 28, 34, 38, 41, 44, 53, 57, 58, 63, 65, 66, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74 7 1.8 Inequalities. # 17, 33, 35, 37, 41, 48, 61, 67, 70, 73, 75, 81, 86, 101, 121, 123 8 1.9 The Coordinate Plane; Graphs of Equations; Circles. # 17, 18, 31, 36, 41, 52, 67, 69, 91, 92, 95, 99, 100, 105, 109, 111 9 Catch up and Review. 10 EXAM I 11 1.10 Lines. #19, 26, 33, 42, 44, 47, 49, 54, 64, 80, 81, 83, 90, 92, 93 12 1.11 Solving Equations and Inequalities Graphically. #5, 7, 10, 15, 17, 18, 22, 38, 39 13 2.1 Functions. # 11, 12, 21, 25, 32, 33, 46, 49, 51, 53, 54, 63, 64, 65, 66, 79, 80, 81, 88, 90, 91, 92 14 2.2 Graphs of Functions; Getting Information from a Graph #10, 17, 37, 38, 42, 43, 46, 49, 51, 55, 56, 70, 71, 74, 82 2.3 # 7, 8, 9, 31, 34, 37, 38 15 2.5 Linear Functions and Models; Transformation of Functions #7, 12, 13, 18, 22, 28, 33, 40, 43, 49, 50 2.6 # 8, 13, 32, 33, 48, 49, 52, 66, 71, 73, 78, 86, 93 16 2.7 Combining Functions. # 13, 14, 22, 24, 27, 28, 30, 31, 35, 36, 53, 54, 65, 66, 75, 78, 82 17 2.8 One-to-One Functions and Their Inverses. # 9, 10, 11, 12, 19, 20, 26, 27, 43, 45, 51, 59, 67, 69, 70, 72, 80, 87, 88 18 Catch up and Review. 19 EXAM II 20 pp 237-244 Modeling with Functions; Modeling Variation. #3, 6, 12, 13, 14, 21, 22, 25, 26, 27, 30 1.12 #15, 17, 20, 24, 28, 37, 42, 47 21 3.1 Quadratic Functions and Models. #15, 18, 30, 33, 35, 46, 51, 53, 55 22 3.2 Polynomial Functions. #7, 8, 9-14, 18, 20, 31, 42, 47, 57, 58, 66, 74, 75, 87, 90 23 3.3 Dividing Polynomials. #7, 18, 23, 34, 42, 47, 54, 64 24 1.6 Complex Numbers. #10, 16, 19, 20, 29, 32, 39, 54, 68, 69 25 3.5 Complex Zeros and The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. #11, 12, 25, 27, 33, 40, 58, 67 26 3.6 Rational Functions. #11, 25, 27, 28, 35, 43, 44, 54, 55, 79, 80, 87, 88 27 3.7 Polynomial and Rational Inequalities #3, 7, 19, 27, 35, 37, 42, 47 28 Catch up and Review

Math 111 Course Schedule

Lecture Sections Topics Homework Problems 1 1.1 The Real Numbers; Begin Exponents and Radicals. #16, 40, 42, 43, 50, 51, 55, 63, 76 1.2 #17, 31, 35, 83, 85, 87, 98, 100 2 1.2 Finish Exponents and Radicals. # 12, 23, 25, 27, 28, 42, 47, 48, 67, 68, 76, 80, 81, 82, 102, 103 3 1.3 Algebraic Expressions; Begin Fractional Expressions. #35, 41, 49, 52, 57, 58, 60, 65, 66, 67, 70, 81, 86, 90, 92, 93, 96, 101, 102, 115, 122 1.4 # 34, 35, 42, 45, 51, 55, 58 4 1.4 Finish Fractional Expressions. #67, 70, 73, 74, 83, 92, 93 5 1.5 Equations. #21, 22, 29, 35, 38, 50, 51, 59, 62, 70, 75, 87, 90, 107, 108, 110, 113 6 1.7 Modeling with Equations. # 13, 19, 25, 28, 34, 38, 41, 44, 53, 57, 58, 63, 65, 66, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74 7 1.8 Inequalities. # 17, 33, 35, 37, 41, 48, 61, 67, 70, 73, 75, 81, 86, 101, 121, 123 8 1.9 The Coordinate Plane; Graphs of Equations; Circles. # 17, 18, 31, 36, 41, 52, 67, 69, 91, 92, 95, 99, 100, 105, 109, 111 9 Catch up and Review. 10 EXAM I 11 1.10 Lines. #19, 26, 33, 42, 44, 47, 49, 54, 64, 80, 81, 83, 90, 92, 93 12 1.11 Solving Equations and Inequalities Graphically. #5, 7, 10, 15, 17, 18, 22, 38, 39 13 2.1 Functions. # 11, 12, 21, 25, 32, 33, 46, 49, 51, 53, 54, 63, 64, 65, 66, 79, 80, 81, 88, 90, 91, 92 14 2.2 Graphs of Functions; Getting Information from a Graph #10, 17, 37, 38, 42, 43, 46, 49, 51, 55, 56, 70, 71, 74, 82 2.3 # 7, 8, 9, 31, 34, 37, 38 15 2.5 Linear Functions and Models; Transformation of Functions #7, 12, 13, 18, 22, 28, 33, 40, 43, 49, 50 2.6 # 8, 13, 32, 33, 48, 49, 52, 66, 71, 73, 78, 86, 93 16 2.7 Combining Functions. # 13, 14, 22, 24, 27, 28, 30, 31, 35, 36, 53, 54, 65, 66, 75, 78, 82 17 2.8 One-to-One Functions and Their Inverses. # 9, 10, 11, 12, 19, 20, 26, 27, 43, 45, 51, 59, 67, 69, 70, 72, 80, 87, 88 18 Catch up and Review. 19 EXAM II 20 pp 237-244 Modeling with Functions; Modeling Variation. #3, 6, 12, 13, 14, 21, 22, 25, 26, 27, 30 1.12 #15, 17, 20, 24, 28, 37, 42, 47 21 3.1 Quadratic Functions and Models. #15, 18, 30, 33, 35, 46, 51, 53, 55 22 3.2 Polynomial Functions. #7, 8, 9-14, 18, 20, 31, 42, 47, 57, 58, 66, 74, 75, 87, 90 23 3.3 Dividing Polynomials. #7, 18, 23, 34, 42, 47, 54, 64 24 1.6 Complex Numbers. #10, 16, 19, 20, 29, 32, 39, 54, 68, 69 25 3.5 Complex Zeros and The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. #11, 12, 25, 27, 33, 40, 58, 67 26 3.6 Rational Functions. #11, 25, 27, 28, 35, 43, 44, 54, 55, 79, 80, 87, 88 27 3.7 Polynomial and Rational Inequalities #3, 7, 19, 27, 35, 37, 42, 47 28 Catch up and Review

Test article 2020-08-27

Abstract: This is joint work with Anders Buch and Enrico Fatighenti. We discover a family of surfaces of general type with \(K^2=3\) and \(p=q=0\) as free \(C_\) quotients of special linear cuts of the octonionic projective plane \(\mathbb O \mathbb P^2\). A special member of the family has \(3\) singularities of type \(A_2\), and is a quotient of a fake projective plane, which we construct explicitly.

Undergraduate Honors Committee

Chair: Michael Beals Members: Janos Komlos, Jian Song

Resources for Visitors

Please contact Jade Oliveras for assistance: Travel Reimbursements: Travel Reimbursement Form Hotel Accommodations: Hotel Reservations Honorarium: Honorarium Request Form ICED Form Consultants: ICED Form Statement of Work Form  Non-Employee Travel Approval: Non-Employee Request Form Fly America Act

Master Textbook List - Fall 2022

Frequently Asked Questions

Information for undergraduates Disclaimer: This page is provided by the mathematics department for informational purposes only. Official policies are found elsewhere and this FAQ may be out of date or oversimplified in some cases. Placement Special Permission Grade Appeal Prerequisite Override Transfer or pre-approval Late Withdrawal Final Exam Schedule Repeating Courses Auditing Courses Academic Advising The Math Major Second Baccalaureate Clubs Academic Integrity Academic Calendar Office of Judicial Affairs SAS Deans   Placement Questions Q. How do I schedule a placement test?A. You can register for a placement test on-line at the Office of Institutional Research. Other questions regarding the schedule of placement exams can be addressed to April Pagano at 732-932-8445.Q. Where can I find my mathematics placement code?A. You can use Degree Navigator to review all SAS and major requirements. The placement result is given under the program "SAS Liberal Arts General Education Requirements". Please note however that whenever you need to see your placement score, you probably need to consult our academic advising staff as well.Q. What is a mathematics placement code?A typical code is MA:640:PCAThis is read as follows: MA: Math placement test 640: Mathematics courses PCA: Pre-calculus. You are eligible to take a pre-calculus course See the full list of placement codes. More placement advice Special Permission Questions Q. What is a special permission number?A. A number issued by the mathematics department when departmental permission is required for entry into a section of a course. There are two possible reasons for this: The course as a whole requires departmental permission (most honors courses and other special courses). The section is fully enrolled (closed). Q. How do I apply for a special permission number to enter a closed section of a course?A. Use the on-line system, which opens shortly before the beginning of the term. See the special permission web page for details. There are a few exceptions to this: Graduate students and other students not enrolled as full-time undergraduates submit the non-matriculated student form from our forms page before the beginning of the term. These forms will be reviewed together with the matriculated student requests, around the beginning of the term. Honors courses require a separate application, available on our forms page. Summer school courses: write to   Q. How do I apply for permission to enter an honors course?A. Submit the form for special permission for honors courses found on our Forms page. This requests a link to your transcript. If you have the transcript but no link for it, you may submit a paper copy at the Undergraduate Office, Hill 303.Q. What credit limits apply during registration?A. For most students, registration is limited to 18 credits until the beginning of the term. For details consult the registrar's webpage.More information on special permission numbers Grade Appeal Questions Q. How do I appeal or file a complaint about a grade in a math course?A. Students wishing to file a complaint about a course grade, or a grade received for a particular piece of work in a course, should first attempt to resolve the matter through discussion with the instructor. If the issue cannot be satisfactorily resolved between student and instructor, the student may specify in writing the basis for the complaint and request a review by the math department's ombudsperson. To begin this process, the student needs to contact the department office and ask for the "ombudsman appeal form." A written complaint about a grade for work completed while the course is in progress must be submitted to the math department's ombudsperson no later than two weeks after notification of the grade. A student must submit a written complaint about a final course grade to the math department's ombudsperson no later than four weeks after the end of the exam period for that term. The decision reached by the ombudsperson is considered the decision of the department.The undergraduate office can be reached by phone at (848) 445-2390 (press 2 for undergraduate office) or by email at . To find out the procedure for appealing the decision of the department, please visit the SAS grade appeals page Prerequisite Overrides Q.  What is a prerequisite override?A. The Mathematics Department can override a prerequisite requirement if you have satisfied the requirement in a way that is not recognized by the registration computer (late transfer, proficiency, or an unusual course outside the department).More information about proficiency examinationsQ. How do I apply for a prerequisite override?A. Contact the Head Mathematics Advisor at . Transfer or Pre-Approval of Courses Taken Elsewhere Q. As a transfer student arriving at Rutgers, how do I get my courses taken elsewhere evaluated for credit at Rutgers?A. See the Head advisor. For courses taken outside the state of New Jersey bring in a syllabus if possible.References: Math Dept. Transfer Chart; NJTransfer Q. As a continuing Rutgers student, when and how do I get approval of courses I wish to take elsewhere?A. Before registering for a summer course in mathematics taken elsewhere, see the Head Advisor to review your prerequisites and the acceptability of the course. No course given in a session of less than 5 weeks is accepted. Late Withdrawal Q. May I request a  late withdrawal?A. In extraordinary circumstances, such requests would be made through your dean. If they feel the request has merit, they will request further information from the mathematics department, and they may give you a form to bring to us, or they may contact us directly. Failure to attend class is not sufficient grounds for a late withdrawal. Final Exam Schedule Q.How do I determine my  final exam schedule?A.The Scheduling Office has a  final exam webpage. Log in to get your full examination schedule (dates and times). Rooms should be assigned, and announced in class,  about two weeks before the end of term. Dates should be checked at the beginning of term for possible conflicts, and brought to the attention of the instructor immediately.Q. (a) What is an exam conflict, and (b) how are they resolved?A.(a) A conflict is: two exams scheduled for the same period; 3 or more exams for the same day; 3 or more exams in consecutive examination periods (reference).(b) To resolve the conflict, print out your schedule at finalexams.rutgers.edu and show it to your instructor. It is up to the instructors involved to reschedule one of the exams. If one of the classes is a large lecture, this is generally the one for which a makeup is most easily arranged. Repeating Courses Q. May I repeat a course? A. Yes, but different rules apply depending on the original grade received: Grade of D or F; or Courses passed with a C or better. SAS students should read the statement of SAS policies for repeated courses and others should consult their deans. Auditing Courses Q. May I audit a course?A.Full time students, and senior citizens(aged 62 and above), may audit courses at Rutgers. Some limitations apply. Reference Academic Advising Q. I need to see the Head Advisor. What is the advising schedule?A. The schedule is posted on the Advising Office home page. No appointment is necessary. For basic skills and precalculus (through 115) consult Lew Hirsch. For all other courses (103-107, calculus, and above) consult our Head Advisor. Routine business can be conducted by email to : The Math Major Q. How do I declare a math major?A. See this page for the form. To be admitted into the mathematics major program, a student must normally have completed three terms of calculus with a grade of C or better in each course. To continue as a mathematics major, a student is expected to make satisfactory progress toward completing the program. Under normal circumstances, satisfactory progress for a full-time student means completion of at least one mathematics course each term, at an appropriate level, with a grade of C or better.More information about the major Second Baccalaureate Q: Can I take a second bachelor's degree at Rutgers?A: Yes, with thirty additional credits in SAS, and subject to certain other requirements including those of your major, see the SAS Degree Requirements page. Student Organizations Q: Where can I find information about Student Organizations at Rutgers?A: See the site getinvolved.rutgers.edu for information about organizations, including the registration process for new organizations. Academic Integrity Q: What are the rules concerning academic integrity, and how are they enforced?A: There is a detailed policy, administered by the Office of Judicial Affairs. Full information can be found at their Academic Integrity page. Students need to be aware of the policy and the penalties for violations of the code. In the mathematics department, all complaints regarding cheating or other violations of the code are referred through the Undergraduate Office to the Office of Judicial Affairs, and are followed up. The Academic Calendar Q. What happens to the schedule Thanksgiving week?A. Usually, the Tuesday before Thanksgiving follows a Thursday schedule and the Wednesday before Thanksgiving follows a Friday schedule. (But not always; check the calendar!) 3 year Academic Calendar Office of Judicial Affairs Academic Integrity SAS Deans For general Academic Advising SAS students may consult the Office of Academic Services. Disclaimer: Posted for informational purposes only This material is posted by the faculty of the Mathematics Department at Rutgers New Brunswick for informational purposes. Some information may be out of date, or a simplified formulation of official policy.

Syllabi

syllabus repository

Course Schedule

View the Spring 2024 Schedule

Graduate Student Awards

Mathematics Graduate Program External Awards 2022: Brittany Gelb won an NSF-GRF Fellowship. 2021: Lucy Martinez won an NSF-GRF Fellowship. 2020: Victoria Chayes won an NDSEG Fellowship. 2019: William Cole Franks won SGS Distinguished Scholarly Achievement Award, Matthew Charnley won SAS Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education (Graduate Student Category), Marco Castronovo won award for Off-Campus Dissertation Development Funding from SGS, Navin Aksornthong was awarded a Queen Sirikit Scholarship 2018: Tamar Lichter won an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, Kelly Spendlove won an NSF GROW Fellowship, Takehiko Gappo was awarded a Kiyo Sakaguchi Scholarship  2017: Edna Jones and Holly Mandel each won an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Incoming student Victoria Chayes won an NDSEG Fellowship, Cesar Ramirez Ibanez was awarded a CONACYT Scholarship  2016: Bryan Ek won a SMART fellowship, Howard Nuer won an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship, Corrine Yap won an NJSGC Fellowship 2015:  Katie McKeon won a CCICADA Fellowship 2014: Kelly Spendlove was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship 2014: Lillian (Katy) Crow-Craig won an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship. 2013: John Kim won an NSF-GRF Fellowship; Lihua Huang won an honorable mention in the NSF-GRF application; (incoming student) William Franks won an NDSEG Fellowship. 2012: Siao-Hao Guo won a Taiwan Fellowship 2012: Lillian (Katy) Crow-Craig won an honorable mention in the NSF-GRF application. 2011: Glen Wilson won an honorable mention in the NSF-GRF application. 2010: Wesley Pegden won an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship. 2009: Philip M. Wood won an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship. 2008: Chris Stucchio won an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship. 2007: Vincent Vatter won an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Prospective Students

Program Overview for Prospective Ph.D. Applicants We appreciate your interest in our graduate program. Here is a brief overview of select highlights of our program. A highly ranked graduate program, consistently in the top 25 nationwide. A large and distinguished graduate faculty (approximately 65 members in the mathematics department, and 20 additional members in other departments affiliated with the mathematics graduate program) with expertise in a wide range of areas of mathematics including algebra, analysis, geometry and topology, logic, number theory, applied analysis, discrete mathematics and mathematical physics. About 20 formal graduate courses each semester, and a large number of weekly seminars in mathematics and related subjects. Students and faculty frequently attend seminars at Columbia, CUNY, the Institute for Advanced Study, NYU, and Princeton. Excellent fellow students from whom you will learn a lot. Our students come from a wide variety of domestic and foreign backgrounds. In recent years we have typically received about 300 applications per year, and typically 14-16 have enrolled each year. The student/faculty ratio is very favorable, with about 75 Ph.D. students and about the same number of graduate faculty. Among recent graduates, Howard Nuer, Katy Craig, C. Stucchio, W. Pegden and P. Wood have won NSF Postdoctoral Fellowships, R. Holowinsky and X. Li have won Sloan Fellowships, and R. Holowinsky has won the Sastra Ramanujan Prize. Many have found tenure or tenure-track jobs in leading universities and colleges. Excellent financial support: Almost all of our current PhD students have been on full financial support in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships since their arrival  (TA nine month stipends are USD 25,969 for fall 2016; fellowship stipends vary from USD 25,000 to USD 35,000; 5 of the 15 Ph.D. students who entered in fall of 2016 are on fellowships); and we try to maintain financial support to all full-time Ph.D. students making good progress in our program. Teaching and research assistants are university employees, with full health benefits. Fellows get health insurance from a separate plan. A high completion rate. More than 75% of students who join our program obtain a Ph.D. A solid record of job placement. Close to 90% of our graduates in the period 2000-2015 have found an initial position in academia; others opted for employment in industry or government. A commitment to training students to be teachers as well as researchers, and to building a diverse population of students. A large campus supporting a wide range of activities, with an easy train ride to New York City and Princeton. The Atlantic Ocean and good hiking are also close by! For Admissions information, click on Admissions to the right. Frequently Asked Questions about apply to the Math Graduate Program at Rutgers -     FAQs

Program Description

Graduate Degree Programs in the Mathematical Sciences The graduate faculty of Rutgers-New Brunswick offers a variety of degree programs for students interested in the Mathematical Sciences. Some of these are offered by the Mathematics faculty, while others are operated by other units of the university. Degree Programs offered by the Graduate Faculty in Mathematics Ph.D. in MathematicsThis is a rigorous program in Mathematics consisting of extensive course work and original research in one of the department's many fields of expertise leading to a dissertation. The program is typically completed in five or six years. Applicants to the program should have a strong undergraduate background in Mathematics. Joint Ph.D. in Mathematics and Quantitative Biomedicine (QB) There is a new opportunity for students interested in interdisciplinary graduate research and training to earn a joint Ph.D. degree in Mathematics and  Quantitative Biomedicine (QB). The joint Ph.D. program is designed to provide depth of study in mathematics as well as interdisciplinary breadth of study in a quantitative area of the life sciences. Joint Ph.D. students will follow the requirements (coursework, qualifying exams, etc) of the Mathematics program, working with an advisor to strategize on how to best align and streamline the coursework requirements. In addition, education of joint Ph.D. students includes approximately five courses of an interdisciplinary nature: one foundational course in biochemistry and/or molecular biology, one or two 3-credit courses at the interface of mathematics and the life sciences, two 1-credit seminars, and one time taking the 2-credit Winter Session Interdisciplinary Quantitative Biology Boot Camp. Some of these courses are expected to also satisfy the requirements of the Mathematics program. Joint Ph.D. students will pursue research that will involve exploration at the interface of the quantitative and life sciences.Applications for the joint degree are made through the standard Mathematics program application channels, with a specific indication of interest in the joint Ph.D. program with QB (in the essay/personal statement). Students will earn a joint Ph.D. degree that not only reflects the full credentials of the core discipline Ph.D., but also broad interdisciplinary training that enables graduates to direct research at the interface of the quantitative and life sciences. More details about the QB program can be found here. M.S. in Mathematics - Mathematical Finance optionThis program integrates theoretical foundations with practical applications to derivative security pricing. Further information about the M.S.- Mathematical Finance option. M.S. in Mathematics - Traditional optionThe faculty of mathematics also offers a "traditional" Masters in Mathematics degree.Further information for prospective students: M.S. - Traditional option. Non-degree study in MathematicsAdmission to non-degree study allows a student to take graduate courses without being in a degree program. The standard limit for non-degree study is 6 credits per semester and 12 credits in total. Further information for prospective students: Non-degree study. Other units of Rutgers - New Brunswick that offer Mathematics related graduate programs Statistics and Biostatistics Graduate Program Rutgers Center for Operations Research (RUTCOR) Center for Quantitative Biology (formerly BIOMAPS) The Graduate School of Education offers masters and doctoral degrees specifically focused on Mathematics Education. The Rutgers Professional Science Master's Program offers the Master of Business and Science. The MBS degree is part of a national movement of Professional Science Master's programs that brings together master's level study in science, engineering, and math with "plus" courses in business and policy. The MBS has several areas of concentration related to Mathematics, including Actuarial Science and Industrial Mathematics.

Pre-Enrollment Program

Special Pre-enrollment Program in Mathematics at Rutgers Our two-week orientation program (SPP) will take place from Monday, August 19, 2024 through Friday, August 30, 2024 (no weekend days).  The Written Qualifying Exam schedule is as follows. Students have 2.5 hours to complete the exam within the time frames Indicated: Algebra (8:00am-5:00pm, Monday, 8/26/24)  Complex Analysis (8:00am-5:00pm, Tuesday, 8/27/24)  Real Analysis (8:00am-5:00pm, Wednesday, 8/28/24) We have planned many "Glimpse Talks" by faculty members to give an idea of the research being done at Rutgers. This is also an opportunity for new students to meet each other and to get acquainted with faculty members and continuing graduate students. All Glimpse Talks, Review Problem Sessions, and other presentations will be held in Hill 705. The following three orientation sessions run by the School of Graduate Studies are very important and attendance is required.  The School of Graduate Studies will email you regarding them.  The orientations will be available for viewing online at any time on or after August 1st via Canvas links provided by email or the School of Graduate Studies website:  Home | Rutgers School of Graduate Studies International Teaching Assistant Orientation – International students only Teaching Assistant Orientation – International and domestic students New Student Orientation – International and domestic students Last year's SPP Schedule:  (will be updated soon) Monday, August 21, 2023 9:30am – 10:00am: Breakfast in Hill 703 (for New Students and Liaison Committee) 10:00am – 10:30am: Introduction by the Graduate Director, Paul Feehan 11:00am – 12:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Paul Feehan - Title: Gauge theory and geometric analysis  12:00pm – 1:00pm:  Lunch in Hill 703  (for New Students and Liaison Committee Members, and Current Students) 1:00pm – 1:30pm:  Meet with Technology Staff in Hill 705 - Emails, computers, etc.  1:30pm – 2:30pm: Glimpse Talk by James Lepowsky - Title: Vertex operator algebra theory 2:50pm – 3:50pm:   Glimpse Talk by Dennis Kriventsov - Title: Some open problems in elliptic PDE and free boundaries 4:10pm – 5:30pm: Algebra Problem Review Session - Nilava Metya Tuesday, August 22, 2023 9:20am – 10:40am: Real Analysis Problem Review Session - Anthony Matos 11:00am – 12:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Vladimir Retakh - Title: Noncommutative versions of some classical invariants 2:00pm – 3:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Jeff Kahn - Title: Probability in combinatorics 3:20pm – 4:40pm: Algebra Problem Review Session - Nilava Metya Wednesday, August 23, 2023 9:20am – 10:40am: Complex Analysis Problem Review Session - Ishaan Shah 11:00am – 12:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Chris Woodward - Title:  Hamiltonian flows 12:00pm – 1:00pm :  Lunch in Hill 703 (for New Students, Liaison Committee Members, and Faculty Glimpse Speakers) 2:00pm – 3:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Kristen Hendricks  - Title: Classical and modern invariants of knots 3:20pm – 4:40pm: Algebra Problem Review Session - Nilava Metya Thursday, August 24, 2023 9:20am – 10:40am: Real Analysis Problem Review Session - Anthony Matos  11:00am – 12:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Fioralba Cakoni – Title: Inside out 2:00pm – 3:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Yanyan Li - Title: Symmetry of Hypersurfaces and the Hopf Lemma 3:20pm – 4:40pm:  Complex Analysis Problem Review Session - Ishaan Shah Friday, August 25, 2023 9:20am – 10:40am: Real Analysis Problem Review Session -  Anthony Matos 11:00am – 12:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Kasper Larsen - Title: Mathematical finance 12:00pm – 1:00pm:  Lunch in Hill 703 and presentation "What every Math grad student should know" by the Mathematics Student Liaison Committee (for New Students, Liaison Committee Members, and Current Students) 2:00pm – 3:00pm: Complex Analysis Problem Review Session - Ishaan Shah Monday, August 28, 2023 8:00am – 5:00pm (students have 2.5 hours to complete the exam within this time frame): Algebra Written Qualifying Exam (online via CANVAS). Tuesday, August 29, 2023 8:00am – 5:00pm (students have 2.5 hours to complete the exam within this time frame):  Complex Analysis Written Qualifying Exam (online via CANVAS). Wednesday, August 30, 2023 8:00am – 5:00pm (students have 2.5 hours to complete the exam within this time frame):  Real Analysis Written Qualifying Exam (online via CANVAS). Thursday, August 31, 2023 9:30am-10:30am:  Glimpse Talk by Shadi Tahvildar-Zadeh - Title: What is Mathematical Physics? 10:45am – 11:45am: Glimpse Talk by Michael Vogelius - Title:  Visibility vs Invisibility 2:00pm – 3:00pm: Glimpse Talk by Sagun Chanillo  - Title:  Geometry and the Laplace operator 3:15pm – 4:15pm: Glimpse Talk by Yi-Zhi Huang - Title: Conformal field theories TBA - Required Grader Orientation Meeting presented by Professor Ioanna Mavrea regarding grading. Friday, September 1, 2023 9:30am – 10:30am: Glimpse Talk by Alex Kontorovich - Title: Interactive Theorem Proving 10:45am – 11:45am: Glimpse Talk by Dima Sinapova - Title: Modern set theory and open problems 12:00pm – 1:00pm: Mathematics Department Welcome Lunch in Hill 703 for New Students, Current Students, Postdocs, and Faculty 1:00pm – 1:30pm:  Introduction to Library Resources with Mei Ling Lo - Hill 705 2:00pm – 3:00pm:  Glimpse Talk by Filippo Calderoni - Title:  Groups, orders, and classification 3:15pm – 4:15pm:  Glimpse Talk by Maxime Van de Moortel - Title: Mathematical Analysis and black holes: the inside story  

Your Second Year of Graduate Study

During their first year, most Ph.D. students concentrate on coursework and the written qualifying exam. After completing the written exam (usually by the beginning of the second year), students change their focus to (1) identifying potential research advisors and research topics, and (2) selecting qualifying exam topics and a qualifying exam committee.

Learning Goals and Assessment

The goals of the Ph.D. program in Mathematics are (i) to train students at an advanced level on scholarship, through extensive course work and original research in one of our department's many fields of expertise leading to a dissertation, and (ii) to train students to become competent and effective teachers, so as to prepare students to assume positions of leadership in research, teaching, and service in education, industry, and government.

Ph.D. Fellowship in Mathematics: Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN)

The Graduate Program is the recent recipient of a grant from the U.S. Department of Education that will provide a total of at least 9 generous one year graduate fellowships for Ph.D. students in Mathematics between 2012 and 2015. All qualified applicants will be considered for GAANN Fellowships as well as other types of financial aid, including teaching assistantships and other fellowships. Program Features: Fellowship Stipend: Successful candidates will receive a GAANN Fellowship of $30,000* for their first year of graduate study. They will also receive full tuition and student fees. Subject to satisfactory academic performance, students will continue to receive financial support (in the form of a teaching assistantship, fellowship or graduate assistantship) for a total of five years, or until completion of their Ph.D. (whichever comes first). *This amount may be adjusted so as not to exceed the fellow's demonstrated level of financial need (as calculated for purposes of the Federal student financial aid programs under Title IV, part F of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended). Academic Standing: Fellows must maintain full-time status in the Mathematics Ph.D. Program. Fellows must be engaged in full-time coursework or research during the summer. Eligibility: GAANN requires that in selecting individuals to receive fellowships, an academic department shall consider only individuals who: Are currently enrolled as graduate students or have been accepted at the grantee institution; Have an excellent academic record; Have financial need; Are planning to pursue the highest possible degree available in their course of study (in our case, a Ph.D.); Are planning a career in teaching or research; Are not ineligible to receive assistance under 34 CFR 75.60 (in default on a Federal loan); and Are citizens, nationals, or permanent residents of the United States; provide evidence from the Immigration and Naturalization Service that they are in the United States for other than a temporary purpose with the intention of becoming permanent residents; or are citizens of any one of the Freely Associated States (the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau). We particularly encourage applications from students from traditionally underrepresented groups. Application Procedure: To apply for a GAANN Fellowship, you must: Submit an application for graduate school at Rutgers University. Specify the Mathematics graduate program. Applications for admission in the fall are due January 15. In your personal statement, mention an interest in the GAANN Fellowship. Provide evidence of financial need by submitting a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You can complete the FAFSA online at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. In step 6, enter 002629 for the Federal School Code for Rutgers. We urge you to submit this form as soon as possible to expedite your application.    

Preparing for the First Semester Core Courses

The three core graduate mathematics courses normally taken in the first semester are: 640:501 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I (Offered every fall) (Outline of topics) 640:551 Abstract Algebra I (Offered every fall) (Outline of topics) 640:503 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I (Offered every fall) (Outline of topics) Here are links to information about the preparation expected of students entering 640:501, 640:503 and 640:551. Students are encouraged to review this material in the months before the semester begins.

The Rutgers Math Ph.D. program ranked highly in the recent National Research Council Study

The National Research Council recently announced the results of its extensive Assessment of Research Doctorate Programs . The NRC study data were collected in 2006 and concerned with the period of several years prior to 2006. Concerning our Ph.D. program here at Rutgers: the NRC study recognizes the general excellence of our program. Among 127 mathematics PhD programs nationwide, our overall rankings based on two different methods are: Regression based, 12-36; Survey based, 14-41. The study also provided separate rankings for the following sub-categories: Research, 10-30; Student Outcomes, 36-96; Important: read more on student outcomes Diversity, 55-89.  As is evident this NRC study does not produce a single, linear ranking of program qualities. It uses a sophisticated, statistics based methodology. Here is a brief explanation of the NRC ranking methodology, andhere contains a detailed description by NRC of the NRC ranking methodology. The numbers provided in each rating reflects the range between the 5th and the 95th percentile of our rankings.  One way to extract linear orderings of all programs from the NRC data would be to compare their rankings at the 5th and 95th percentile. For the Regression-based Overall Ranking the data in the NRC Study shows that there are 17 programs ranked above Rutgers at the 5th percentile and 15 programs ranked above Rutgers at the 95th percentile. For the Survey-based Overall Ranking there are 24 programs ranked above at both percentiles. The NRC data give our program high marks for Percent Faculty with Grants; Citations per Publication; Publications per Allocated Faculty; Percent 1st yr Student w/ Full Support (100%); Percent Non-Asian Minority Faculty; Percent International Students. Our lower rankings on Student Outcomes are based on below average scores in the NRC study on Percent Completing within 6 Years and on Percent Students in Academic Positions . We are proud of our record in both of these areas, and believe the statistics reported in the NRC study do not provide an accurate picture of our program. Here is a link that discusses the graduation rate within our Ph.D. program Here is a link that discusses the success of our graduates in finding academic employment.    

The PhD completion data of the Rutgers Math Ph.D. program since 1995

The PhD completion data of the Rutgers Math Ph.D. program since 1995 Mathematics Graduate Program   Entry YearSize of entering class# of PhDs completed# of PhDs completed by May of 6th year of entry# of PhDs completed by October of 6th year of entryPhD completion rate# of students who left with MS 1995 10 8 7 7 80% 2 1996 13 8 6 7 61.5% 3 1997 14 10 4 6 71.4% 2 1998 18 10 6 7 55.6% 2 1999 16 15 12 14 93.4% 1 2000 12 4 3 3 33.3% 1 2001 13 10 9 9 76.9% 1 2002 11 8 4 6 72.7% 1 2003 16 13 8 11 81.2% 1 2004 17 14 6 8 82.3% 1 2005 13 7 7 7 53.8% 1 2006 14 13 6 8 92.8% 1 2007 17 16 7 9 94.1% 1 2008 12 11 6 8 92.3% 1 2009 13 9 7 8 69.2% 2 2010 17 11 9 11 (2 still active) ≥ 64.7% 1 Total 218 167 107 129 ≥ 76.6% 22 The data in the table above lists students by their year of entrance. Another way to analyze completion data is to examine the completion time of recent PhD graduates. Of the 69 Ph.D.'s completed between Jan. 2005 and Oct. 2011, 30 completed in 5 years or less, 54 completed in 6 years or less. The average completion time is 5.73 years, 43.5% of them completed within 5 years, and over 78% completed within 6 years.

Overview of Orientation Activities for Incoming PhD Students

This page contains some information to help get you oriented for your arrival. You will be notified by email as more information is added. Course selection   Information about selecting your first semester courses. Option for "Free" attempt at the written qualifying exam. The written qualifying exam is required of all Ph.D. students. Students are normally allowed two attempts, and most students make their first attempt at the beginning of their second year in the program. However, entering students who believe they may be prepared for the exam, may take the exam at the beginning of the semester they arrive. This attempt does not count towards the two attempts otherwise allowed. Faculty Mentor Each entering student will be assigned a Faculty Mentor sometime during the summer, who will serve as your advisor until you select a research advisor (usually during your second or third year). Activities during the last two weeks of August Mathematics Department orientation and pre-enrollment lectures: Pre-enrollment Lectures The activities will include: Orientation information for the program, Introductory mathematics lecture series by faculty, with problem sessions led by senior graduate students. Expository lectures by advanced graduate students about their dissertation research Food and welcoming events. All entering math Ph.D. and M.S. (traditional option) students should plan to attend. University-wide orientation for new graduate students     All students should attend one of these two sessions. Further information will be sent to students by the graduate school. University-wide Teaching Assistant Orientation All students who have appointments as a teaching assistant  for the first time should attend. Those entering students supported on fellowships are also urged to attend, as attendance of this orientation will be required when their support source becomes teaching assistant. University-wide Orientation for new international Teaching Assistants All entering students from abroad who have a Teaching Assistantship should attend. English language proficiency test New international students appointed as teaching assistants are required to take an English proficiency test soon after arrival at the university regardless of their TOEFL scores, and may be obligated to take one or more semesters of course work in English as a Second Language (ESL), depending on the outcome of  this proficiency test. Such competence is assessed by the Rutgers Graduate English Language Learners (Grad ELL) program.  The Grad ELL will be using a new proficiency test starting this summer; more information about the test will be posted at the Grad ELL site as it becomes available. Some of the posted test schedules conflict with our written qualifying exam schedules; if you would like to take the free trial of our written qualifying exams, our Graduate Secretary will help you to try to schedule your Grad ELL test in early September. Reappointment as a TA in mathematics cannot be made until ESL has certified that the candidate possesses adequate competence in oral English (both speaking and understanding the spoken language). In some cases ESL will grant provisional certification conditioned on continuing work in their courses.  A student with a passable, but not high level of competence in English will find that this may affect their performance on their courses and exams, on their performance on their TA duties, and on their professional growth in general! Thus non-native speakers of English are urged strongly to talk about mathematics in English with other students, and practice writing essays/summaries in English from the beginning of their graduate study! Constant practice in conversational English in and out of class,  and in writing expository mathematics in English will bring professional rewards to non-native English speakers in their graduate study and professional growth. Further information will be sent to students by the graduate school.   Mathematics Written qualifying exams The three 2-hour exams will be given in the afternoons of Tuesday through Thursday in the last week of August.

Course Selection for Entering PhD Students

This page provides information about planning for and selecting your first year courses. You should also consult your faculty mentor, who will be assigned to you sometime during the summer. While it's worth thinking about what you will take over the summer, there is no need to formally register for classes until you arrive at Rutgers. Although continuing PhD students should register courses as soon as the registration is open, almost all incoming mathematics Ph.D. students register online during the days just before classes start. Course requirements The requirements for a Ph.D. in Mathematics include successful completion of an approved program consisting of 72 credits, of which at least 24 must be research credits. To be approved, a program should normally include the following five core courses: 640:501 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I (Offered every fall) (Outline of topics) 640:502 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II (Offered every spring) 640:551 Abstract Algebra I (Offered every fall) (Outline of topics) 640:552 Abstract Algebra II (Offered every spring) 640:503 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I (Offered every fall) (Outline of topics) Much of the syllabus of the written qualifying exam comes from 640:501,640:503 and 640:551. Selecting your courses Students are expected to take the three core courses 640:501, 640:503 and 640:551 during their first semester, and the courses 640:502 and 640:552 during their second semester. Exceptions require prior approval from the graduate program director. See below for information about obtaining exemptions from taking core courses. Sometimes an entering student is concerned that he or she may not be ready to take one or more of the core courses. Such students should contact the graduate program director (preferably during the summer) so that we can make an appropriate plan for the student's first semesters here. The normal course load for first year students is three courses for students holding a TA position or having other outside obligations, and three or four courses for students on fellowship. For international students: When you arrive, you will be tested in English, and may be required to take an English course for one or more semesters. Further information about this will come from the international student center and the graduate school. Preparing for the core courses Here are links to information about the preparation expected of students entering 640:501, 640:503 and 640:551. Students are encouraged to review this material in the months before the semester begins. Textbook information for the core courses can be found from the course pages. Exemptions from taking core courses A few entering students have already covered the material from one or more core course in sufficient detail that they may be exempted from taking the course. Students who wish to be granted such an exemption should contact the graduate program director (), explaining the reason for the requested exemption. Normally the reason for requesting an exemption is that you've taken a comparable course elsewhere. In this case, you whould include with your request a syllabus for the course (including textbook, chapters covered and topics covered) as well as the grade received for the course. In evaluating such an exemption, we try to judge not only whether content of the course taken is comparable to the core course, but also that the course was taught at a high enough level. You may be asked to provide some samples of written work (homework and/or exams) when you arrive at Rutgers, so please bring such material with you if you are requesting an exemption. Receiving an exemption from a core course does not give you degree credit towards the 48 credits. To apply for transfer credit for graduate work completed elsewhere, you should consult with the graduate program director sometime during the first semester.

Syllabus of the SPP Algebra Program

To provide an in-depth  review and to fill in gaps in some background material in Abstract Linear Algebra, which is often presumed in standard first year graduate courses. The material to be covered is also part of the syllabus of the qualifying exams on Algebra. Below is a tentative list of topics to be covered; the actural coverage may vary depending on the instructor. Vector spaces, isomorphism, linear transformations: basis, dimension, quotient spaces, direct sums, rank and nullity. Coordinatization. Examples from various places: geometry, linear ODE, quantum mechanics, graph theory, etc. Similarity, eigenvalues, diagonalization, Jordan canonical form, application to ODE's and other areas, Rational canonical form. Role of the ground field (or extended ground field):  In particular applications involving linear operators on vector spaces over the complex field (E.g. Jordan canonical form) Bilinear forms, sesquilinear forms, nondegeneracy, Euclidean and Unitary inner products. Some detailed study of  Hermitian and unitary matrices, in particular, diagonalization involving  Hermitian and unitary matrices. Basic properties of orthogonal and unitary groups. Self-adjoint linear transformations. Duality, esp. finite-dimensional case. Additional topics, if time permits: tensor product defined by naming basis, symmetric and wedge square, higher powers, determinants, Kronecker product, $V^*\otimes W$, differential forms,  Schur duality.  

Syllabus of the SPP Analysis Program

This program aims to provide an in-depth  review and to fill in gaps in some background material in Advanced Calculus expected in standard first year graduate courses. The material to be covered is also part of the syllabus of the qualifying exams on the subjects of  Real Variables and Elementary Point-Set Topology and Complex Variables and Advanced Calculus. Below is a tentative list of topics to be covered; the actual coverage varies depending on instructor. Basic properties of the reals: Limits (including upper and lower limits), Cauchy sequences, completeness, sequential compactness (Bolzano–Weierstrass theorem) and compactness (Heine-Borel Theorem). Basic tools: Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Summation (integration) by parts. Sequences and series of numbers and functions, including absolute and uniform convergence, and equicontinuity. Applications involving power series, integration and differentiation. Basic topological notions such as connectivity, Hausdorff spaces, compactness, product spaces and quotient spaces. Emphasis on  examples in Euclidean and metric spaces. Compactness criteria in metric spaces. Arzelà–Ascoli Theorem and applications. Review of multiple, line and surface integrals, theorems of Green and Stokes and the divergence theorem. Jacobians, implicit and inverse function theorems, and applications. Change of variables formula. Role of exterior calculus.

GUIDELINES ON TIME FOR REVIEW AND ASSESSMENT OF DISSERTATIONS

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS                 The graduate faculty in the Department of Mathematics agrees with the principles in the newly adopted Graduate School-New Brunswick’s GUIDELINES ON TIME FOR REVIEW AND ASSESSMENT OF QUALIFYING PAPERS, THESES AND DISSERTATIONS”: to maintain a culture of mutual respect between students and faculty members and that this include excellent communication among them.  In particular, students must allow sufficient time for faculty members to review and assess their work and faculty members must be as prompt as circumstances allow in responding to their students with such assessments. Further, it is the responsibility of advisors and students to keep committees informed and engaged throughout the process of the student’s research and to ensure that the committee is given adequate time to assess the final product before it is defended. Faculty members on examination committees should indicate their expectations for the timing of their responses. More specifically, (i) the final examination committee of a candidate’s thesis or dissertation should be formed at least three months in advance of the final examination; (ii) members of the examination committee should then be provided with partial drafts of the thesis or dissertation, and a full draft of the thesis or dissertation should be provided at least four weeks before its final examination is scheduled to happen;  (iii) members of the examination committee should inform the candidate of their assessment and begin to provide suggestions for revisions at least two weeks before the scheduled final examination;  and (iv) the revised thesis or dissertation for the final examination should be submitted by the student to the examination committee at least one week before the scheduled examination.  The final examination must be completed at least two weeks before the Graduate School’s deadline for submitting Candidacy Forms to the Graduate School. Advisors should take an active role in making sure that their advisees adhere to the guidelines set above.                 Exceptions may occur. When a degree candidate finds himself or herself in exceptional circumstances, and can not adhere to the guidelines set above, he or she should immediately provide a written appeal for exceptional consideration to the Graduate Program Director, as well as to the advisor and committee members. The Graduate Program Director, in consultation with the advisor and committee members, as well as the Graduate Committee, if needed, will make a determination on whether to grant an exception. When a committee member finds or anticipates himself or herself in exceptional circumstances, and can not adhere to the guidelines set above, he or she should immediately inform the candidate, the Graduate Program Director, the advisor as well as other committee members, and propose alternate arrangements that can help the candidate to complete the final examination within the time frame set by the Program and the Graduate School.                 The guidelines will be posted on the Graduate Program’s websites, will be provided to the candidate and the advisor when the candidate enters into candidacy, and will be distributed to the graduate faculty at its annual meeting for reviewing student progress.

Oral Qualifying Exam Syllabi

Syllabi will be posted after passing orals. In the table below, "TeX" means some dialect of TeX, which can usually be compiled with a plain TeX or LaTeX command. !-- Here's the template for adding new orals syllabi:--> StudentDateTopics Formats Daniela Elizondo June 2024 Stochastic Calculus, Mathematical Finance PDF Scott James June 2024 Several Complex Variables, Riemannian Geometry PDF Kuijun Liu May 2024 Algebraic Topology, Riemann Surface, Riemannian Geometry PDF Ben-Zion Weltsch May 2024 Set Theory, Descriptive Set Theory PDF Anthony Matos April 2024 Elliptic Partial Differential Equations, Riemannian Geometry PDF  Guanhua Shao April 2024 Minimal surfaces, Riemannian Geometry PDF Minhao Bai April 2024 Combinatorics, Complexity Theory PDF Qidong He March 2024 Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics, Probability Theory PDF Wang, Bojue March 2024 Algebraic Geometry, Complex Geometry PDF Brittany Gelb Feb. 2024 Conley Index Theory, Probability Theory PDF Joy Hamlin Feb. 2024 Algebraic Geometry, Symmetric functions PDF Madison Crim Feb. 2024 Lie Algebras, Algebraic Number Theory PDF Donghan Alvis Zhao Jan. 2024 Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations PDF Daniel Tan Dec. 2023 Vertex Operator Algebras, Infinite-dimensional Lie Algebras PDF Lucy Martinez Dec. 2023 Experimental Mathematics, Graph Theory PDF Natalya Ter-Saakov Nov. 2023 Combinatorics and Experimental Mathematics PDF Maxwell Aires Nov. 2023 Combinatorics, Complexity Theory PDF Fanxin Wu Sept 2023 Set Theory, Descriptive Set Theory PDF Ishaan Shah June 2023 Algebraic Geometry, Vertex Operators, and the Chiral De Rham Complex PDF Lawrence Frolov May 2023 Mathematical Physics, Functional Analysis  PDF Weihao Zheng May 2023 Partial Differential Equations, Analysis PDF Kevin Lu May 2023 Geometry, Graph Theory PDF Navin Aksornthong April 2023 Combinatorial Set Theory, Topic in Descriptive Set Theory PDF Hannah Hasan March 2023 Conley Index Theory, Recurrence and Ergodic Theory in Combinatorics PDF Dennis Hou Nov. 2022 Noncommutative Algebra, Abstract Harmonic Analysis PDF Mitchell Bast Oct. 2022 Algebraic Topology, Riemann Surfaces PDF Jishen Du Sept. 2022 Vertex Operator Algebras, Lie Algebras,, Representation Theory PDF Nicholas Backes May 2022 Analytic Number Theory, Modular Forms, Reprepresentation Theory PDF Bernardo Do Prado Rivas May 2022 Dynamical Systems, Algebraic Topology PDF Chen, Hong May 2022 Lie Algebras, Representations of finite groups PDF Shu, Xuanlin May 2022 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF  Dowling, Kenneth Alex May 2022 Conley Index Theory, K-Theory PDF Raghunath, Sriram Feb. 2022 Algebraic Topology, Knot Theory, Riemann surfaces, 4-manifolds and Kirby Calculus PDF Mehlhop, Nathan Nov. 2021 Harmonic Analysis, Hardy-Littlewood Circle Method and Ergodic Theory PDF Daskalakis,Leonidas Nov. 2021 Ergodic Theory, Harmonic Analysis PDF Tarigradschi, Mihail Oct. 2021 Algebraic Geometry, Lie Algebras PDF Kenney, Charles Sept. 2021 Combinatorics, Algorithmic and Additive-Combinatorial NumberAlgorithmic and Additive-Combinatorial NumberTheory PDF Parikh, Aakash Sept. 2021 Algebraic Topology, Conformal Field Theory PDF Shen, Zeyu Sept. 2021 Algebraic Geometry, Homological Algebra PDF Wei, Yuchen Sept. 2021 Symmetric Functions, Lie Algebras PDF Wang, Shaozong July 2021 Partial Differential Equations, Riemannian Geometry & Basics of Minimal Surfaces PDF Chu, Baozhi June 2021 Partial Differential Equations, Riemannian Geometry PDF Khandelwal, Sumeet May 2021 Symplectic Geometry, Riemannian Geometry PDF Sangam, Karuna May 2021 Riemannian Geometry, Algebraic Topology PDF Spahn, George May 2021 Experimental Mathematics, Graph Theory PDF Dougherty-Bliss, Robert May 2021 Experimental Mathematics, Probability Theory PDF Lee, Tae Young April 2021 Representation Theory of Finite Groups, Lie Algebras PDF Seidler, Blair April 2021 Combinatorics, Computational Complexity, Experimental Mathematics, Graph Theory PDF Hernandez_Espiet, Andre April 2021 Analytic Number Theory PDF Han, Zengrui February 2021 Schemes and Cohomology, Complex Algebraic Surfaces PDF Thurman, Forrest  January 2021 Modular Forms, Analytic Number Theory, Number Theory PDF Bu, Alison December 2020  Experimental Mathematics PDF Coelho, Terence December 2020 Affine Lie Algebras and representations PDF Ko, Dongyeong December 2020 Minimal Surface Theory & Riemannian Geometry PDF Goswami, Rashmika November 2020 Combinatorics, Probabilistic Methods, Graph Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Gong, Liuwei November 2020 Partial Differential Equations, Riemannian Geometry PDF Dubroff, Quentin October 2020 Combinatorics, Convex and discrete Geometry PDF Pinsky, Brian September 2020 Set Theory, Topos Theory PDF Mahmoudian, Hamidreza April 2020 Hamilton’s Ricci Flow, Second Order Linear Elliptic and Parabolic PDEs PDF Xu, Weihong January 2020 Schemes, Cohomology Theory of Sheaves, Curves, The Geometry of Flag Varieties, Linear Algebraic Groups PDF Wu, Xiaoxu January 2020 Functional Analysis PDF Ramirez-Ibanez, Cesar February 2020 Topics in Probability on metric spaces, Stochastic Processes, Optimal Transport PDF Martin-Hagemeyer, Rory February 2020 Mean Curvature Flow PDF Lichter, Tamar February 2020 Quadratic Forms over Fields of Characteristic 6= 2 (Major Topic) PDF Herrera, David April 2020 Functional Analysis and Operator Algebras PDF Fonseca, Johnny March 2020 Finite-Dimensional Lie Algebras PDF Davidov, Yael December 2019 Central Simple Algebras and Galois Cohomology, Commutative Algebra PDF Gaudet, Louis December 2019 Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory PDF Kim, Doyon December 2019 Elliptic Curves, Modular forms, Analytic Number Theory PDF Yang, Yuxuan December 2019 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Probabilistic Method, Algebraic Method, Representative Theory PDF Gappo, Takehiko December 2019 Set Theory, Model Theory and Recursion Theory PDF Chanda, Soham November 2019 Algebraic Topology, Symplectic Geometry PDF Zhu, Songhao October 2019 Lie Algebras, Representation Theory PDF Yap, Corrine October 2019 Combinatorics, Combinatorial Group Theory PDF Chayes, Victoria September 2019 Functional Analysis, Topics in Mathematical Physics PDF Holland, James April 2019 Set Theory, Model Theory, Recursion Theory PDF Pham, Doanh The April 2019 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Chen, Xiao March 2019 Mathematical Finance, Stochastic Process PDF Wang, Jikang February 2019 Comparison and Metric Riemannian Geometry, Partial Differential Equation PDF Lee, Heejin February 2019 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Huynh, Andy December 2018 Algebraic Topology, Riemann Surfaces PDF Jones, Edna December 2018 Modular Forms and Ergodic Theory PDF Zhu, Xiaoping November 2018 Algebraic Topology, Riemann Surfaces PDF Karlovitz, Alexander November 2018 Modular Forms, Analytic Number Theory and Ergodic Theory PDF Ogrodnik, Brooke November 2018 Automorphic Forms, Analytic Number Theory PDF Hund, Parker October 2018 PDE, Functional Analysis, Mathematical Physics PDF Saied, Jason October 2018 Finite-dimensional Lie Algebras, Vertex Operator Algebras PDF Zhang, Xindi October 2018 Symplectic Geometry, Algebraic Topology PDF Hauser, George April 2018 Modular Forms, Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory PDF Hohertz, Matthew April 2018 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Complexity Theory, Probabilistic Method PDF Yao, Yukun February 2018 Experimental Mathematics, Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probability Theory PDF Biers-Ariel, Yonah January 2018 Experimental Math, Combinatorics & Graph Theory PDF Semonsen, Justin December 2017 Combinatorics, Probabilistic Methods, Graphy Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Urbanski Wawrzyniak, Chloe November 2017 Several Complex Variables and Harmonic Analysis PDF Lu, Han November 2017 Partial Differential Equation, Riemannian Geometry PDF Chan, Oiloom Vernon November 2017 Algebraic Geometry, Cohomology Theory, Toric Varieties PDF Bang, Jeaheang November 2017 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Wang, Chengxi October 2017 Algebraic Geometry PDF Castronovo, Marco September 2017 Symplectic Topology, Algebraic Geometry PDF Yang, Zhuolun April 2017 Partial Differential Equation, Functional Analysis PDF Yang, Mingjia March 2017 Experimental Math, Combinatorics, Graph Theory PDF Frankston, Keith February 2017 Combinatorics, Graph Theory Symmetric Functions PDF Park, Jinyoung January 2017 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic method, Additive combinatorics PDF Raz, Abigail January 2017 Combinatorics and Graph Theory; Model Theory PDF Ek, Bryan December 2016 Experimental Math, Combinatorics and Graph Theory PDF Flake, Johannes December 2016 Lie Algebras, Vertex Operator Algebras PDF Fu, Xin October 2016 Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, Topics in Mathematical Physics PDF deAmorim, Erik October 2016 Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, Topics in Mathematical Physics PDF Scheinerman, Daniel August 2016 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Cryptography PDF John Chiarelli May 2016 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Suryateja Gavva May 2016 Analytic Number Theory, Automorphic Forms, Sieve methods, Computational Complexity PDF Martin Koberl May 2016 Set Theory, (Basics, Forcing, Inner Model Theory), Model Theory PDF Andrew Lohr April 2016 Combinatorics, Complexity Theory PDF Matthew Welsh April 2016 Analytic Number Theory, Spectral Methods Automorphic Forms, Geometry of Numbers PDF Semen Artamonov March 2016 Noncommutative algebras, representation theory, vertex operator algebras PDF Kelly Spendlove March 2016 Algebraic Topology and Dynamical Systems PDF Samuel Braunfeld February 2016 Logic, Combinatorics PDF Michael Breeling February 2016 Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations PDF Matthew Charnley February 2016 Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations PDF Lun Zhang February 2016 Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, Obstacle and free boundary problems PDF Katie McKeon December 2015 Modular forms, Ergodic Theory, Analytic Number Theory PDF Anthony Zaleski December 2015 Experimental Mathematics, Combinatorics PDF Joel Clingempeel November 2015 Algebraic Topology, Automorphic Forms and Representation Theory PDF Richard Voepel October 2015 Diophantine Analysis, Geometry of Numbers, Transcendental Number Theory PDF William Cole Franks May 2015 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods PDF Rachel Levanger May 2015 Algebraic Topology and Computational Topology Probability PDF Michael Donders March 2015 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Partial Differential Equations PDF Rebecca Coulson March 2015 Mathematical Logic (Model Theory, Basic Set Theory, and Descriptive Set Theory); Combinatorics PDF Alejandro Ginory February 2015 Major Topic: Lie Algebras, Minor: Representation Theory and Symmetric Functions PDF Pedro Pontes December 2014 Sieve Theory, Elliptic Curves, Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory PDF Ruofan Yan November 2014 Major Topic: Math Finance, Minor Topic: Probability and Stochastic Calculus PDF Nathan Fox November 2014 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Hanlong Fang October 2014 Several Complex Variables, Algebraic Surfaces, Elliptic PDE's and Geometry PDF Fei Qi September 2014 Vertex Operator Algebras, Quasideterminants and Non-commutative Symmetric Functions PDF Sijian Tang June 2014 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Siao-Hao Guo May 2014 Mean Curvature Flow and Partial Differential Equations PDF Jonathan Jaquette May 2014 Algebraic Topology & Functional Analysis PDF Sjuvon Chung March 2014 Algebraic Geometry, Homological Algebra PDF Charles Wolf March 2014 Combinatorics, Probabilistic Method, Graphy Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Ross Berkowitz January 2014 Combinatorics, Probabilistic Method, Graphy Theory, Number Theory PDF John Kim January 2014 Combinatorics, Probabilistic Method, Graphy Theory, Probability Theory PDF Nathaniel Shar January 2014 Combinatorics, Probabilistic Method, Graphy Theory, Combinatorial game theory PDF Edmund Karasiewicz December 2013 Algebraic Number Theory, Algebraic Geometry, Linear Algebraic Groups, Elliptic PDF Vladimir Lubyshev December 2013 Stochastic Control and Viscosity Solutions PDF Jiayin Pan December 2013 Topic 1: Comparison & Metric Riemannian Geometry; Topic 2: Symplectic Geometry PDF Douglas Schultz December 2013 Symplectic Geometry (Major), Algebric Topology (Minor) PDF Liming Sun December 2013 Partial Differential Equation and Riemannian Geometry PDF Tien Duy Trinh December 2013 Algebraic Number Theory, Analytic Number Theory, Modular Forms, Elli ptic Curves PDF Zhuohui Zhang December 2013 Algebraic Geometry, Elliptic Curves, Analytic Number Theory, Modular Forms PDF Bence Borda November 2013 Discrete Mathematics and Probality Theory PDF Patrick Devlin October 2013 Combinatorics (enumerative, graph theory, probability methods, experimental Math), Probability PDF Francis Seuffert August 2013 Functional Analysis & PDE's PDF Jake Baron January 2013 Combinatorics, Probalistic Methods, Graph Theory, Foundations PDF Bud Coulson December 2012 Vertex Operator Algebras, Descriptive Set Theory PDF Charles Wes Cowan December 2012 Probability and Stochastic Processes, Controleed Markov Processes and Optimization PDF Katy Crow Craig November 2012 Functional Analysis and C* Algebras, Partial Differential Equations PDF Bin Guo December 2012 Complex Geometry, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations, Evans-Krylov Theorem for Monge-Ampere Equations, Poincare-Lelong Formula PDF Burak Kaya December 2012 Set Theory, Recursion Theory PDF Manuel Larenas March 2013 Functional Analysis, C*-Algebras PDF Timothy Naumovitz December 2012 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Matthew Russell May 2013 Enumerative Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Hypergeometric Functions PDF Thomas Sznigir March 2013 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Glen Wilson December 2012 Algebraic Topology and Cobordism Theory, Homological Algebra and Category Theory PDF Jianguo Xiao March 2013 Functional Analysis, Probability Theory PDF Xukai Yan February 2013 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Howard Nuer May 2012 Algebraic Geometry, Chronological Methods in Algebraic Geometry, Intersection Theory, Complex Algebraic Surfaces PDF Justin Gilmer April 2012 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods, Boolean Functions PDF Brian Garnett September 2012 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods, Probability Theory PDF Edward Chien April 2012 Algebraic and Differential Topology, Gauge Theory, Symplectic Geometry PDF Ming Xiao March 2012 Complex Analysis in Several Complex Variables, Riemannian and Complex Geometry PDF Moulik Kallupalam Balasubramanian March 2012 Non-linear Wave Equation, Functional Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, Geometry and Mathematical Physics PDF Zhan Li February 2012 Algebraic Geometry, Homological Algebra, Toric Varieties PDF John Miller December 2011 Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory, Modular Forms PDF Simao Herdade December 2011 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probablistic Method, Additive and COmbinatorial Number Theory PDF Matthew Samuel October 2011 Algebraic Combinatorics, Algebraic Geometry PDF Shashank Kanade July 2011 Vertex Operator Algebras, Lie Algebras PDF Kellen Myers April 2011 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Analytic and Additive Methods PDF Arran Hamm April 2011 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods, Probability Theory PDF Zahra Aminzare April 2011 Dynamical Models in Biology, Numerical Analysis PDF Christopher Sadowski March 2011 Vertex Operator Algebras, Lie Algebras PDF Priyam Patel March 2011 Algebraic Topology, Riemann Surfaces, Riemannian Geometry PDF Ping Lu March 2011 Numerical Analysis, Partial Differential Equations PDF Knight Fu March 2011 Algebraic Geometry, Homological Algebra PDF Jaret Flores March 2011 Commutative Algebra, Homological Algebra PDF Francesco Fiordalisi March 2011 Vertex Operator Algebras, Kac-Moody Algebras PDF Ved Datar March 2011 Complex Geometry, Complex Analysis in Several Variables, Harnack Inequality PDF Robert DeMarco December 2010 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods, Additive Combinatorics PDF Jorge Cantillo March 2010 Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory, Modular Forms, Elliptic Curves PDF Brandon Bate March 2010 Algebraic Number Theory, Elliptic Curves, Analytic Number Theory, Modular Forms PDF Thomas Tyrrell February 2010 Elliptic Curves and Algebraic Geometry, Algebraic Number Theory and Modular Forms PDF Vidit Nanda February 2010 Topological Degree Theory, Lie Algebras PDF Michael Marcondes de Freitas February 2010 Ordinary Differential Systems and Monotone Systems, Mathematical Biology PDF Ali Maalaoui February 2010 Topological Methods in Critical Point Theory, Morse Theory PDF David Duncan January 2010 Differential Geometry, Functional Analysis PDF Jinwei Yang December 2009 Vertex Operator Algebras, Group Theory PDF Hui Wang December 2009 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Yusra Naqvi December 2009 Lie Algebras, Trees and Group Actions PDF Brian Nakamura December 2009 Enumerative Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Hypergeometric Functions PDF Robert McRae December 2009 Vertex Operator Algebras, Lie Algebras PDF Susan Durst December 2009 Noncommutative Localization, Representation Theory PDF James Dibble December 2009 Differential and Riemannian Geometry, Algebraic Topology PDF Susovan Pal October 2009 Riemannian Geometry, Riemann Surfaces PDF Hernan Castro October 2009 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Jay Williams September 2009 Set Theory, Recursion Theory PDF Camelia Pop September 2009 Probability, Partial Differential Equations, Mathematical Finance PDF Tian Yang May 2009 Algebraic and Differential Topology, Riemannian Geometry PDF Ke Wang April 2009 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabalistic Methods, Probability Theory PDF Yunpeng Wang April 2009 Partial Differential Equations, Riemannian Geometry PDF Humberto Montalvan-Gamez April 2009 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods, Diophantine Approximations PDF Justin Bush April 2009 Algebraic Topology, Probablility and Martingales PDF Brent Young February 2009 Matematical Physics, Classical PDE's of Mathematical Physics PDF Yu Wang February 2009 Partial Differential Equations, Numerical Solutions for PDEs PDF Elizabeth Kupin February 2009 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probabilistic Methods, Probability Theory PDF Emilie Hogan February 2009 Enumerative Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Hypergeometric Functions PDF Vijay Ravikumar January 2009 Algebraic Geometry, Algebraic Topology PDF Sushmita Venugopalan November 2008 Symplectic Geometry, Algebraic Topology PDF Tianling Jin October 2008 Partial Differential Equations, Function Analysis PDF Gabriel Bouch September 2008 Analysis, Riemannian Geometry PDF Andrew Baxter January 2008 Enumerative Combinatorics, Algebraic Topology PDF Hoi Nguyen December 2007 Arithmetic Combinatorics, Discrete Mathematics PDF Sara Blight September 2007 Modular Forms, Elliptic Curves, Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory PDF Dan Staley May 2007 Algebraic and Geometric Topology, Algebraic Geometry PDF Kevin Costello May 2007 Probabilistic Methods, Littlewood-Offord Problems, Prior Work on Random Matricies PDF Wesley Pegden April 2007 Graph Theory, Ramsey Theory, Graphs and Groups and Combinatorial Game Theory PDF Nicholas Trainor April 2007 Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations and Numerical Analysis PDF Padmini Mukkamala February 2007 Combinatorics, Graph Theory and the Probabilistic Method and Discrete and Computational Geometry PDF Paul Raff February 2007 Combinatorics and Graph Theory and Computational Complexity Theory and Algorithm Analysis PDF Amit Priyadarshi December 2006 Fractal Sets and Demensions and Linear Operator Theory PDF Linh Tran December 2006 Combinatorics and Graph Theory and Probabilistic Methods and Additive Number Theory PDF Debajyoti Nandi November 2006 Lie Algebras and Their Representations and Hopf Algebras PDF Reza Rezazadegan November 2006 Symplectic Geometry and Algebraic Topology PDF Yuan Yuan November 2006 Several Complex Variables and Riemannian Geometry PDF Eduardo Osorio September 2006 Stochastic Calculus and Mathematical Finance and PDE's PDF Catherine Pfaff September 2006 Manifolds and Morse Theory and Coarse Geometry PDF Nan Li September 2006 Riemannian Geometry and Algebraic Topology PDF Phillip Matchett Wood September 2006 Combinatorics, Graph Theory and The Probabilistic Method PDF Ming Shi April, 2006 Stochastic Calculus and Mathematical Finance and Numerical Analysis PDF Jawon Koo April, 2006 Financial Mathematics and PDE's PDF Jin Wang April, 2006 Mathematical Finance and PDE's PDF Goran Djankovic April, 2006 Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory PDF Luc Nguyen April, 2006 PDE's and Riemannian Geometry PDF Mike Neiman March, 2006 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Probability Theory and Probabilistic Methods PDF Eric Rowland March 2006 Experimental Mathematics and Diophantine Approximation PDF Colleen Duffy March 2006 Noncommutative Algebra and Hopf Algebras PDF Lara Pudwell February 2006 Combinatorics and Experimental Mathematics PDF Yuan Zhang February 2006 Several Complex Variables and PDE's PDF John Bryk January 2006 Analytic Number Theory & Algebraic Number Theory PDF Tom Robinson January 2006 Vertex Operator Algebras and Lie Algebras PDF ThotsapornThonataponanda December 2005 Enumerative Combinatorics, Special Functions and Graph Theory PDF Ian Levitt December 2005 Combinatorics, Graph Theory & Probabilistic Method, Discrete Optimization PDF Scott Schneider November 2005 Descriptive Set Theory, Classical Groups PDF Ren Guo November 2005 Algebraic Topology and Riemannian Geometry PDF Biao Yin October 2005 Elliptic PDE's and Riemannian Geometry PDF Jared Speck September 2005 Fourier Analysis, Mathematical Physics and PDE's PDF Ben Bunting June 2005 Partial Differential Equations and Functional Analysis PDF Samuel Coskey May 2005 Set Theory and Ergodic Theory PDF Paul Ellis May 2005 Set Theory and Classical Groups Word Pablo Angulo April 2005 Elliptic PDE's and Differential Topology PDF Sarah Genoway April 2005 Commutative Algebra and Computational Geometry PDF Chris Stucchio March 2005 Asymptotics and Semilinear Schrödinger Equations PDF Brian Manning February 2005 Riemannian Geometry, Algebraic Topology PDF ShiTing Bao February 2005 PDE's and Functional Analysis PDF Sujith Vijay November 2004 Combinatorial Number Theory, Diophantine Approximations, Combinatorial Game Theory PDF Sikimeti Mau October 2004 Lie Groups, Functional Analysis PDF Liming Wang April 2004 Mathematical Biology, PDE's PDF Vince Vatter March 2004 Combinatorics, Graph Theory, Probability PDF Mohamud Mohammed December 2003 Experimental Mathematics, Combinatorics and Graph Theory PDF Jason Tedor December, 2003 Complex Analysis, Harmonic Analysis PDF Brian Lins December, 2003 Functional Analysis, Harmonic Analysis PDF Thuy Pham December, 2003 Commutative Algebra, Homological Algebra PDF Ben Kennedy December, 2003 Functional Analysis, Riemannian Geometry   Roman Holowinsky October 2003 Analytic and Algebraic Number Theory PDF Satadal Ganguly September 2003 Analytic and Algebraic Number Theory PDF William Cuckler September 2003 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Probability Theory PDF Andrei Zherebtsov June 2003 Partial Differential Equations, Functional Analysis PDF Alex Zarechnak May 2003 Bohmian Mechanics, Differential Geometry PDF Corina Calinescu May 2003 Vertex Operator Algebras, Kac-Moody Algebras PDF Zhixiang Wang April 2003 Vertex Operator Algebras, Riemannian Geometry PDF Qinian Jin February 2003 Elliptic PDE's, Riemannian Geometry PDF Fernando Louro December 2002 Control Theory, Asymptotics PDF German Enciso December 2002 Harmonic Analysis, Numerical Solutions of PDE's PDF Haoyuan Xu November 2002 Functional Analysis, PDE's PDF Nicolas Weininger September 2002 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Computational Complexity PDF Laura Ciobanu February 2002 Combinatorial Group Theory, Computational Group Theory PDF Pieter Blue February 2002 Functional Analysis, Differential Geometry PDF Michael Weingart February 2002 Representation Theory, Lie Algebras PDF Derek Hansen January 2002 Functional Analysis, Sobolev Spaces, Second Order Elliptic PDE's PDF Aaron Lauve January 2002 Noncommutative Rings, Hopf Algebras PDF Liang Kong December 2001 Vertex Operator Algebras, Quantum Field Theory PDF Stephen Hartke December 2001 Graph Theory and Combinatorics, Discrete Optimization PDF Eva Curry December 2001 Harmonic Analysis and Wavelets, Probability Theory PDF Sasa Radomirovic December 2001 Algebraic Number Theory, Elliptic Curves, Modular Forms, Automorphic Forms PDF Klay Kruczek November 2001 Combinatorics, Graph Theory PDF Kia Dalili October 2001 Algebraic Topology, Commutative Algebra PDF Matthew Young October 2001 Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory, Elliptic Curves, Modular Forms, Elliptic Functions PDF Jeffrey Burdges October 2001 Stability Theory, Algebraic Geometry PDF Raju Chelluri September 2001 Algebraic Number Theory, Analytic Number Theory, Elliptic Curves, Modular Forms PDF Augusto Ponce September 2001 Linear Second Order Elliptic PDE's, The Semilinear Dirichlet Problem PDF Kai Medville May 2001 Functional Analysis, Sobolev Spaces, Laplace's Equation, Second Order Elliptic Equations PDF Jooyoun Hong May 2001 Commutative Algebra, Homological Algebra and Gröbner Bases PDF Liangyi Zhao April 2001 Analytic Number Theory, Algebraic Number Theory, Modular Forms, Elliptic Curves PDF Waldeck Schültzer April 2001 The Littlewood-Richardson Rule, Weyl Character Formula, Theory of Symmetric Functions, Lie Algebras and Representation Theory PDF Richard Mikula April 2001 Linear Functional Analysis, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations PDF Yongzhong Xu December 2000 Partial Differential Equations, Algebraic Topology PDF Eric Sundberg December 2000 Combinatorics and Graph Theory, Probability PDF David Nacin December 2000 Lie Algebras and Representations, The Automorphism Tower Problem PDF Carlo Mazza December 2000 Homological Algebra, Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry PDF James Taylor December 2000 Functional Analysis, Differential Geometry PDF David Radnell June 2000 Vertex Operator Algebras, Functional Analysis PDF Yuka Umemoto March 2000 Algebraic Topology, Differential Geometry PDF Madalena Chaves January 2000 Control Theory, Numerical Analysis PDF James,Scott Oral Syllabus

Short-Term Reading Courses for Ph.D. Students

The following faculty members have expressed interest in supervising graduate students over a duration of a short informal reading course. The suggested format for the course consists of once-a-week hour-long meetings over several weeks to discuss papers/books in the area of mutual interest. The courses are informal, and no grades or credit are given. Students and faculty can deviate from the suggested format depending on their preferences/schedules. This list will be updated as more information becomes available. Faculty members not listed here may also be open to interacting with graduate students in a reading course format and/or as PhD advisors. Anders Buch, algebraic geometry, Schubert calculus, combinatoricsDetailed descriptionweb page Fioralba Cakoni, inverse problems, PDEs, integral equations, inverse scattering theoryDetailed descriptionweb page Lisa Carbone, geometric group theory, Kac-Moody groups, applications to high-energy physicsweb page Eric Carlen, functional analysis, probability, mathematical physicsweb page Sagun Chanillo, classical analysis, PDEsDetailed descriptionemail: Paul Feehan, Geometric analysis, elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations, geometric flows, gauge theory and applications to low-dimensional topology.web pagecourse description Kristen Hendricks, Knot theory, low-dimensional topology, symplectic topologyemail: Xiaojun Huang, complex geometryReading course on complex analysis of several variablesweb pageemail:huangx@math Yi-Zhi Huang, mathematical quantum field theory and its applications in algebra, representation theory, topology and geometryweb pageemail:yzhuang@math Michael Kiessling, mathematical physics: relativistic N-body problems; Maxwell-, Einstein-, and Dirac-equationsweb pageemail:miki@math Daniel Ketover, geometric analysis, minimal surfaces.email: Alex Kontorovich, number theoryweb page Dennis Kriventsov, elliptic PDE, free boundaries, shape optimizationemail: Kasper Larsen, topics in math-financeemail: page Joel Lebowitz, Statistical Mechanics of Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Systems: From the Microscopic to the Macroscopic.email: Jim Lepowsky, vertex operator algebra theoryemail: Feng Luo, Geometry and topology. I have also worked on computer graphics and computer networking recently.web page Yanyan Li, PDEs, Geometric AnalysisCourse 1: Vorticity and incompressible flow.Material:  Chapter 1-3 of the book[MB]  A.J. Majda and A. Bertozzi, Vorticity and incompressible flow.Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics, 27.Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2002.Course 2: A fully nonlinear version of the Yamabe problem.Material: A selection of 1-3 papers.web page Konstantin Mischaikow, nonlinear dynamics, computational topology, topological data analysis and computer assisted proofs in dynamicsweb pageDetailed description Fall 2019: Our group has regular meetings Tuesday 4:00-6:00 pm. Bhargav Narayanan, combinatoricsSpectral methods in discrete mathematicsweb page Vladimir Retakh, noncommutative algebra and related topicsweb page Xiaochun Rong, metric Riemannian geometryemail:rong@math Siddhartha Sahi, representation theoryThe content of the course(s) will of course depend on the background and interests of the student(s).web page Natasa Sesum, Geometric analysis, mean curvature flow, Ricci flowemail:natasas@math Avraham Soffer, mathematical physics, in particular PDEs of math-phys.Spectral and scattering theory for linear and nonlinear waves, math problems in Quantum mechanics, and related topics in Functional Analysis.Google scholar, preprint archiveemail:soffer@math Hongbin Sun, low dimensional topology and hyperbolic geometryThe content of the course depends on the interest of the student.web pageemail: Simon Thomas, mathematical logic: set theory and group theoryweb page Pham Huu Tiep, representation theory, group theoryweb page Li-Cheng Tsai, stochastic analysis and large deviations of interacting particle systems and PDEs.Detailed descriptionweb page Michael Vogelius, Inverse problems and related analysis of Partial Differential Equations. Electromagnetic imaging, meta-materials and invisibility cloaks.web page Charles Weibel,algebraic geometry (via Hartshorne),vector bundles and characteristic classes,Quillen model categories,infinity categoriesweb page Kim Weston, mathematical finance and stochastic analysisDetailed descriptionemail:kimberly.weston@gmail Chris Woodward, symplectic geometryweb page

Master's Degree Essays and Theses

  Master's Theses  NameDate Advisor PDF  Dennis Hou  May 2021  James Lepowsky  PDF                        

Erdős Institute

The Erdős Institute is a multi-university collaboration focused on helping PhDs get jobs they love at every stage of their career. Founded in 2017, the Institute helps train and place a diverse pool of graduate students, postdocs, and graduate alumni. Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences is an academic member institution; all SAS graduate students, postdocs, and graduate alumni have free access to all of the programming and resources that the Institute provides. Examples include the "Invitation to Industry" seminar series, Data Science Bootcamps, Alumni-Led Mini-Courses, Interview Prep Workshops, and Career Coaching. Please visit https://www.erdosinstitute.org/ to enroll.

Reynolds, Guy

Research Centers

Centers with Contacts in the Mathematics Department

Research by Area

The research within the graduate faculty of mathematics spans a wide range of areas of mathematics including:  Algebra and Algebraic Geometry Applied Analysis (Including Mathematical Biology, Mathematical Finance, Numerical Analysis, Control Theory) Geometry and Topology Discrete Mathematics Lie Theory and Representation Theory Logic Mathematical Physics Nonlinear Analysis Number Theory and Algebraic Geometry Partial Differential Equations ALGEBRA AND ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY Algebra and algebraic geometry have always been strongly represented in the Department of Mathematics. Faculty members with active interests in these areas include:Lev Borisov (algebraic geometry) Anders Buch (algebraic geometry, Schubert calculus, combinatorics)Lisa Carbone (geometric group theory, Kac-Moody groups, applications to high-energy physics)Yi-Zhi Huang (representation theory of vertex operator algebras, conformal field theory and connections with geometry and topology)James Lepowsky vertex operator algebra theory, conformal field theory, Lie theory and representation theory, mathematics related to string theoryVladimir Retakh (noncommutative algebra, algebraic aspects of analysis)Siddhartha Sahi (representation theory, harmonic analysis, algebraic combinatorics)Dima Sinapova (Mathematical Logic and Set Theory)Pham Huu Tiep (group theory, representation theory)Charles Weibel (algebraic K-theory, algebraic geometry and homological algebra) Other areas of faculty research with roots in or connections to algebra include Discrete Mathematics, Lie Theory and Representation Theory, Logic, Number Theory. These areas offer numerous graduate courses and support various weekly seminars.There are typically three to five graduate courses in algebra and algebraic geometry each semester (and additional courses in related fields such as number theory.) Various seminars in algebra and related areas are held regularly. APPLIED ANALYSIS A number of mathematics graduate faculty members work in the general area of applied analysis, with applications in a diverse set of fields including mechanics and materials science, biology, and finance:Fioralba Cakoni Inverse Problems, PDEs, Integral Equations, Inverse Scattering TheoryPaul Feehan (Nonlinear elliptic and parabolic PDE, geometric analysis, mathematical physics, probability theory)Kasper Larsen (Math Finance) Liping Liu (Mechanics and Mathematics of Materials)Konstantin Mischaikow (Dynamical systems, mathematical biology, computational topology)Michael Vogelius (Numerical Analysis, partial differential equations)Kimberly Weston (Mathematical finance, stochastic analysis)Ian Tobasco (Calculus of Variations, Partial Differential Equations, Mathematical Materials Science, Elasticity Theory)Faculty in this group participate in various interdisciplinary centers: SYCON(the Rutgers Center for Systems and Control), BioMaPS (Institute for Quantitative Biology), and IAMD (the Institute for Advanced Materials and Devices). GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY The department has several faculty members working in a variety of areas of geometry and topology.Paul Feehan (Nonlinear elliptic and parabolic PDE, geometric analysis, mathematical physics, probability theory)Kristen Hendricks (Low-dimensional topology, symplectic topology, knot theory)Xiaojun Huang (Complex Geometry)Daniel Ketover (Geometric Analysis)Alex Kontorovich (Automorphic Forms and Representations, Homogeneous Dynamics, Harmonic Analysis and Spectral Theory)Chi Li ( Complex Geometry)Feng Luo (Low dimensional topology, geometric structures on manifolds),Xiaochun Rong (Riemannian geometry), Natasa Sesum (Geometric flows),Jian Song (Geometric analysis)Hongbin Sun (Low-dimensional topology and hyperbolic geometry)Charles Weibel (Algebraic topology, K-theory), Chris Woodward (Symplectic geometry, moduli spaces, Lie groups).Guangbo Xu (Symplectic geometry, gauge theory).   Rutgers has a diverse group of faculty in topology/geometry covering many different areas. The group interacts with a variety of other faculty including Sagun Chanillo, Zheng-Chao Han, and YanYan Li. Other faculty working in Analysis, Maxime Van de Moortel, has strong interests in Geometric Analysis and Lorentzian Geometry. Members of the New Brunswick graduate faculty on other Rutgers campuses include: Harold Jacobowitz (Differential geometry), Lee Mosher (CR geometry), John Randall (Low dimensional topology and geometry, geometric group theory) Gabor Toth (differential geometry). Each year, the department offers several graduate courses in these areas and various. In addition, two D'Atri lectures are given each year by an eminent geometer.  DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Discrete mathematics is a rapidly growing branch of modern mathematics, which includes such fields as combinatorics, graph theory, and operations research. It is at the heart of many recent applications of mathematics which relate to computer science, engineering, communications, transportation, decision making by industry and government, and problems of the social, biological, and environmental sciences.The Department of Mathematics at Rutgers University has a substantial group in discrete mathematics.Swee Hong Chan (Enumerative and Algebraic Combinatorics, Discrete Probability, Order Theory)Jeffry N. Kahn (discrete mathematics) János Komlós (discrete mathematics, probability)Bhargav Narayanan (Combinatorics, Probability Theory, Combinatorial Models in Statistical Physics)Fred Roberts (discrete mathematical models of social, environmental, and biological problems, graph theory, decision making, measurement theory) Michael Saks (theory of computation, discrete algorithms) Doron Zeilberger (algebraic and enumerative combinatorics, experimental mathematics). The group is augmented by faculty in the Computer Science Department, including  Mario Szegedy (Quantum computing, computational complexity and combinatorics) and Sepehr Assadi (Computational complexity and algorithms). Other faculty working in algebra, number theory, including Anders Buch, Alex Kontorovich, James Lepowsky, Mariusz Mirek, Vladimir Retakh, and Siddhartha Sahi  have interests related to combinatorics.Rutgers is also the principal site for DIMACS, the center for discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science, which has many visitors and holds numerous workshops each year.There are various regularly scheduled seminars in discrete mathematics and related areas. During Fall 2021, there was a weekly Discrete Math Seminar, an Experimental Mathematics Seminar, and Theory of Computing Reading Group in the mathematics department, and a Theoretical Computer Science seminar in the Computer Science Department.   In a typical  year, the graduate program typically offers a full year course sequence in Combinatorics, an introductory graph theory course, the Experimental Mathematics course, and one or two selected topics courses. Various courses of interest to discrete mathematics students are offered by the Computer Science Department.  LIE THEORY AND REPRESENTATION THEORY The structure and representation theories of Lie algebras and of Lie groups, and natural analogues and generalizations, are very active areas of research. They include the theory of finite-dimensional and infinite-dimensional Lie algebras and Lie groups as well as vertex operator algebra theory and the theory of quantum groups. They have important connections with many other fields, both classical and modern, including algebraic groups, finite groups, geometry, harmonic analysis, differential equations, topology, number theory, combinatorics, and string theory and conformal field theory in theoretical physics. Faculty members at Rutgers working in these research areas include:Lisa Carbone (geometric group theory, Kac-Moody groups, applications to high-energy physics)Yi-Zhi Huang (representation theory of vertex operator algebras, conformal field theory and connections with geometry and topology) Alex Kontorovich (Automorphic Forms and Representations, Homogeneous Dynamics, Harmonic Analysis and Spectral Theory)James Lepowsky (vertex operator algebra theory, conformal field theory, Lie theory and representation theory, mathematics related to string theory)Konstantin Matveev (Asymptotic Representation Theory, Algebraic Combinatorics, Probability Theory)Stephen Miller (automorphic forms, L-functions) Vladimir Retakh (noncommutative Lie theory)Siddhartha Sahi (representation theory, harmonic analysis, algebraic combinatorics)Pham Huu Tiep (group theory, representation theory) Members of the New Brunswick graduate faculty on other Rutgers campuses include Haisheng Li, who works in vertex operator algebra theory. In addition, several other faculty members at Rutgers work in directions that have important interactions with Lie theory.Students usually begin the study of the theory of Lie algebras, Lie groups and their representations by taking frequently offered introductory graduate courses. Most instruction after that is by further courses, seminars and directed reading, in areas that might involve algebra, analysis, geometry, topology, combinatorics and/or physics, depending on the student's interests. Quite a number of students have received Ph.D.s for work in Lie theory and related fields over a period of many years, and many advanced students are currently working in these areas. Several ongoing seminars are devoted to the discussion of recent research in a wide range of areas related to Lie theory and representation theory. Seminar talks are presented by Rutgers faculty and students and by outside speakers. The Rutgers Physics Department has a very strong research group in areas related to string theory and conformal field theory. Advanced students sometimes attend courses and seminars in the Physics Department, as well as seminars at nearby institutions including the Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton University. LOGIC Rutgers has a small but very strong group in logic:Filippo Calderoni (Mathematical Logic, Descriptive Set Theory, and Infinite Group Theory)Saharon Shelah (model theory and set theory)Dima Sinapova (Mathematical Logic and Set Theory)Simon Thomas (set theory and group theory) There are typically one or two graduate courses in logic each year. There is a lively weekly Logic Seminar. Rutgers also hosts the September meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Mathematical Logical Seminar(MAMLS). Faculty and graduate students frequently attend the CUNY Logic Workshop in Manhattan. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS The Mathematical Physics group at Rutgers University includes:Tadeusz Balaban (Mathematical physics) Eric Carlen (Functional analysis, probability, mathematical physics) Ian Jauslin (mathematical physics, more specifically in statistical mechanics, both classical and quantum, and in one- and many-body quantum mechanics)Gerald Goldin (infinite dimensional Lie groups and quantum theory) Sheldon Goldstein (statistical mechanics, probability theory, foundations of quantum mechanics) Michael Kiessling (mathematical physics, statistical mechanics, nonlinear partial differential equations) Joel L. Lebowitz (statistical mechanics, material science, dynamical systems) Bhargav Narayanan (Combinatorics, Probability Theory, Combinatorial Models in Statistical Physics)David Ruelle (statistical mechanics; dynamical systems) Avraham Soffer (partial differential equations, scattering theory) Eugene Speer (statistical mechanics, quantum field theory)Ian Tobasco (Calculus of Variations, Partial Differential Equations, Mathematical Materials Science, Elasticity Theory)Maxime Van de Moortel (General Relativity, Hyperbolic PDE's)This group interacts strongly with the analysis group, Lie Theory group, and with members of the Physics Department interested in statistical mechanics, condensed matter physics, and theoretical high energy physics. (G. Goldin, S. Goldstein and J. Lebowitz have joint appointments in the Physics Department).The group is augmented by a large number of post-docs and visitors. It conducts a weekly seminars and a widely attended semi-annual conferences in Statistical Mechanics. There are also weekly condensed matter and high energy seminars, and the departmental colloquia in mathematics and physics are often related to mathematical physics.The relationship between faculty and students is informal and pleasant with frequent joint lunches; in particular the weekly mathematical physics seminar is followed by a brown bag lunch at which there is much informal discussion of all kinds of problems - both scientific and non-scientific. NONLINEAR ANALYSIS Faculty working in nonlinear analysis include: Haim Brezis (Nonlinear analysis; PDE) Sagun Chanillo (Classical analysis, PDE)Zheng-Chao Han (Nonlinear analysis, PDE)Denis Kriventsov (elliptic and parabolic equations, free boundary problems.) Yanyan Li (Nonlinear analysis, PDE)Mariusz Mirek (harmonic analysis, ergodic theory and probability theory)Ian Tobasco (Calculus of Variations, Partial Differential Equations, Mathematical Materials Science, Elasticity Theory)Maxime Van de Moortel (General Relativity, Hyperbolic PDE's) Nonlinear functional analysis comprises a body of techniques which have been developed since the early 1900's in order to study various nonlinear equations from analysis, geometry, physics and applied mathematics. Typically, these techniques have had a strong functional analytic flavor, but ideas from many other parts of mathematics (notably algebraic and differential topology) have played an important role. The past twenty-five years have seen a particularly explosive growth of nonlinear functional analysis. A partial list includes such developments as the theories of monotone, A-proper and condensing operators, global theories of bifurcation, new methods for finding critical points of real-valued maps from Banach spaces or Banach manifolds, extensions of the classical Leray-Schauder degree and applications of these ideas to concrete nonlinear problems.The research interests of members of this group include nonlinear functional analysis and its applications to particular problems (e.g., questions about periodic solutions of Hamiltonian systems, existence and qualitative properties of periodic solutions of differential-delay equations, solvability of certain nonlinear boundary value problems from ordinary and partial differential equations, global problems in symplectic geometry, and curvature equations in geometry). The two D'Atri lectures, given each year by an eminent geometer, are sponsored by this group.A general course in nonlinear functional analysis is usually given every other year, while more specialized courses are also offered. Students are strongly encouraged to take courses in ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations, while knowledge of differential topology and algebraic topology is useful. Of course, reading courses for advanced graduate students are also available. The analysis seminar frequently has speakers on nonlinear problems. NUMBER THEORY Faculty members at Rutgers with research interests in number theory include:Jozsef Beck (combinatorics; combinatorial number theory) Henryk Iwaniec (Analytic Number Theory) Stephen Miller (Automorphic forms; L-functions) Alex Kontorovich Automorphic Forms and Representations, Homogeneous Dynamics, Harmonic Analysis and Spectral TheoryResearch interests are varied including the study of analytic, algebraic and combinatorical number theory. The study of automorphic forms is prominent both in its analytic and algebraic aspects, and there is some connection with the faculty members studying Lie groups.Several graduate courses in number theory or algebraic geometry are offered each year. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Specialists in PDE among the faculty include:R. Michael Beals (harmonic analysis, fourier integral operators, PDE) Haim Brezis (nonlinear analysis, PDE) Fioralba Cakoni Inverse Problems, PDEs, Integral Equations, Inverse Scattering TheorySagun Chanillo (Classical analysis, PDE)Paul Feehan (Nonlinear elliptic and parabolic PDE, geometric analysis, mathematical physics, probability theory) Zheng-Chao Han (nonlinear analysis, PDE) Xiaojun Huang (several complex variables)Michael Kiessling (statistical mechanics, nonlinear PDE)Denis Kriventsov (elliptic and parabolic equations, free boundary problems.)                                              Yanyan Li (nonlinear analysis, PDE) Vladimir Scheffer (fluid dynamics, Navier-Stokes equation) Natasa Sesum (Geometric flows; PDE)Avy Soffer (scattering theory, PDE) A. Shadi Tahvildar-Zadeh (nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations) Maxime Van de Moortel (General Relativity, Hyperbolic PDE's)Ian Tobasco (Calculus of Variations, Partial Differential Equations, Mathematical Materials Science, Elasticity Theory)Michael Vogelius (numerical analysis and partial differential equations)As one can see from the list above, research in PDE at Rutgers is extensive. Topics from both linear and nonlinear PDE are included, and research ranges from the study of properties of general classes of equations to work with particular equations that occur in the physical sciences as well as their numerical solution.The graduate curriculum in PDE builds on the standard courses in real, complex, and functional analysis. The introductory course, which is given almost every year, treats such topics as elementary distribution theory, fundamental solutions of the heat, wave, and Laplace equations, the Cauchy problem for linear PDE's, elliptic equations, and Sobolev spaces. In recent years other courses have dealt with distribution theory, pseudodifferential and Fourier integral operators, microlocal analysis, paradifferential operators, measure theoretic methods for variational equations, and nonlinear propagation of singularities. Courses in nonlinear functional analysis and functions of several complex variables are usually offered every other year. Some study of the numerical solution of PDE's is included in the basic one year survey course in numerical analysis given each year. Every other year, a more specialized course is offered on this topic.Graduate students at Rutgers are able to attend courses and seminars at Princeton University, where research in linear PDE and several complex variables is also very active. The Courant Institute of New York University, a leading research center for pure and applied analysis, is about one hour away from the Rutgers campus.

Gelfand Memorial

I. M. Gelfand 1913 – 2009 Memorial – December 6, 2009  Program Written versions of remarks presented at the Memorial  Tatiana V. Gelfand  Casimir Kulikowski  Dusa McDuff Other statements prepared for the Memorial  Yuri I. Arshavsky  Michael Atiyah  E. B. Dynkin  D. B. Fuchs  Roger Howe  Peter Lax  Leonid Margolis  Louis Nirenberg  Nikita Nekrasov  Peter Sarnak  Vera Serganova  Alexander Shen  Alik Wajnberg        Biographical sketch by Simon Gindikin (1991)  Essay on the Moscow Gelfand Seminar by Simon Gindikin (1993)  Remarks by I. M. Singer (1993) Photographs  Portrait from Family, Rutgers Photo (1993), At Blackboard, Portrait 1982 (from collected works) With Kister and Gabrielov, With Reutenauer Link to Israel Moiseevich Gelfand Website (maintained by Tatiana V. Gelfand and Tatiana I. Gelfand)   Though the content referenced heretofore is now hosted by the Mathematics Department, requests for additions to this page should be made to Dr. Robert Wilson.

Dean Jacqueline B. Lewis Memorial Lectures

The 2018 Jacqueline B. Lewis Memorial Lecturer is Camillo De Lellis Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 26th Jacqueline B. Lewis Memorial Lectures Open to the Public – Use Lots 60A or 64 behind Hill Center For a Parking Permit, call 848-445-6991 Dates Wednesday, October 24   |   Thursday, October 25   |   Friday, October 26 Professor Jacqueline B. Lewis was a mathematician and former Dean of Rutgers' University College in New Brunswick who died in 1982 after a career spanning nearly 20 years at Rutgers. She served as an Associate Dean of University College from 1974 to 1978 and as Vice Dean of the school from 1978 to 1981, when she was appointed Dean. She also served as Acting Dean of the Faculty of Professional Studies from June 1981 to September 1982. The lectures were endowed in 1983 by a gift from Dean Lewis' aunt, Lillian Nassau. Previous Lewis Lectures LecturerDateTitle Nolan Wallach October 2015 Basic Geometric Invariant Theory I, IISome Applications of Geometric Invariant Theory Yum-Tong Siu December 2013 The Complex Neumann Problem and Multiplier Ideal Sheaves Methods of Partial Differential Equations in Complex Algebraic Geometry Analytic Methods of Constructing Bundle Sections and their Geometric Applications Jennifer Tour Chayes November 2010 The Mathematics of Dynamic Random Networks Andrei Zelevinsky April 2010* Introduction to Cluster Algebras Cluster Algebras of Finite Type and their Geometric Realizations Quivers with Potentials and Generalized Reflection Functors * – Postponed from 2009 Terence Tao March 2008 Szemerédi's Regularity Lemma Revisited Three Lectures on Discrete Random Matrices:   Singularity and Determinant of Discrete Random Matrices   The Least Singular Value of Discrete Random Matrices   Eigenvalue Distributions of Discrete Random Matrices Andrei Okounkov April 2007 Moduli of Curves and Combinatorics Shmuel Weinberger October 2004 Themes in Quantitative Topology:   Problems and naive examples   Computation, entropy, and variational problems   Embeddings, symmetry, and rigidity Jean-Michel Coron October 2003 Controllability and nonlinearity for some flow control systems Richard P. Stanley October 2002 Six Recent Developments in Algebraic Combinatorics:   The Laurent phenomenon; longest increasing subsequences   The Saturation Conjecture; the n! Conjecture   Gromov-Witten invariants; graphical degree sequences Graeme Segal April 2001 The Mathematical Structure of Quantum Field Theory; Quantum Field Theory and K-Theory; Quantum Field Theory and Representation Theory Yves Meyer March 2000 Wavelets and Image Processing: Theory and Application to Denoising   Hubble Space Telescope Images; Oscillations, Vibrations, Time-Frequency Analysis and the Virgo Program   (Detection of Gravitati onal Waves); The Role of Oscillations in Some Non-Linear Evolution Equations:   Application to Navier-Stokes Equations Don Zagier March 1997 Modular Forms and Differential Operators Alain Connes April 1996 Gravity Coupled with Matter and the Foundation of Noncommutative Geometry Karen Uhlenbeck September 1994 Moduli Spaces of Solutions to PDE V. I. Arnold November 1993 On Some Problems in Singularity Theory Ian Macdonald March 1993 Symmetric Functions and Orthogonal Polynomial L. Craig Evans March 1992 Compactness for Solutions of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations Jurgen Moser March 1991 Stability in Dynamics and Minimal Solutions in the Calculus of Variations Yasha G. Sinai April 1990 Random Behavior of Eigenvalues of Laplacians Paul Rabinowitz April 1989 Periodic Solutions of Hamiltonian Systems H. Blaine Lawson April 1988 Algebraic Cycles David Kazhdan March 1987 Representations of Reductive P-Adic Groups Lipman Bers October 1985 Teichmüller Theory for Beginners G. D. Mostow March 1985 Braids, Hypergeometric Functions, and Lattices Stephen Smale March 1984 The Topology of Classical Algorithms

Memorial for Felix E. Browder

Memorial for Felix E. Browder Flyer

Nonlinear Analysis and PDE Seminar

Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's Spring 2017 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Organizer on Princeton side: Alice Chang }   April 18, 2017, 1:40pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Philip Isett, MIT Title: A Proof of Onsager's Conjecture for the Incompressible Euler Equations Abstract: In an effort to explain how anomalous dissipation of energy occurs in hydrodynamic turbulence, Onsager conjectured in 1949 that weak solutions to the incompressible Euler equations may fail to exhibit conservation of energy if their spatial regularity is below 1/3-Holder. I will discuss a proof of this conjecture that shows that there are nonzero, (1/3-\epsilon)-Holder Euler flows in 3D that have compact support in time. The construction is based on a method known as "convex integration," which has its origins in the work of Nash on isometric embeddings with low codimension and low regularity. A version of this method was first developed for the incompressible Euler equations by De Lellis and Szekelyhidi to build Holder-continuous Euler flows that fail to conserve energy, and was later improved by Isett and by Buckmaster-De Lellis-Szekelyhidi to obtain further partial results towards Onsager's conjecture. The proof of the full conjecture combines convex integration using the "Mikado flows" introduced by Daneri-Szekelyhidi with a new "gluing approximation" technique. The latter technique exploits a special structure in the linearization of the incompressible Euler equations.     April 18, 2017, 3:00pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Matthew J. Gursky, University of Notre Dame Title: Some existence and non-existence results for Poincare-Einstein metrics Abstract: I will begin with a brief overview of the existence question for conformally compact Einstein manifolds with prescribed conformal infinity. After stating the seminal result of Graham-Lee, I will discuss a non-existence result (joint with Qing Han) for certain conformal classes on the 7-dimensional sphere. I will also mention some ongoing work (with Gabor Szekelyhidi) on a version of "local existence" of Poincare-Einstein metrics.   Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Fall 2016 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Organizer on Princeton side: Alice Chang }   October 21, 2016, 2:00pm, Princeton - Fine Hall 224 Speaker: Yanyan Li, Rutgers University Title: Blow up analysis of solutions of conformally invariant fully nonlinear elliptic equations Abstract: We establish blow-up profiles for any blowing-up sequence of solutions of genera l conformally invariant fully nonlinear elliptic equations on Euclidean domains. We prove that (i) the distance between blow-up points is bounded from below by a universal positive number, (ii) the solutions are very close to a single stand ard bubble in a universal positive distance around each blow-up point, and (iii) the heights of these bubbles are comparable by a universal factor. As an applic ation of this result, we establish a quantitative Liouville theorem. This is a joint work with Luc Nguyen.     October 21, 2016, 3:30pm, Princeton - Fine Hall 224 Speaker: Yi Wang, Johns Hopkins University Title: A fully nonlinear Sobolev trace inequality Abstract: The \(k\)-Hessian operator \(sigma_k\) is the \(k\)-th elementary symmetric function of the eigenvalues of the Hessian. It is known that the \(k\)-Hessian equation \(sigma_k(D^2 u)=f\) with Dirichlet boundary condition \(u=0\) is variational; indeed, this problem can be studied by means of the \(k\)-Hessian energy \(int -u sigma_k(D^2 u)\). We construct a natural boundary functional which, when added to the \(k\)-Hessian energy, yields as its critical points solutions of \(k\)-Hessian equations with general non-vanishing boundary data. As a consequence, we prove a sharp Sobolev trace inequality for \(k\)-admissible functions \(u\) which estimates the \(k\)-Hessian energy in terms of the boundary values of \(u\). This is joint work with Jeffrey Case.   Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Spring 2016 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Organizer on Princeton side: Alice Chang }   April 5, 2016, 4:00pm Hill 705 Speaker: Changfeng Gui, University of Connecticut Title: Moser-Trudinger type inequalities, mean field equations and Onsager vortices Abstract: In this talk, I will present a recent work confirming the best constant of a Moser-Trudinger type inequality conjectured by A. Chang and P. Yang. The proof is based on a new and powerful lower bound of total mass for mean field equations. Other applications of the lower bound include the classification of certain Onsager vortices on the sphere, the radially symmetry of solutions to Gaussian curvature equation on the plane, classification of solutions for mean field equations on tori and the sphere, etc. The resolution of several interesting problems in these areas will be presented. The work is jointly done with Amir Moradifam from UC Riverside.     April 5, 2016, 5:15pm, Hill 705 Speaker: Jacob Bernstein, Johns Hopkins University Title: Hypersurfaces of low entropy Abstract: The entropy is a natural geometric quantity introduced by Colding and Minicozzi and may be thought of as a rough measure of the complexity of a hypersurface of Euclidean space. It is closely related to the mean curvature flow. On the one hand, the entropy controls what types of singularities the flow develops. On the other, the flow may be used to study the entropy. In this talk I will survey some recent results with Lu Wang that show that hypersurfaces of low entropy can't be too complicated.   Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Fall 2015 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Organizer on Princeton side: Alice Chang }   Oct. 16, 2015, Friday, 3:00pm, Fine Hall 314, Princeton University Speaker: Andrea Malchiodi, Scuola Normale Superiore Title: Embedded Willmore tori in three-manifolds with small area constraint Abstract: While there are lots of contributions on Willmore surfaces in the three-dimensional Euclidean space, the literature on curved manifolds is still relatively limited. One of the main aspects of the Willmore problem is the loss of compactness under conformal transformations. We construct embedded Willmore tori in manifolds with a small area constraint by analyzing how the Willmore energy under the action of the Mobius group is affected by the curvature of the ambient manifold. The loss of compactness is then taken care of using minimization arguments or Morse theory.     Oct. 16, 2015, Friday, 4:15pm, Fine Hall 314, Princeton University Speaker: Daniela De Silva, Columbia University Title: The two membranes problem Abstract: We will consider the two membranes obstacle problem for two different operators, possibly non-local. In the case when the two operators have different orders, we discuss how to obtain \(C^\) regularity of the solutions. In particular, for two fractional Laplacians of different orders, one obtains optimal regularity and a characterization of the boundary of the coincidence set. This is a joint work with L. Caffarellii and O. Savin.   Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Spring 2015 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Antonio Ache}   May 5, 2015, Tuesday, 4:00pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Gregory Seregin, The University of Oxford Title: Ancient solutions to Navier-Stokes equations Abstract: In the talk, I shall try to explain the relationship between the so-called ancient (backwards) solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations in the space or in a half space and the global well-posedness of initial boundary value problems for these equations. Ancient solutions itself are an interesting part of the the theory of PDE's. Among important questions to ask are classification, smoothness, existence of non-trivial solutions, etc. The latter problem is in fact a Liouville type theory for non-stationary Navier-Stokes equations. The essential part of the talk will be addressed the so-called mild bounded ancient solutions. The Conjecture is that {\it any mild bounded ancient solution is a constant}, which should be identically zero in the case of the half space. The validity of the Conjecture would rule out Type I blowups that have the same kind of singularity as possible self-similar solutions. I am going to list known cases for which the Conjecture has been proven: the Stokes system, the 2D Navier-Stokes system, axially symmetric solutions in the whole space. Very little is known in the case of the half space. Other type of ancients solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations will be mentioned as well.     May 5, 2015, Tuesday, 5:15pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Fernando Marques, Princeton University Title: Multiparameter sweepouts and the existence of minimal hypersurfaces Abstract: It follows from the work of Almgren in the 1960s that the space of unoriented closed hypersurfaces, in a compact Riemannian manifold M, endowed with the flat topology, is weakly homotopically equivalent to the infinite dimensional real projective space. Together with Andre Neves, we have used this nontrivial structure, and previous work of Gromov and Guth on the associated multiparameter sweepouts, to prove the existence of infinitely many smooth embedded closed minimal hypersurfaces in manifolds with positive Ricci curvature and dimension at most 7. This is motivated by a conjecture of Yau (1982). We will discuss this result, the higher dimensional case and current work in progress on the problem of the Morse index.     March 27, 2015, Friday, 3:00pm, Room 314, Fine Hall, Princeton University Speaker: William Minicozzi, MIT Title: Uniqueness of blowups and Lojasiewicz inequalities Abstract: The mean curvature flow (MCF) of any closed hypersurface becomes singular in finite time. Once one knows that singularities occur, one naturally wonders what the singularities are like. For minimal varieties the first answer, by Federer-Fleming in 1959, is that they weakly resemble cones. For MCF, by the combined work of Huisken, Ilmanen, and White, singularities weakly resemble shrinkers. Unfortunately, the simple proofs leave open the possibility that a minimal variety or a MCF looked at under a microscope will resemble one blowup, but under higher magnification, it might (as far as anyone knows) resemble a completely different blowup. Whether this ever happens is perhaps the most fundamental question about singularities. We will discuss the proof of this long standing open question for MCF at all generic singularities and for mean convex MCF at all singularities. This is joint work with Toby Colding.     March 27, 2015, Friday, 4:15pm, Room 314, Fine Hall, Princeton University Speaker: Luis Silvestre, University of Chicago Title: \(C^\) regularity for the parabolic homogeneous p-Laplacian equation Abstract: It is well known that p-harmonic functions are \(C^\) regular, for some \(\alpha>0\). The classical proofs of this fact uses variational methods. In a recent work, Peres and Sheffield construct p-Harmonic functions from the value of a stochastic game. This construction also leads to a parabolic versions of the problem. However, the parabolic equation derived from the stochastic game is not the classical parabolic p-Laplace equation, but a homogeneous version. This equation is not in divergence form and variational methods are inapplicable. We prove that solutions to this equation are also \(C^\) regular in space. This is joint work with Tianling Jin.   Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Fall 2014 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Antonio Ache}   Dec. 4, 2014, Thursday, 4:30pm, Fine 214, Princeton University Speaker: Sigurd Angenent, University of Wisconsin, Madison Title: Mean Curvature Flow of Cones Abstract: For smooth initial hypersurfaces one has short time existence and uniqueness of solutions to Mean Curvature Flow. For general initial data Brakke showed that varifold solutions exist, but that they need not be unique if the initial data are non smooth. In this talk I will discuss the multitude of solutions to MCF that exist if the initial hypersurface is a cone that is smooth except at the origin. Some of the examples go back to older work with Chopp, Ilmanen, and Velazquez, other examples are recent.   Dec. 4, 2014, Thursday, 5:30pm, Fine 214, Princeton University Speaker: John Lott, University of California, Berkeley, Title: Geometry of the space of probability measures Abstract: The space of probability measures, on a compact Riemannian manifold, carries the Wasserstein metric coming from optimal transport. Otto found a remarkable formal Riemannian metric on this infinite-dimensional space. It is a challenge to make rigorous sense of the ensuing formal calculations, within the framework of metric geometry. I will describe what is known about geodesics, curvature, tangent spaces (cones) and parallel transport.   Oct. 8, 2014, Weds., 4:45pm, Hill 705 Speaker: Panagiota Daskalopoulos, Columbia University Title: Ancient solutions to geometric flows Abstract: We will discuss ancient or eternal solutions to geometric parabolic partial differential equations. These are special solutions that appear as blow up limits near a singularity. They often represent models of singularities. We will address the classification of ancient solutions to geometric flows such as the Mean Curvature flow, the Ricci flow and the Yamabe flow, as well as methods of constructing new ancient solutions from the gluing of two or more solitons. We will also include future research directions.   Oct. 8, 2014, Weds., 5:45pm, Hill 705 Speaker: Lan-Hsuan Huang, University of Connecticut Title: Geometry of asymptotically flat graphical hypersurfaces in Euclidean space Abstract: We consider a special class of asymptotically flat manifolds of nonnegative scalar curvature that can be isometrically embedded in Euclidean space as graphical hypersurfaces. In this setting, the scalar curvature equation becomes a fully nonlinear equation with a divergence structure, and we prove that the graph must be weakly mean convex. The arguments use some intriguing relation between the scalar curvature and mean curvature of the graph and the mean curvature of its level sets. Those observations enable one to give a direct proof of the positive mass theorem in this setting in all dimensions, as well as the stability statement that if the ADM masses of a sequence of such graphs approach zero, then the sequence converges to a flat plane in both Federer-Flemings flat topology and Sormani-Wenger's intrinsic flat topology. Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Spring 2014 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Antonio Ache}   April 30, 2014, Weds., 2:00pm, Jadwin A06, Princeton University Speaker: Fanghua Lin, Courant Institute Title: Large N asymptotics of Optimal partitions of Dirichlet eigenvalues Abstract: In this talk, we will discuss the following problem: Given a bounded domain . i n R^n, and a positive energy N, one divides . into N subdomains, .j,j=1,2,...,N. We consider the so-called optimal partitions that give the least possible value for the sum of the first Dirichelet eigenvalues on these sumdomains among all a dmissible partitions of \(\Omega\).   April 30, 2014, Weds., 3:15pm, Jadwin A06, Princeton University Speaker: Bruce Kleiner, Courant Institute Title: Ricci flow through singularities Abstract: It has been a long-standing problem in geometric analysis to find a good definition of generalized solutions to the Ricci flow equation that would formalize the heuristic idea of flowing through singularities. I will discuss a notion in the 3-d case that has good analytical properties, enabling one to prove existence and compactness of solutions, as well as a number of structural results. It may also be used to partly address a question of Perelman concerning the convergence of Ricci flow with surgery to a canonical flow through singularities. This is joint work with John Lott.   March 11, 2014, Tuesday, 4:45pm, Hill 525, Rutgers University Speaker: Peter Constantin, Princeton University Title: Long time behavior of forced 2D SQG equations Abstract: We prove the absence of anomalous dissipation of energy for the forced critical surface quasi-geostrophic equation (SQG) in {\mathbb }^2 and the existence of a compact finite dimensional golbal attractor in {\mathbb T}^2. The absence of anomalous dissipation can be proved for rather rough forces, and employs methods that are suitable for situations when uniform bounds for the dissipation are not available. For the finite dimensionality of the attractor in the space-periodic case, the global regularity of the forced critical SQG equation needs to be revisited, with a new and final proof. We show that the system looses infinite dimensional information, by obtaining strong long time bounds that are independent of initial data. This is joint work with A. Tarfulea and V. Vicol.   March 11, 2014, Tuesday, 5:45pm, Hill 525, Rutgers University Speaker: Mihalis Dafermos, Princeton University Title: The linear stability of the Schwarzschild solution under gravitational perturbations in general relativity Abstract: I will discuss joint work with G. Holzegel and I. Rodnianski showing the linear stability of the celebrated Schwarzschild black hole solution in general relativity. Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Fall 2013 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Luc Nguyen)   Tuesday, Dec. 3, 4:30pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Gaoyong Zhang, Polytechnic Institute of New York University Title: The logarithmic Minkowski problem Abstract: The logarithmic Minkowski problem asks for necessary and sufficient conditions in order that a nonnegative finite Borel measure in (n-1)-dimensional projective space be the cone-volume measure of the unit ball of an n-dimensional Banach spa ce. The solution to this problem is presented. Its relation to conjectured geometric inequalities that are stronger than the classical Brunn-Minkowski inequality will be explained.   Tuesday, Dec. 3, 5:30pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Sergiu Klainerman, Princeton University Title: On the Reality of Black Holes     Friday, Oct. 4, 4:15pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Natasa Sesum, Rutgers University Title: Yamabe flow, its singularity profiles and ancient solutions Abstract: We will discuss conformally flat complete Yamabe flow and show that in some case s we can give the precise description of singularity profiles close to the extin ction time of the solution. We will also talk about a construction of new compac t ancient solutions to the Yamabe flow. This is a joint work with Daskalopoulos, King and Manuel del Pino   Friday, Oct. 4, 3:00pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Jeff Viaclovsky, University of Wisconsin-Madison Title: Critical metrics on connected sums of Einstein four-manifolds Abstract: I will discuss a gluing procedure designed to obtain canonical metrics on connected sums of Einstein four-manifolds. The main application is an existence result, using two well-known Einstein manifolds as building blocks: the Fubini-Study metric on CP^2, and the product metric on S^2 x S^2. Using these metrics in various gluing configurations, critical metrics are found on connected sums for a specific Riemannian functional, which depends on the global geometry of the factors. This is joint work with Matt Gursky. Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Spring 2013 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Luc Nguyen)   Tuesday, April 23, 5:30pm, Hill 425, Rutgers University Speaker: Camillo De Lellis, Zurich Title: Quantitative rigidity estimates Abstract: For many classical rigidity questions in differential geometry it is natural to ask to which extent they are stable. I will review several recent results in the literature. A typical example is the following: there is a constant \(C\) such th at, if \(Sigma\) is a \(2\)-dimensional embedded closed surface in \(R^3\), then \(min_ lambda |A- lambda g|_ leq C |A - g/2|_\), where \(A\) is the se cond fundamental form of the surface and \(g\) the Riemannian metric as a submanif old of \(R^3\).   Tuesday, April 23, 4:30pm, Hill 425, Rutgers University Speaker: Xiaochun Rong, Rutgers University Title: Degenerations of Ricci Flat Kahler Metrics under extremal transitions and flops Abstract: We will discuss degeneration of Ricci-flat Kahler metrics on Calabi-Yau manifold s under algebraic geometric surgeries: extremal transitions or flops. We will pr ove a version of Candelas and de la Ossa's conjecture: Ricci-flat Calabi-Yau man ifolds related via extremal transitions and flops can be connected by a path con sisting of continuous families of Ricci-flat Calabi-Yau manifolds and a compact metric space in the Gromov-Hausdorff topology. This is joint work with Yuguang Zhang   Friday, March 1, 4:00pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Jian Song, Rutgers University Title: Analytic minimal model program with Ricci flow Abstract: I will introduce the analytic minimal model program proposed by Tian and myself to study formation of singularities of the Kahler-Ricci flow. We also construct geometric and analytic surgeries of codimension one and higher codimensions equ ivalent to birational transformations in algebraic geometry by Ricci flow.   Friday, March 1, 3:00pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Antonio Ache, Princeton University Title: On the uniqueness of asymptotic limits of the Ricci flow Abstract: Given a compact Riemannian manifold we consider a solution of a normalization of the Ricci flow which exists for all time and such that both the full curvature tensor and the diameter of the manifold are uniformly bounded along the flow. It was proved by Natasa Sesum that any such solution of the normalized Ricci flow is sequentially convergent to a shrinking gradient Ricci soliton and moreover the limit is independent of the sequence if one assumes that one of the limiting solitons satisfies a certain integrability condition. We prove that this integrability condition can be removed using an idea of Sun and Wang for studying the stability of the Kaehler-Ricci flow near a Kaehler-Einstein metric. The method relies on the monotonicity of Perelman's W-functional along the Ricci flow and a Lojasiewicz-Simon inequality for the mu-functional. If time permits we will compare this result with recent Theorems on the stability of the Ricci flow. Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Fall 2012 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Luc Nguyen)   Thursday, September 13, 5:00pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Jie Qing, University of California, Santa Cruz Title: Hypersurfaces in hyperbolic space and conformal metrics on domains in sphere Abstract: In this talk I will introduce a global correspondence between properly immersed horospherically convex hyper surfaces in hyperbolic space and complete conforma l metrics on subdomains in the boundary at infinity of hyperbolic space. I will discuss when a horospherically convex hypersurface is proper, when its hyperboli c Gauss map is injective, and when it is embedded. These are expected to be usef ul to the understandings of both elliptic problems of Weingarten hypersurfaces i n hyperbolic space and elliptic problems of complete conformal metrics on subdom ains in sphere.   Thursday, September 13, 4:00pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Alessio Figalli, University of Texas, Austin Title: Regularity Results For Optimal Transport Maps Abstract: Knowing whether optimal maps are smooth or not is an important step towards a qualitative understanding of them. In the 90's Caffarelli developed a regularity theory on R^n for the quadratic cost, which was then extended by Ma-Trudinger-Wang and Loeper to general cost functions which satisfy a suitable structural condition. Unfortunately, this condition is very restrictive, and when considered on Riemannian manifolds with the cost given by the squared distance, it is satisfied only in very particular cases. Hence the need to develop a partial regularity theory: is it true that optimal maps are always smooth outside a "small" singular set? The aim of this talk is to first review the "classical" regularity theory for optimal maps, and then describe some recent results about their partial regularity. Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Spring 2012 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Luc Nguyen)   Monday, April 30, 4:30-6:30pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Andre Neves, Imperial College Title: Min-max theory and the Willmore Conjecture Abstract: In 1965, T. J. Willmore conjectured that the integral of the square of the mean curvature of any torus immersed in Euclidean three-space is at least 2 pi^2. I w ill talk about my recent joint work with Fernando Marques in which we prove this conjecture using the min-max theory of minimal surfaces.   Tuesday, March 6, 5:00pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Paul Yang, Princeton University Title: Compactness of conformally compact Einstein metrics Abstract:   Tuesday, March 6, 4:00pm, Hill 705, Rutgers University Speaker: Ovidiu Savin, Columbia University Title: The thin one-phase problem Abstract: We discuss regularity properties of solutions and their free boundaries for minimizers of the thin Bernoulli problem. We show that Lipschitz free boundaries are classical and we obtain a bound on the Hausdorff dimension of the singular set of the free boundary of minimizers. This is a joint work with D. De Silva. Joint Princeton-Rutgers Seminar on Geometric PDE's ---- Fall 2011 (Organizers on Rutgers side: Yanyan Li, Zheng-Chao Han, Natasa Sesum, Jian Song; Coordinator on Princeton side: Luc Nguyen)   Thursday, December 8, 5:00pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Haim Brezis, Rutgers University Title: Sobolev maps with values into the circle Abstract: Real-valued Sobolev functions are well-understood and play an immense role. By c ontrast, the theory of Sobolev maps with values into the unit circle is not yet sufficiently developed. Such maps occur in a number of physical problems. The re ason one is interested in Sobolev maps, rather than smooth maps is to allow maps with point singularities, such as x/|x| in 2-d, or line singularities in 3-d wh ich appear in physical problems. It turns out that these classes of maps have a rich structure. Geometrical and topological effects are already conspicuous, eve n in this very simple framework. On the other hand, the fact that the target spa ce is the circle (as opposed to higher-dimensional manifolds) offers the option to study their lifting and raises some tough questions in Analysis.   Thursday, December 8, 4:00pm, Fine Hall 110, Princeton University Speaker: Gang Tian, Princeton University Title: Bounding scalar curvature along Kahler-Ricci flow Abstract:   Thursday, Oct. 27, 5:00pm, Hill 552, Rutgers University Speaker: Nassif Ghoussoub , University of British Columbia Title: A self-dual polar decomposition for vector fields Abstract: I shall explain how any non-degenerate vector field on a bounded domain of \(R^n \) is monotone modulo a measure preserving involution \(S\) (i.e., \(S2=Identity\)). This is to be compared to Brenier's polar decomposition which yields that any su ch vector field is the gradient of a convex function (i.e., cyclically monotone) modulo a measure preserving transformation. Connections to mass transport --whi ch is at the heart of Brenier's decomposition-- is elucidated. This is joint wor k with A. Momeni.   Thursday, Oct. 27, 4:00pm, Hill 552, Rutgers University Speaker: Aaron Naber, MIT Title: Quantitative Stratification and regularity for Einstein manifolds, harmonic maps and minimal surfaces Abstract: In this talk we discuss new techniques for taking ineffective local, e.g. tangent cone, understanding and deriving from this effective estimates on regularity. Our primary applications are to Einstein manifolds, harmonic maps between Riemannian manifolds, and minimal surfaces. For Einstein manifolds the results include, for all p<2, 'apriori' L^p estimates on the curvature |Rm| and the much stronger curvature scale r_{|Rm|}(x)=max|Rm|leq r^{-2}}. If we assume additionally that the curvature lies in some L^q we are able to prove that r^{-1}_{|Rm|} lies in weak L^2q. For minimizing harmonic maps f we prove W^cap W^ estimates for p<3 for f and the stronger likewise defined regularity scale. These are the first gradient estimates for p>2 and the first L^p estimates on the hessian for any p. The estimates are sharp. For minimizing hypersurfaces we prove L^p estimates for p<7 for the second fundamental form and its regularity scale. The proofs include a new quantitative dimension reduction, that in the process stengthens hausdorff estimates on singular sets to minkowski estimates. This is joint work with Jeff Cheeger.

Statistical Mechanics Conferences

Conference

Simon Thomas: The First Sixty Years

Joseph D'Atri Memorial Lectures 2019

 2019 Joseph D'Atri was born in 1938, received an A.B. from Columbia College in 1959, and received a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1964. He was a member of the Rutgers University Mathematics Department from 1963 until his death in 1993 and served as Chair of the Department from 1985 until 1990. Further information about Professor D'Atri and his work in geometry may be found in the book Topics in Geometry: in Memory of Joseph D'Atri edited by Simon Gindikin and published in 1996 by Birkhauser as volume 20 in the series Progress in Nonlinear Differential Equations and Their Applications. Previous D'Atri Memorial Lectures Lecturer Date Title(s) Luigi Ambrosio Nov 2017 New Estimates on the Matching Problem and Continuity of Nonlinear Eigenvalues with Respect to m-GH Convergence Fernando Coda Marques Feb 2016 Min-max Theory for the Area Functional - a Panorama Frank Merle Jan 2015 A Road Map for the Soliton Resolution Conjecture Universality Questions for Blow-up Behavior for the Mass Critical Korteweg-de-Vries Equations Nicola Fusco Jan 2014 Stability and Minimality of a Non-local Variational Problem The Quantitative Isoperimetric Inequality Vladimir Sverak Dec 2012 Mathematical Aspects of the Navier-Stokes and Euler's Equations Sun-Yung Alice Chang Feb 2012 Conformal Invariants: Perspectives From Geometric PDE Higher Order Isoperimetric Inequalities – An Approach via Method of Optimal Transport Gang Tian Dec 2010 Geometric Equations in Dimension 4 B-field Renormalization Flow on Complex Surfaces Carlos Kenig Feb 2010 Some Recent Applications of Unique Continuation to Mathematical Physics, PDE, and Fourier Analysis The Global Behavior of Solutions to Critical Non-Linear Dispersive and Wave Equations Yakov Eliashberg Oct 2008 Symplectic Topology of Stein ManifoldsOn the Border between Flexible and Rigid Mathematics Henri Berestycki Nov 2006 Reaction-Diffusion Equations in Nonhomogeneous Media Neil Trudinger Mar 2006 Nonlinear Elliptic PDE and Optimal TransportationNonlinear Elliptic PDE and Geometric Invariance Helmut Hofer Nov 2004 Somewhere Between Hamiltonian Dynamics and Symplectic Geometry Paul Rabinowitz 2004 An Aubry-Mather Theory for Partial Differential Equations Richard Hamilton 2003 On the Ricci Flow Luis A. Caffarelli 2002 Constraint Methods for Nonlinear Homogenization in Periodic and Random Media, I, II Brian White 2001 Total Curvature, Soap Films and the Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics Stefan Hildebrandt 2000 On Two-dimensional Parametric Variational Problems Uniqueness Results for Minimal Surfaces with Free Boundaries Richard Schoen 1999 The Plateau Problem in Complex Geometry Nigel Hitchin 1998 Hyperkahler Geometry Misha Gromov 1997 Metric Geometry of Algebraic Manifolds Eugenio Calabi 1995 On Singular Sympletic Structures John Milnor 1994 Geometry and Dynamics Jacques Faraut 1993 Ordered Symmetric Spaces

24th D'Atri Memorial Lectures

poster

Mathematics Department Alumni Web Page - Archive

This purpose of this webpage is to provide contact information and news items about Rutgers Mathematics Department alumni. If you prefer that an item that you sent not be listed on this page or be modified, please send email to .

In memoriam

Vladimir Scheffer 1950-2023 Our long-time colleague Vladimir Scheffer passed away on April 14th after complications from a brief illness.  More information can be found at https://www.spezzifuneralhome.com/memorials/vladimir-scheffer/5178281/service-details.php.  Vladimir Scheffer's mathematical work is best noted for his breakthrough results on the regularity of the notoriously difficult Navier-Stokes equation, where he showed solutions to a modification of this equation have a singular set of relatively small size.  This work remains highly influential to this day, with nearly 200 citations.  In addition to his work on the Navier-Stokes, Vladimir and our former colleague Jean Taylor prepared a roughly 1,000 page proof by their Ph.D. advisor Fred Almgren, which was posthumously published due to their dedicated efforts.  Such a lengthy work was very hard to distribute, and thus Vladimir's selfless efforts here (which included retyping and re-typesetting the entire document!) were crucial to the dissemination of major ideas (which in turn influenced important modern work). According to Fields medalist Cedric Villani the so-called Scheffer-Shnirelman paradox is the most surprising mathematical paradox, even surpassing the Banach-Tarski "volume doubling" paradox, since the former does not invoke the axiom of choice.  Jeremy Gray goes so far as to call it "surely the most astonishing result in all of fluid mechanics".  Vladimir was also a very popular undergraduate teacher, often coordinating the many sections of Calculus, and loved by both students and colleagues for his gentle nature.  He was also a crucial faculty member in our undergraduate operation, and a constant go-to source of wisdom on many important details of calculus instruction at Rutgers.        Patricia Diane Barr, JANUARY 7, 1935 – DECEMBER 11, 2022 "With heavy hearts we announce Patricia Diane Barr (née Cotter) of Whiting, NJ passed away Sunday, December 11, 2022 at the age of 87. Born January 7, 1935 in Pittsburgh, PA. Pat’s adventures lead her to live in Chicago, Virginia and finally settling in the Jersey shore area in the early 60’s. She retired from the Mathematics Department of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ in 2011".  Pat was a cheerful, very friendly, and hysterically funny source of energy for our department. From https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/whiting-nj/patricia-barr-11054740   Jerrold Bates Tunnell      Our longtime colleague Jerry Tunnell died in a bicycle accident on April 1, 2022. The following tribute comes from Steve Miller: Jerry Tunnell was an active member of the Rutgers Number Theory group for nearly 40 years.  He advised 7 PhD students and shaped the careers of many more in his brilliant courses on algebraic number theory and algebraic geometry.  Jerry's deep understanding of the latter led to particularly insightful courses on algebraic geometry, with a familiarity and unique approach which is sadly now lost to humanity. Many of Jerry's research works will still be studied by mathematicians a century after they were written.  His most famous accomplishment, the Langlands-Tunnell Theorem, is one of the foundations on which the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was built.  Perhaps even more striking in many respects was his work on the congruent number problem, a paper dense with repeated brilliant insights into the relation between an ancient problem about triangles and several cutting-edge aspects about L-functions, modular forms, and elliptic curves.  Jerry's work on supercuspidal representations was also pioneering.  Each of these deserves much more space and description than can be given here. Jerry's depth of understanding and knowledge served as an amazing resource for our number theory community.  His friendliness and approachability will surely be missed.   Earl Jay Taft (1931-2022) Earl Taft died on Aug. 9, 2021 in Florida. Earl was a member of the mathematics department from 1959 until his retirement in 2018, at the age of 87. See obituary and wikipedia. He was founding editor-in-chief of the notable journal Communications in Algebra, see here.   Maria (Sao) Carvalho    Maria Conceicao (Sao) Carvalho, a longterm scientific visitor to our department, passed away on June 28, 2021 after a long struggle with cancer.   Until the last few months, she had maintained the upper hand in this struggle for many years, continuing to live her life fully, including continuing her research program and delivering talks at conferences. She is survived by her husband, Eric Carlen, and a number of close cousins in Portugal.   Wolmer Vasconcelos (1937-2021) Wolmer Vasconcelos died on June 14, 2021 in Florida. Wolmer was a member of the mathematics department from 1967 until his retirement in 2010.    He was a pillar of our algebra group, and a much-valued and beloved member of the department.    He is survived by his wife Aurea. Here is an announcement from the commalg.org website   Richard Wheeden (1940-2020) Dr. Richard (Dick) Lee Wheeden, 79, died on April 9, 2020 in a tragic accident. He was struck by a tree that felled by high winds in St. Michaels, Maryland, while out for his daily walk. Born on November 29, 1940 in Baltimore, Maryland to Lee and Ruth Wheeden, Dick graduated high school from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in three years. He earned his B.S. in Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University and both his master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ offered Dr. Wheeden a year with globally renowned mathematicians. In 1967, he accepted a tenure track position at Rutgers University. He spent the next 50 years teaching and conducting research there, retiring in 2016 to the Eastern Shore of Maryland, with the title of Distinguished Professor Emeritus. Dick met his life-long love, Sharon Lee McGlasson, when they were only 14 years old. They married in 1962 and were the parents of two children, Mike and Abbie and the proud grandparents of five grandchildren. He is survived by Sharon, his son Michael (Kristen) of Bethesda, MD, and daughter Abbie (Bill) McCauley of Tallmadge, OH. He was a loving grandfather to Cameron, Zachary, and Brady Wheeden and to Amelia and Benjamin McCauley. He is also survived by his sister Carolyn (Ernie) Ilgenfritz of Easton, MD and many extended family and close friends. While Sharon was his great love, math was the other. During his brief retirement, Dick continued his research in mathematics, resulting in many published papers. He was active in the Home Owners Association and volunteered on several projects to maintain the quality and beauty of the historic Perry Cabin homes. He was a member of the Wye Fellows of the Aspen Institute, where he enjoyed many inspirational talks and concerts. Dick loved his family, being outdoors, eating crabs, and doing math. He is remembered for his intellect, humility, and his kind, gentle soul. He was loved and will be deeply missed. A celebration of life will be held at a later date, when the world is a safer place and we can gather together. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked for donations in his honor to The American Porphyria Foundation (www.porphyriafoundation.org.)  (Here is a tribute to Dick Wheeden  by Sagun Chanillo, from AMS Notices February 2022.) William Irvine (1942-2019) William (Bill) Irvine, who was an Instructor for the Department of Mathematics from 1995 to 2017,  passed away on Thursday December 5, 2019. He was 77 years old. Besides his many years of teaching, Bill served the department in a number of ways over the years, including as Assistant to the Vice Chair for Undergraduate affairs, and as coordinator of the Mathematics Summer Session.   He is remembered as a cheerful colleague who would meet others with a hearty greeting and ready smile. Bill came to Rutgers as an Instructor in 1995, after  a long and successful career in the United States Air Force. He served in Turkey and the Middle East and throughout the United States before retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel.  He was a master woodworker and published a book titled Random Musings.   Bill was predeceased by his wife Debra Irvine in 2010.  He is survived by wife Emy Irvine of Somerset and his children Scott Irvine, Lori Beasley, Jennifer Warren, and David Irvine along with his many grandchildren. Jose Barros-Neto (1927-2020) José Barros-Neto, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, died peacefully at his home in Novi, Michigan on January 14, 2020.   He was a consummate mathematician for 92 years and enjoyed a fulfilling career at Rutgers for 31 years until his retirement on January 1, 2000. Math was in his bones, and not one of his four children or four grandchildren could turn 7, 11, 13, 17, and so on without being reminded that they were celebrating a “prime” birthday. He received his Ph.D. in 1960 from Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, where he met his beloved wife of 70 years, Iva Borsari Barros. In his early career, he studied at the Sorbonne, and Yale University. He was named a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in 1961 and 1962 in Field of Mathematics, Latin America & Caribbean. Research, teaching, and three growing girls occupied his time at Brandeis University, the University of Montreal, Rochester Institute of Technology and back to the University of São Paulo. His long career at Rutgers began in 1968, when the family settled in Princeton, NJ, and a son soon followed. He was honored to take sabbaticals at The Institute for Advanced Studies, in Fall 1971 and 1989-1990. He was dedicated to his research interests in functional analysis, and partial differential equations. He valued his many friends and collaborators in the field of mathematics. José’s family was truly a Rutgers family. His wife, Iva, earned her Masters Degree in French Literature at Rutgers University. All four of his children, and one son-in-law, graduated from a Rutgers University affiliated college. During his tenure at Rutgers, José authored four books, College Algebra and Trigonometry with Applications, An Introduction to the Theory of Distributions (Pure and Applied Mathematics), Hypoelliptic Boundary-Value Problems (Lecture Notes in Pure and Applied Mathematics) and College Algebra with Applications. His textbooks became quite popular with students. José was particularly proud to hear from a student in China who had obtained a copy of An Introduction to the Theory of Distributions and was finally able to understand the concept. That student became a mathematician and was inspired to translate the book into Chinese. José was an avid soccer fan, in particular, Brazilian soccer. He enjoyed traveling in the United States and abroad. Reading, painting, gardening, and classical music were among his diverse interests. José, and his family, enjoyed spending relaxing summers in Cape Cod, and later, Martha’s Vineyard. This was where he would reconnect with collegial friends. He loved the quiet beauty of Martha’s Vineyard and featured his favorite spots in several figures in his books. He was preceded in death by his wife, Iva, who passed away peacefully on November 30, 2019 at their home in Michigan. He is survived by his four children, Carmen, Claudia, Marilia and André, their spouses, Jack, Tom, Michael and Marlena, and four wonderful grandchildren, Colin, Kevin, Alexandria and James. José is also survived by his loving family in Brazil, his brother and two sisters, and their families.   Hyman Zimmerberg (1921-2019) Hyman J Zimmerberg died peacefully at home in the house he built 64 years ago in Highland Park, NJ. He lived his 98 years with vigor, intellectual curiosity and humor. Born at home on Hester Street in New York City’s Lower East Side on September 7, 1921, Hyman moved as a child to Brooklyn where he played stickball in the street while listening to baseball games on neighborhood radios perched on the tenement window sills. Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Rutgers University, Hyman was best known on campus for his active support for academic freedom. When he was president of the Rutgers chapter of the American Association of University Professors, he led the defense of antiwar speaker and Rutgers historian Eugene Genovese in the 1960s and helped block Genovese’s firing. He later played a role in the recognition of the AAUP as the faculty bargaining unit. He had learned the value of unions, along with the importance of education and family, from his parents, Morris and Manya Zimmerberg, immigrants from Poland. Hyman attended Brooklyn College where he met his first wife, Helen Yarmush Zimmerberg. Hyman was the President of the Math Club; their three-man team of undergraduates won the Putnam Competition, the most prestigious university-level mathematics competition in the world. The Math Club also proclaimed their support for the Abraham Lincoln Brigade—American volunteers, many of them college-age, who took up arms for the Spanish Republic against the fascist General Franco. Receiving his BA in 1941, Hyman moved west to attend graduate school at the University of Chicago. After their marriage in 1943, Helen joined him in Chicago and began her graduate studies in biochemistry. Their early marriage had a secret – Helen was also working in a lab under the football stadium as part of the Manhattan Project, investigating the biological dangers of radiation exposure. Hyman contributed to the war effort by teaching trigonometry to soldiers learning meteorology to guide the Air Corps bombers over Europe. After completing his PhD in 1945, Hyman began his first academic position at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Helen entered graduate school at Duke University. Uncomfortable with the Jim Crow segregation encountered there, they were happy to move back north in 1946 when Hyman accepted a position in the Math Department at Rutgers College. They began their family with the birth of daughter Sharon in 1947. Betty, Joshua, and Morris would follow. The most profound sorrow that Hyman and Helen faced was the loss of their daughter, Sharon, from cancer at the age of 21. Professor Zimmerberg taught at Rutgers until his retirement in 1991. His published scholarship was on Algebraic Boundary Value problems in the field of Analysis. He was particularly proud of his development and directorship of a National Science Foundation Undergraduate Research Participation Program in Math from 1962-1977. Hyman loved to travel. Each summer the family would head north or west for a camping trip, exploring many national parks. Hyman was always physically active, bicycling, gardening, and pitching for the Math Department softball team. After his daughter’s death, Hyman started long distance running. He ran the New York City marathon five times, and the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington DC thrice. He also ran in many 10K races, especially loving the Falmouth Road Race while visiting son Joshua at the Woods Hole Marine Biology Labs. Hyman ran well into his 80’s, winning many trophies for his age group! Hyman looked back fondly on a sabbatical semester spent in 1972 at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel, with Helen and their youngest son, Morris. After their retirement, he and Helen traveled to Europe, Israel and Peru. They spent several months a year in Sante Fe, New Mexico, where Morris now lives, and on Cape Cod with the families of Betty and Joshua. They were active and loyal members of the Highland Park Conservative Temple and Center. Sadly, his love and intellectual companion of 58 years, Helen, died in 2001. Hyman married his second wife, Francine Rosen Kritchek, in 2006. He knew her from his days at Brooklyn College, where she had been a close friend of Helen’s. Francine had a long and happy marriage to her first husband, Irwin Kritchek, raising two daughters, Suzi and Robin, on Long Island. Hyman and Francine reconnected after Irwin’s death, and enjoyed their “elder” romance and companionship until her death in 2018. Hyman is survived by his two younger sisters, Sylvia Cohen and Eleanor Halpern. He is also survived by his three children and their partners, Betty Zimmerberg and Dale Fink, Joshua Zimmerberg and Teresa Jones, and Morris Zimmerberg and Iku Fujimatsu. Hyman also leaves grandchildren, Julia and Patrick Aziz, Daniel and Sarah Glick, Jessica Zimmerberg-Helms and Seth Applebaum, Jonah Zimmerberg Helms, Rin Fujimatsu, Aaron Zimmerberg, Joseph Zimmerberg, Nathan Zimmerberg, and Jacob Fink. In addition are six great-grandchildren, Kaleb Aziz, Jeremiah Aziz, Marisa Aziz, Bella Malvesti, Arthur Glick, and Wren Glick. Hyman is also survived by his step-children Robin and Kenny Onufrock and Suzi and Charles Schultz. Hyman will also be missed by his nephew Mark and nieces Janet, Susan, Marcia and Laurie, and their partners and children. The whole family can recite Uncle Hy’s mathematical jokes and riddles.   Cornelia Mary Kinsella (1961-2019) Cornelia Kinsella, a Business Specialist for the Department of Mathematics, passed away on Thursday April 4, 2019.  As our departmental administrator for contracts and grants, Cornelia played a crucial role in helping faculty to apply for and administer the external grant funding that supports the many research and education projects carried out by the department.  Cornelia was valued for her professionalism, her dedication, and her positive presence, which she maintained in spite of the serious health challenges that she faced. She was an inspiration to all who worked with her, and will be sadly and fondly missed.           Jane Smiley Cronin Scanlon (1923-2018) Jane Smiley Cronin Scanlon, 95, passed away Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at her home in Piscataway. Born in Manhattan, NY to John and Janet Cronin, she attended high school in Highland Park, Michigan where she discovered a life-long passion for physics and mathematics. She graduated from Wayne State University with a B.S in mathematics, and ultimately received a PhD from the University of Michigan in mathematics in 1949. Jane accepted a post-doctoral positions at both Harvard and Princeton and taught at Wheaton College in Massachusetts for several years. She spent many years teaching at Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute before accepting a position at Rutgers College as a full professor of mathematics in 1970. Jane had a great intellect. Her research interests in mathematics were broad, spanning both pure and applied mathematics. She is the author of numerous research papers and books, including a widely used textbook in Advanced Calculus. Jane’s research was considered ground-breaking and original. She mentored and sponsored many students in mathematics who were pursuing their graduate degrees, and was a very popular teacher and lecturer. Jane attended conferences in mathematics all over the world, including the Soviet Union, as well as Eastern and Western Europe. Her professional career spanned more than forty years, and she retired as professor emerita in mathematics from Rutgers University in 1991. She continued her research in mathematics, working with other scientists in physics and medicine, until the last two years of her life. In addition to her professional interests, she enjoyed walking, fencing, literature, poetry, history, genealogy and antique furniture. Her literary interests were broad and included Shakespeare, Tolstoy, C.P. Snow, Agatha Christie, Maeve Binchy and Mary Higgins Clark. Her favorite places were Boston, London, Budapest, as well as numerous sites in Greece. She is survived by her four children, Justin of Flint MI, Mary Hathaway and husband Bill of Simsbury CT (daughters Allison and Sarah), Anne Yamakaitis and husband Mark of Clark NJ (daughter Bernadette and sons Mark and Jude) and Edmund and wife Michelle of Warren NJ (daughter Erin and son Gregory.)   Charles Sims (1937-2017) Charles Coffin Sims, 80, of St. Petersburg, FL, passed away October 23, 2017 at The Marion and Bernard L. Samson Nursing Center. Born and raised in Elkhart, Indiana, he attended high school in Elkhart and received his Bachelors of Science at the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in mathematics from Harvard University. After Harvard, he taught briefly at MIT before moving to New Jersey where he spent most of his adult life, living first in Princeton and then in Allenhurst. He was a professor of mathematics at Rutgers University for 42 years and a pioneer in the field of computational group theory, influencing the careers of group theorists around the world who followed him. In addition to his many contributions to research in his field of study, he was deeply devoted to mathematics education and spent much of his time at Rutgers ensuring quality instruction for generations of students. After retirement, Charles continued to help students learn mathematics by tutoring local children in St. Petersburg. He was a devoted husband, brother, and father and active in church and church choirs throughout his life. In fact he met his wife Annette of 47 years singing in choir at Harvard-Epworth United Methodist Church in Cambridge, MA. In his later years Charles and Annette made St. Petersburg their home. Together they enjoyed their community, four dogs and cat, and spending time on Tampa Bay on their boat. Charles also collaborated with his sister Mary Jean on preserving family archives. He was a modest, kind, much-loved man who left lasting impressions on everyone he met or who benefited from his academic work.     Michael Ernest O'Nan (1943-2017) Mike was born in Fort Knox, Kentucky and was educated as an undergraduate at Stanford University and as a graduate student at Princeton University. While at Princeton he made contact with Danny Gorenstein, who became his thesis adviser. His thesis (1969) reflected what would be a long-time interest: finite doubly-transitive permutation groups, explored with block designs and related combinatorial structures. The thesis was a characterization, among doubly transitive groups, of the three-dimensional unitary groups over finite fields. After a year or two at the University of Chicago, Mike came to Rutgers, shortly after Gorenstein did. He quickly reached the rank of full professor. Through the 1970's he was the leading figure in the world in the study of finite doubly transitive groups, bringing original and effective ideas to the effort to classify them. In a remarkable series of papers he completed the classification except for a single case--doubly transitive groups in which the stabilizer of a point is a simple group, or "almost" simple. Shortly after that the tidal wave of the classification of finite simple groups washed over the whole area and as a result, in my opinion, Mike's work has not received the long-term recognition that it deserves. He will be remembered for his 1975 discovery of one of the sporadic finite simple groups, called the O'Nan group or the O'Nan-Sims simple group, since it was Charlie Sims, partly in collaboration with Sims's student Steve Andrilli, who proved the existence and uniqueness of the group, after Mike had predicted many properties of the group. Following the classification of simple groups, he independently proved what has come to be known as the O'Nan-Scott Theorem or Aschbacher-O'Nan-Scott Theorem. It is a taxonomy of maximal subgroups of the finite alternating and symmetric groups, and a related taxonomy of all finite primitive permutation groups. It has been widely used in finite group theory since 1980, being a tool that fits naturally with the classification of finite simple groups. Mike was quick-witted, and widely admired and liked in the world of finite group theory. He was a generous teacher and a loyal friend. He had one Ph.D. student, Dick Stafford, of the National Security Agency. As one of his colleagues has written, his good cheer and twinkling smile radiated happiness at being in the game of life.   Myles Tierney (1937-2017) From ncatlab Myles Tierney was a Rutgers faculty member for thirty-four years, coming to Rutgers as an Associate Professor in 1968 following positions at Rice University (1965-6) and at the ETH-Forschungsinstitut für Mathematik, Zürich (1966-68). He received his B.A. from Brown University in 1959 and his Ph.D. from Columbia in 1965. Myles began his career as an algebraic topologist, moved toward category theory and was responsible (together with F.W. Lawvere) for the introduction of a new field within category theory: elementary topoi. Myles Tierney died on October 6, 2017 having turned 80 in September.       William L. Hoyt (1928-2017) From obituary  William Lind Hoyt, age 89, passed away on Thursday, September 14, 2017, in Madison, WI. He was born Sep. 8, 1928, in Nephi, Utah, the son of the late William Lorraine Hoyt and Vivian (Petersen) Hoyt. Bill was a graduate of the University of Utah, and earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Chicago in 1958. He taught for six years at Brandeis University in Waltham, MA, and spent the rest of his career on the math faculty at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ. His research interests included algebraic geometry, elliptic surfaces, and modular forms.             Felix E. Browder (1927-2016) Felix E. Browder, a renowned mathematics professor who completed his doctorate by age 20 and joined Rutgers as its first vice president for research in 1986, passed away on December 10, 2016, at his Princeton home. He was 89.He was currently a university professor in the School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Browder received the 1999 National Medal of Science, the nation's highest science and engineering honor. But he had been tainted by the association with his father, Earl Browder, a longtime leader of the U.S. Communist Party, according to The Washington Post.During a 1953 hearing of the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities, the Post writes that a professor at MIT, where Felix Browder earned his undergraduate degree at 18, testified that the younger Browder had never joined the party and “was the best student we had ever had in mathematics in MIT in the 90 years of existence of the institution.”Browder was cited by the National Science Foundation, which administers the National Medal of Science, for pioneering mathematical work in the creation of nonlinear functional analysis and its applications to partial differential equations. He was also recognized for serving as a leader in the scientific community and expanding the range of interaction of mathematics with other disciplines. Browder had served as president of the 33,000-member American Mathematical Society. Obituary from the Washington Post Memorial to Felix Browder, compiled and edited by Haim Brezis, including numerous personal reminiscences      Abbas Bahri (1955-2016) Our colleague Abbas Bahri passed away on January 10, 2016 after four years of heroic fight against two forms of cancer.    More information   András Hajnal (1931-2016) We are sad to report that András Hajnal, who served as Director of DIMACS from 1994 to 1995, passed away on July 30 at the age of 85. Hajnal came to DIMACS after a 40-year career at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, and remained at Rutgers as a professor in the Department of Mathematics until his retirement in 2004 when he returned to Hungary.He was elected in 1982 as member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and directed its Mathematical Institute from 1982 to 1992.  He served as general secretary of the János Bolyai Mathematical Society from 1980 to 1990, and president of the society from 1990 to 1994. His contributions to mathematics were recognized by prizes that include the Academy Prize in 1967, Tibor Szele medal from the János Bolyai Mathematical Society in 1980, and Middle Cross Merit Order Medal from the President of the Republic of Hungary in 2013. More information          

A History of Mathematics at Rutgers

For a history of Mathematics at Rutgers by Charles Weibel, please visit THIS PAGE . (originally written in 1995)

Facilities and Local Area

Hill Center Computer facilities The Library Geography Climate   Hill Center The Mathematics Graduate Program at Rutgers is housed in the Hill Center for the Mathematical Sciences, a seven-story building on the Busch Campus in Piscataway Township, New Jersey. It is close to the Engineering and Physics buildings. Hill Center and the adjoining CoRE building also contain the Departments of Computer Science and Statistics, and the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science (DIMACS). Office space is provided to all full-time graduate students in mathematics. On the seventh floor is a lounge area, where coffee and tea are served to faculty and students of the department each afternoon while classes are in session. The seventh floor probably has the most spectacular views of any location at Rutgers: see Manhattan on a clear day! There is also a smaller informal room (Hill 701) set aside as a gathering place for graduate students. The third floor of Hill Center contains most staff and administrative offices for mathematics, as well as the mail room and copy room. The "Hill" of Hill Center commemorates George William Hill (1838-1904). He was a Rutgers graduate who studied the motion (especially the precession) of Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and the moon. His analysis was modeled on what we now call Hill's equation, which is the ordinary differential equation    y'' = p(t) y.   G.W. Hill was also the first president of the American Mathematical Society (1894-96). If you liked these facts, you may want to find out more about the history of Rutgers' mathematics department. TOP Computer facilities The Department of Mathematics in New Brunswick has a variety of networked computing resources available for both general and research purposes, with a full-time staff dedicated to systems and user support. The network is primarily a Sun-based UNIX system, although the staff's PCs use Windows and Linux. Three Sun server clusters with a total of 10 machines are dedicated to support of research and education. The primary users are faculty, staff, graduate students, and departmental visitors. Most computer needs of undergraduates are met by various large university systems. There are approximately 200 workstations, ranging from X-terminals to Sparcs and Ultras, with network printers, scanners, and PC's located throughout the building, both in offices and general access computer labs. The department also provides dialup access for faculty, staff, and graduate students. Common languages such as Java, C, C++, Perl, Fortran, Pascal, and Lisp are available, as are document preparation tools such as TeX and packages such as Maple, Matlab, and Mathematica. Our computers are networked via 10/100 MBps Ethernet, so members of the department have access to all Rutgers computing services and to the Internet. Much useful information about Math Department computers and computing is available through the Math Department's Computing Information Services web page. TOP The library The Mathematical Sciences Library is located in Hill Center. It has an extensive and specialized collection containing more than 36,000 monographs, with about 700 current journal subscriptions and more than 23,000 bound journals. Electronic access to all of the university library system and to other libraries is possible using terminals in the library and via the Internet. The university holds more than three million volumes, and is among the top 25 research libraries nationally. The university also has electronic access to a wide variety of journals and preprint servers. TOP Rutgers geography Rutgers is a university partially funded by the State of New Jersey, with substantial additional contributions from students (tuition) and other sources (such as research grants from the U.S. government). Rutgers has facilities in many parts of the state, but most graduate programs are located in and around New Brunswick, New Jersey. New Brunswick is located in the center of New Jersey. It is approximately 50 km (30 miles) south of New York City. It is about 30 km (20 miles) north of Princeton (home of Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study), and 100 km (60 miles) north of Philadelphia. New York City, Philadelphia, and Princeton are accessible by public transportation (frequent bus and train connections are available). Automobiles can also be used, but driving can be difficult at peak traffic periods, and they do pollute the air. New Brunswick is in an urban "corridor" stretching between two large metropolitan areas: New York and Philadelphia. Much of New Jersey is quite densely populated. Thus it is interesting that some of the nicest ocean beaches in the world are 45 minutes from campus, and some truly marvelous mountains, hiking trails and campgrounds are about an hour away (in the other direction). New Brunswick originated as a ferry crossing on the Raritan River. The river is still a central part of university life, because Rutgers has four campuses in and around New Brunswick, two on each side of the Raritan. Although Rutgers was founded in 1766, the oldest extant part of Rutgers University (dating from 1810) is the College Avenue Campus in downtown New Brunswick. On the southern outskirts of New Brunswick is the Cook/Douglass campus, which has lovely display gardens dating from 1864, when Rutgers was designated the state's agricultural university. The Livingston and Busch campuses are across the Raritan river in Piscataway. The Busch campus is primarily dedicated to science and engineering, and is adjacent to the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Historical note: Piscataway was founded in 1666, substantially before New Brunswick (1681), Rutgers (1766) or the United States (1776). The name "Piscataway" may come from a phrase in the American Indian Lenape language, meaning "It is getting dark." Almost all graduate mathematics classes and seminars are in Hill Center. Also, the Mathematical Sciences Library is in Hill Center. However, graduate students will likely need to visit other campuses. For example, undergraduate instruction in mathematics takes place on all four campuses (so Teaching Assistants will almost surely travel). English as a Second Language (ESL) is on Livingston and the International Center is on the College Avenue Campus. Some university housing is located on other campuses. There is a free intercampus bus system which works reasonably well. The distances between campuses are approximately 1.5 to 2.5 km (1 to 1.5 miles) and can be walked or biked, but not comfortably in certain weather conditions. Parking a car can be difficult. TOP Climate: the temperate zone Seasons vary in New Jersey. Here are facts for New Brunswick, from The New Jersey Weather Book published some years ago (and now out of print!) by the Rutgers University Press: MonthMean TemperatureMean Precipitation January -1°C; 30.2°F 8.76 cm; 3.45 inches February 0°C; 32.0°F 7.52 cm; 2.96 inches March 4.67°C; 40.4°F 10.26 cm; 4.04 inches April 10.72°C; 51.3°F 9.58 cm; 3.77 inches May 16.06°C; 60.9°F 9.91 cm; 3.90 inches June 20.94°C; 69.7°F 8.28 cm; 3.26 inches July 23.72°C; 74.7°F 11.15 cm; 4.39 inches August 22.94°C; 73.3°F 12.45 cm; 4.90 inches September 19.11°C; 66.4°F 9.98 cm; 3.93 inches October 13°C; 55.4°F 8.46 cm; 3.33 inches November 7.33°C; 45.2°F 9.70 cm; 3.82 inches December 1.28°C; 34.4°F 9.53 cm; 3.75 inches The temperatures in this table are 24 hour, monthly means. Daily extremes can vary considerably from these means. Temperature in a typical year can range from -15 to 35 °C (5 to 95 °F). Summers are often hazy, hot, and humid, and may be uncomfortable to many people much of the time. Most office buildings have air conditioning, which reduces both air temperature and moisture content. Winters are not arctic, but can be chilly. The precipitation column is liquid equivalent depth. Please realize that snow is much fluffier than water, so there can be substantial snow accumulations. Much more common in the winter, however, are ice and slush. Fall and spring are usually comfortable transitional seasons. Note that it is rarely dry here for long: rain is common. Further information is available.

About Us

The Mathematics Department undertakes internationally-recognized research in all areas of pure and applied mathematics and mathematics education and provides quality instruction for an annual undergraduate enrollment of approximately twenty-four thousand, as well as five hundred majors in three different curriculum codes*.  Consistently ranked among the top twenty-five programs in the country, the Department counts over forty Fellows of the American Mathematical Society or Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, three members of the National Academy as well as a winners of national and university-wide teaching prizes. Approximately sixty tenure-track faculty hold lines entirely within the department or share appointments with computer science, physics, engineering, and education.  Together with thirty teaching-focused faculty the department educates students from all Schools at Rutgers as well as high-school students and teachers from around the State of New Jersey.     * Curriculum Codes: Mathematics 640, Biomathematics 122, and Statistics/Mathematics 961.

Garden State Math Competition Results

Rutgers undergraduates took the top two individual spots, and placed second and third in the team competition, in the Garden State Mathematics Competition.   Terence Coelho and Elliot Glazer placed first and second respectively, while in the team competition Rutgers took 2nd place (Maine Christos, Roberta Shapiro, and Patrick Chen), and 3rd place (Terence Coelho and Elliot Glazer)

New Math Biology Courses

Starting with the 2001 Academic Year, the math department expects to offer two new courses: 640:336, Differential Equations in Biology (F'01). 640:338, Discrete and Probabilistic Models in Biology (S'02). The new course Math 336 will have Ordinary Differential Equations (640:244 or 640:252) as a prerequisite. The course Math 338 will keep the old 338 prerequisites of linear algebra and probability. In the future, students will be able to get credit for both 336 and 338, and both courses will be required for Biomath majors. (But please note: if you take 338 before the 2001/2002 year, you will need to obtain special permission to have both courses count, because 338 in the Spring of 2001 is the same course as what will become 336.) For further information, please look at the web page for the Spring 01 338 course; this course covered the material which is expected to be covered in the new 336 course.  

Rutgers shares top honors at International Association for Quantitative Finance (IAQF) competition

International Association for Quantitative Finance( IAQF) announced that Rutgers, UC Berkeley, and Baruch College NY share the honor of having the three winning student teams in the 2017 IAQF Academic Affiliate Membership Student Competition. MSMF's ACE team of six students -- Zongsheng Sun (team captain), Lingfeng Li, Haidong Gu, Xinrong Song, Lin Du, and Bowen Long were mentored by Sunita Jagtiani, our Director for Career Services Management, and Triet Pham, Teaching Assistant Professor of Mathematics.

The Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award

Daniel Gorenstein (1923-1992)   The Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award was established in 1993 by the family, friends, and colleagues of Danny Gorenstein to commemorate his outstanding mathematical research, his skillful and enthusiastic exposition of his field, and his wise and devoted service to Rutgers University. The Award is given for outstanding scholarly achievement to a Rutgers faculty member who has also performed exceptional service to the University community. The winners of the Gorenstein Memorial Award have been: 1994         Gerald N. Grob, History of Medicine1995        George L. Levine, English, Faculty of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick1996        Hans Fisher, Nutritional Sciences, Cook College1997        G. Terence Wilson, Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick1998        Robert L. Wilson, Mathematics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick1999        Lloyd C. Gardner, History, Faculty of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick2000        Brent D. Ruben, Communication, SCILS2001        Noemie Koller, Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick2002        Joanna Burger, Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick2003        David Mechanic, University Professor2004        Glenn Shafer, Accounting and Information Systems, School of Business2005        Alan Conney, Cancer and Leukemia Research, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy2006        Sandra Harris, Clinical Psychology, GSAPP2007        Richard S. Falk, Mathematics, School of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick2008        Ziva Galili, History, School of Arts and Sciences - New Brunswick2009        Barbara A. Lee, Human Resource Management, School of Management and Labor Relations2010        Yogesh Jaluria, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School of Engineering2011        Daniel Hart, Psychology and Childhood Students, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers Camden2012        Joachim Kohn, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences2013        Allan Horwitz, Sociology, School of Arts and Sciences2014        Cheryl Wall, English, School of Arts and Sciences2015        James Turner Johnson, Department of Religion, School of Arts and Sciences2016        Dr. Jolie Cizewski, Distinguished Professor of Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, School of Arts and Sciences

Faculty honors: Joel Lebowitz awarded Dirac medal, Sontag receives Bellman award

Joel Lebowitz, the George William Hill Professor of Mathematics and Physics, has been awarded the 2022 Dirac Medal by the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, one of the very top honors in mathematical physics. The award goes to Joel, Elliot Lieb, and David Ruelle, "for groundbreaking and mathematically rigorous contributions to the understanding of the statistical mechanics of classical and quantum physical systems".  David Ruelle was also a member of our department for many years . Rutgers is also the home of other winners of the Dirac Medal -- including Mathematics Graduate Faculty member Greg Moore.  More information can be found here: ICTP - 2022 ICTP Dirac Medal Winners Announced. Emeritus Professor Eduardo Sontag was awarded the 2022 Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award, which is the highest recognition in control theory and engineering in the US.  The citation reads “For pioneering contributions to stability analysis and nonlinear control, and for advancing the control theoretic foundations of systems biology.”

Contact Info

  Department of Mathematics, Rutgers UniversityHill Center for the Mathematical Sciences 110 Frelinghuysen Rd.Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019  Directions to Hill Center Main Department Phone and Fax:  (Tel) 848-445-2390 - (Fax) 732-445-5530 Undergraduate Advisor:  , Hill 308, 848-445-6989 Undergraduate Office:   , Hill 303, 848-445-2390 Graduate Secretary:  , Hill 306, 848-445-6994 Mathematical Finance Program:  , Hill 348, 848-445-3920

Facilities

Undergraduate Common Room Hill Center 323 is a place for undergraduate math majors to meet, discuss mathematics, and use computers. The room is also used for meetings of the undergraduate honors seminar, and for special talks for undergraduates about mathematics or careers in the mathematical sciences. Computer Accounts All Rutgers students are entitled to an account on the university computer eden and every campus in Rutgers - New Brunswick/Piscataway has fully equipped computer labs for the use of students. The computer terminals in the undergraduate common room, Hill 323, are for math majors only. To use them it is necessary to open an account on the undergraduate server, gauss. This computer is for declared mathematics majors. Interested majors should inquire in Hill 322 (see Risa Hynes). Mathematical Software The department offers several courses which require the use of software packages capable of sophisticated scientific calculation, three-dimensional graphics, and symbolic manipulation. In some courses, including third-semester calculus, differental equations, and numerical analysis, Maple is used. Rutgers has a license that makes Maple available on many systems, including eden, the PC labs on every campus, and the mathematics department's servers. In other courses, for example the computer sections of linear algebra (Math 250, C sections), and Math 357, Matlab is used.  Matlab is available on gauss and at the Rutgers computer labs. For information on software and the servers where it is available, see the list of campus computing facilities. Full-scale versions of these software packages are costly. Student versions are available at a moderate price at the Rutgers University Bookstore and elsewhere. These student versions can handle only objects of moderate size (adequate for most uses) and do not include user support. Although formal courses dealing solely with the use of these packages do not constitute college-level work, it should be part of every mathematics student's out-of-class education to become thoroughly familiar with at least one such package.

Course Schedule

View the Spring 2024 Schedule

Minors

School of Arts and Sciences Minor in Mathematics:   A minor in mathematics consists of: Three terms of calculus; ordinarily 01:640:151, 152, 251 Introduction to Linear Algebra (01:640:250) Four additional 3-credit courses chosen from 01:640:252, 244 and 300-400 level courses in the mathematics department (01:640:491, 492 do not satisfy this requirement). Grades of C or better are required in 01:640:250 and 251 at most one D is permitted in the four courses beyond 01:640:250. At least three out of the four elective courses must be taken at Rutgers - New Brunswick/Piscataway. 

Majors

To be admitted into the mathematics major program, a student must normally have completed three terms of calculus with a grade of C or better. Satisfactory progress for a full-time student normally requires completion of at least one mathematics course each term, at an appropriate level, with a grade of C or better. To complete the mathematics major in either of its options, a student must receive grades of C or better in each of 01:640:250, 251, 252, and 300, and in all but at most one of the further mathematics courses counted toward the major. Moreover, a student must receive grades of C or better in all courses from other departments (such as computer science) used to fulfill the requirements of the mathematics major. At least four upper-level math courses, including an analysis course (Math 311, 312, 411, or 412) and an algebra course (Math 350, 351, 352, 451, or 452), must be taken at RU–New Brunswick/ Piscataway. The Mathematical Reasoning course, Math 300, is a pre-requisite for the advanced calculus and abstract algebra courses Math 311, 350, and 351, and several other upper-level mathematics courses.  In particular, students are only eligible to take 311, 350, or 351 if they have obtained a C or better in 300. All mathematics majors must complete: Three terms of Calculus (typically Math 151,152, and 251), Introductory Linear Algebra (Math 250), Differential Equations (Math 252), Introduction to Computing for Mathematics and the Sciences (CS, 01:198:107), or Introduction to Computer Science (CS, 01:198:111), All of the required upper-level courses for one of the three options described in the next section This description has been condensed—see the online catalog for the authoritative version of these requirements: Rutgers Online Catalog: 640 (Pure Mathematics) Option A. Standard Mathematics Major Eight additional 3-credit courses in Mathematics (subject code 640) at the 300-400 level. Three of these must be: Intro to Mathematical Reasoning (Math 300) Either Intro to Real Analysis (Math 311 or 312) or Honors Mathematical Analysis I (Math 411), and Either Linear Algebra (Math 350), or an Abstract Algebra course (Math 351 or 451). The remaining five courses may be chosen from any three-credit offerings of the Department. See the departmental website or the university catalogue for a list of such courses. An appropriate graduate course at Rutgers may be substituted for the required analysis and/or algebra course, with departmental approval. Option B. The Honors Track The Department of Mathematics offers an Honors Track, designed to provide qualified students with an experience of mathematics that is richer, more rigorous, and more personal than is provided by the standard major. It is especially (but not exclusively) intended for students aiming to do graduate work in Mathematics or a related field. The honors track course of study is personalized for each student (in consultation with their faculty advisor and the honors committee), and will normally include the demanding advanced honors sequences 01:640:411-412 and 01:640:451-452, as well as two semesters of one-credit honors seminar, including at least one semester of 01:640:492. Students who successfully complete the Honors Track are eligible to graduate with a B.S.in Mathematics. Students interested in the honors track should submit an application (available online and in Hill 303). Admission is on a rolling basis: applications are kept active and reevaluated each semester, with students being admitted once they have compiled a strong enough record to demonstrate their ability to complete the program. Students interested in and potentially qualified for the honors track are encouraged to take honors sections of calculus and (especially) 01:640:300. More information on the Honors Track  Option C. Actuarial Track The Mathematics Department offers an Actuarial Mathematics Option for those students who want to enter the actuarial profession upon graduation. Graduates of this option have the foundation needed to prepare for three of the Society of Actuaries Exams (P, FM, and MLC), and to earn certifications in statistical and economic subject areas once the student enters into the profession. Generally, students who want to become actuaries will seek an internship with an insurance company or consulting firm between their junior and senior years. Many of these firms actively recruit at Rutgers through Rutgers Career Services. Some students interested in the actuarial profession should consider a major in mathematics and a minor in economics, or a double major in mathematics and economics, rather than the Actuarial Mathematics option. This includes students who intend to pursue a broader mathematical education, possibly including graduate studies in mathematics, as well as those planning to continue on to graduate study in Mathematical Finance. More information on the Actuarial Track About the Rutgers Actuarial Club   Departmental brochure:  Math Department Brochure

Advising

For the time being, all advising is being conducted via email or over the phone by appointment. For general inquiries, please contact the Head Advisor at <>. For more specific contact information, see the chart below. Each math major should speak to an advisor in the math department at least once each semester, during the process of registering for the following semester. 

Tutoring

Tutoring/Review in Mathematics on the New Brunswick Campuses   Mathematics Undergraduate Program Rutgers Learning Center Math and Science Learning Center Math Help Center   Televised Calculus Reviews, Schedules On Now Taped Sessions

Transfer Students

Transfer or Pre-Approval of Courses Taken Elsewhere Q. As a transfer student arriving at Rutgers, how do I get my courses taken elsewhere evaluated for credit at Rutgers? A. See the Head advisor. For courses taken outside the state of New Jersey bring in a syllabus if possible. References: Transfer Credit Chart:  View courses approved for transfer credit NJTransfer Q. As a continuing Rutgers student, when and how do I get approval of courses I wish to take elsewhere? A. Before registering for a summer course in mathematics taken elsewhere, see the Head Advisor to review your prerequisites and the acceptability of the course. No course given in a session of less than 5 weeks is accepted. Warning: Undergraduate students at Rutgers (New Brunswick/Piscataway) MUST have prior written approval from their college (or SAS) before taking a course elsewhere that they want to transfer onto their Rutgers transcript. If such approval is not obtained, no credit will be awarded. The Rutgers New Brunswick/Piscataway Math Department will not approve the transfer of any 3 or more credit course offered in any Session (Summer, Winter, or other) lasting less than 5 weeks. The Rutgers New Brunswick/Piscataway Department will not approve the transfer of courses taught at sites off the campus of the college offering them. Courses that are more than 10 years old are eligible to receive elective credit only and will not be given credit equivalent to a Rutgers New Brunswick course. Evaluation Forms Note: Make sure to also fill out the Transfer Credit Application for Mathematics Courses after reading When to Fill Out Math Transfer Credit Application.

Awards, Prizes Scholarships

Graduation with Honors Scholarships Awards and Prizes  Competitions

Learning Goals

The general liberal arts student will be able to employ algebra and discuss bringing abstract mathematics to bear on areas with no obvious mathematical content to the layman, such as political science, esthetics, or credit card security. Students whose majors require more advanced mathematics will be adequately prepared. Students aiming toward careers in elementary school education will be able to pass state-mandated examinations before certification, and to satisfy the University’s course requirements related to certification. Majors will be able to employ problem solving skills in a wide range of modern mathematics; analyze quantitative information and apply advance mathematic techniques and concepts where appropriate; communicate rigorous mathematical ideas and reasoning effectively; appropriately use supporting technology and work cooperatively as part of a team to solve mathematical problems; and top students will demonstrate experience in research students in combined math/education programs will be able to demonstrate a broad perspective on mathematics, including the history of the subject, and an understanding of the connections between college mathematics and the state's curriculum framework. Students in the B.S. program (Honors Track) will be able to engage in graduate level work toward the doctorate. Minors will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the special nature of mathematical thinking; create and communicate mathematical arguments; apply mathematical knowledge and techniques in advanced courses in their major discipline. Statistics/Mathematics joint major the joint major provides a stronger preparation for graduate study in statistics; the Statistics major is best for students who are interested in statistical applications in industry, government, or applied areas of graduate studeis.
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Department Information

Department of Mathematics
Rutgers University
Hill Center - Busch Campus
110 Frelinghuysen Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019, USA

Telephone:  (848) 445-2390
Fax:  (732) 445-5530

Detailed directions to the department

 

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